The Eisenhower Memorial farce

Featured image We have sporadically followed the long, sad saga of the proposed Eisenhower Memorial. The Eisenhower Memorial Commission has now survived 15 years. We have no Eisenhower Memorial, but the commission has a plan (a bad one) and a promotional website. For good and sufficient reason the National Capital Planning Commission rejected the proposed memorial plan earlier this year. The Washington Examiner reported on the NCPC’s rejection in a long article »

We all live in a ruling class machine

Featured imageAngelo Codevilla has written a piece called “Washington’s Ruling Class Is Fooling Itself About The Islamic State.” Codevilla points to some of the fallacies inherent in President Obama’s approach to dealing with ISIS. I’d like the article more if Codevilla didn’t use the term “ruling class” in nearly every other sentence. I get it: he thinks that Washington Democrats and Republicans are all part of the same ruling class. In »

Ambassador who sided with Muslim Brotherhood spearheads State Department’s anti-ISIS effort

Featured imageJohn Kerry has assembled a three-person team to lead the State Department’s efforts against ISIS. Two of the members — Gen. John Allen and Brett McGurk — seem unobjectionable. The third, Anne Patterson, is another matter. In announcing her central role, Kerry praised Patterson as “one of our nation’s top diplomats deeply respected in the region.” But Patterson is not respected in Egypt, where she served as ambassador during the »

The politics of the vote on arming and training syrian rebels

Featured imageThis week, the Senate voted 78-22 in favor of arming and training Syrian rebels to fight ISIS. Noah Rothman points out that four possible 2016 presidential contenders were among the “no” votes. They are Democrats Elizabeth Warren and Kristen Gillibrand and Republicans Rand Paul and Ted Cruz. A fifth potential contender, Marco Rubio voted “yes.” Rothman suggests that the contenders who voted against arming and training the rebels “calculat[e] that »

I Knew Bob Packwood. Bob Packwood Was a Friend of Mine.

Featured imageIf you thought Joe Biden couldn’t top his “Shylock” performance, you were wrong. Speaking to none other than a Democratic women’s conference, Biden reminisced fondly about the good old days in the Senate, when he got to work with great guys like Bob Packwood. Yes, that Bob Packwood. You know what this reminds me of? Trent Lott. Lott, as you probably recall, was delivering a 100th birthday tribute to Strom »

The Eternal Presumption of the Liberal Mind

Featured imageAt the very end of Matt Bai’s New York Times Magazine feature about Gary Hart that could be titled “Hart-less: The Original Bimbo Eruption,” there’s a short passage that puts on full display the irrepressible presumption of liberalism—or perhaps it’s another example of Bush Derangement Syndrome. Here’s how the piece ends: “It’s what he could have done for this country that I think bothers him to this very day,” Lee »

Remy on the ISIS Crisis

Featured imageOh yeah, you knew this was coming: our hero Remy Munasifi and our pals at Reason.TV out this morning with a 90 second video that combines mockery of Obama’s unserious ISIS “strategy” and the NFL’s timorousness.  Enjoy: »

Gov. Christie Exonerated

Featured imageDid you hear on the national network news broadcasts that the U.S. Justice Department investigation into the New Jersey bridge closures has found no evidence of Gov. Chris Christie’s prior knowledge or involvement?  Or maybe you heard it on the 15-part series about the scandal—the biggest since Teapot Dome!, according to historian Dr. Albert Sharpton, Ph.D (I’m sure he has an honorary Ph.D from somewhere)—on MSNBC?  Me neither. The U.S. »

Verboten in Tehran

Featured imageThe Telegraph reports that six Iranian singers who were arrested for appearing in a viral video dancing to the Pharrell Williams song “Happy” have been sentenced to six months in prison and 91 lashes. The video appears to have received well over a million views at this point. Oliver Duggan writes: The group became famous in May when their music video for the hit song circulated on YouTube, racking up »

Thoughts from the ammo line

Featured imageOur friend Ammo Grrrll reflects on SCHADENFREUDE. She writes: Many years ago, when I still had to navigate the Minnesota highways in winter, I had one of those experiences that fall under the category of Schadenfreude. That is, of course, a fancy word for taking unseemly pleasure when someone is hoisted on his own petard. Petards being in short supply generally, my first Schadenfreude involved a car. After a couple »

Our military leaders’ frustration with Obama boils over

Featured imageIt’s become so obvious that the Washington Post feels compelled to report it — “Rift widens between Obama, U.S. military over strategy to fight Islamic State,” says the Post headline. The main rift is over President Obama’s insistence that he will not use ground troops to fight the “Islamic State.” As the Post notes, “Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, took the rare step of »

Dems Plead For Money For Their War On Women

Featured imageIn Mick Jagger’s immortal words, they don’t embarrass easy. Last night the Democrats were begging me for money. First from Nancy Pelosi: From: Nancy Pelosi [mailto:dccc@dccc.org] Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2014 6:27 PM To: Hinderaker, John H. Subject: John, I’m pleading Today, you should have received an email from: – The President of the United States – The Vice President of the United States That’s how important this is — »

Where the NEA Meets the EPA

Featured imageLots and lots of climate news right now, ahead of next week’s UN “Leaders Climate Summit” that no world leaders are attending, but there’s one story out the last few days that deserves special notice: did you know that $700,000 of your tax dollars went to subsidizing an off-Broadway musical about the evils of climate change? Yes, I know, this sounds like a plot to a lame Mel Brooks remake »

A Walk on the Supply Side

Featured imageA third installment of my conversation with CRB editor Charles Kesler about Ronaldus Magnus on the Claremont Institute’s “American Mind” is now up, just 6:30 long–perfect for a cup of espresso.  This time we look back on supply-side economics and spending controversies.  (Stand by, incidentally, for several Reagan-related announcements and items in the coming days.) »

Bill Henck: Inside the IRS, part 7

Featured imageWilliam Henck has worked inside the IRS Office of the Chief Counsel as an attorney for over 26 years. We posted his personal account, including his testimony to a retaliatory audit conducted by the IRS against him, this past February in “Inside the IRS.” We followed up with subsequent posts including, most recently, “Inside the IRS, part 5″ and, most recently, “Inside the IRS, part 6,” both regarding the promotion »

Scotland rejects independence

Featured imageThe Scots have voted not to become independent from Great Britain. I haven’t seen a final count, but it looks the “no” tally will slightly exceed 55 percent. That’s not as close as some expected, but probably close enough to induce more pandering to the Scots in order to avoid a different result in a future referendum. I would like to have seen Scotland vote to go it alone for »

Rand Paul and the Foreign Policy Delusions of Libertarianism

Featured imageRand Paul spoke today on the Senate floor, opposing the administration’s proposal to arm and train moderate Syrian elements. In recent months, Paul has tried to position himself in the mainstream on foreign policy, and has objected bitterly to being called an isolationist. Yet the very first words of his speech encapsulated the Libertarian delusion: that problems in the world are the result of American actions, and that by remaining »