Latest Atrocity in Israel

A homicide bomber killed fifteen people and wounded more than forty in an attack on a bus in Haifa, Israel. The photo below shows the bombed-out bus.
Bus.jpg
The Washington Post reports that, as is usual in these cases, “the bomb was packed with shards of metal, nuts and bolts to increase its deadliness.” After the blast, “[w]orkers using cherry pickers spent the afternoon removing body parts from the upper branches of nearby trees.”
As a result of Israel’s energetic pursuit of terrorist cells, this was the first successful attack in two months. In the last month alone, there have been over 57 interceptions of would-be Palestinian attackers by Israeli military and security forces, according to an Israeli Foreign Ministry spokesman.
Yasser Arafat pretended to condemn the mass murder, but “[i]n at least four West Bank cities — Nablus, Jenin, Tulkarm and Qalqilyah — small groups of young Palestinians burst into spontaneous celebrations of joy, whistling, honking car horns and shouting support for the attack.” Finally, one got through.
I find the following paragraph in the Post’s article astonishing, although the reporter seems to see nothing remarkable about it:
“‘The bus was in ruins. I saw bodies, blood. I can’t describe it,’ said Damouni, an Israeli Arab. ‘Everything inside was scattered. Everything was broken. There were bodies in the aisle, bodies in the staircases, bodies on the seats. I couldn’t look anymore, and I got out of the place.'”
What an amazing thing, that there are many thousands of Israeli Arabs who go quietly about their business, unmolested, enjoying all rights of citizenship and the full protection of the laws, while their relatives and co-religionists plot genocide. About Israel, as about America, we can only say: Is this a great country, or what?
And, in case anyone doubts that Israel’s enemies are our enemies, the Post reports that near the murderer’s body was found “a letter in Arabic that praises the terror attacks on the twin towers on September 11.”

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