Send in the clowns

John Tabin at the American Spectator blog (the newest addition to our blogroll) thinks that “the real political strength of the [State of the Union] speech was in how it forced the worst stereotypes of the Democratic Party into the foreground by virtue of the opposition’s reactions.” Bush laid the groundwork early in his speech by criticizing excessive partisanship. The Dems did the rest. In addition to remaining seated at “inopportune times,” they played into the president’s hands through their bizarre partisan display of ecstasy when the subject of failed social security reform came up. As Tabin puts it, “it was as if Bush said ‘we mustn’t act like clowns,’ and the entire Democratic caucus had shown up in multicolor wigs and greasepaint.”
Al Gore might well be president today if he had meet the American public’s expectations for decorum. And all he did was sigh a few times. There’s a lesson there, but the Democrats haven’t learned it.

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Send in the clowns

John Tabin at the American Spectator blog (the newest addition to our blogroll) thinks that “the real political strength of the [State of the Union] speech was in how it forced the worst stereotypes of the Democratic Party into the foreground by virtue of the opposition’s reactions.” Bush laid the groundwork early in his speech by criticizing excessive partisanship. The Dems did the rest. In addition to remaining seated at “inopportune times,” they played into the president’s hands through their bizarre partisan display of ecstasy when the subject of failed social security reform came up. As Tabin puts it, “it was as if Bush said ‘we mustn’t act like clowns,’ and the entire Democratic caucus had shown up in multicolor wigs and greasepaint.”
Al Gore might well be president today if he had meet the American public’s expectations for decorum. And all he did was sigh a few times. There’s a lesson there, but the Democrats haven’t learned it.

Responses

Books to read from Power Line