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Heroic history

Mark Moyar is the author of the revisionist Vietnam war history Triumph Forsaken, which we have discussed here previously. Today’s New York Sun carries Mark’s thoughtful review of the new book by H.W. Crocker III, which Mark highly recommends: “Over There: America’s Unsung Heroes.” Here is a part of Mark’s lead-in to the review proper:

The Vietnam-era journalists began a tradition that today’s press consistently upholds. We hear very little from most large press outlets about American heroes in Iraq and Afghanistan, men like James Coffman Jr., Danny Dietz, and Christopher Adlesperger, or about our military successes there. Instead of associating such names with these wars, Americans associate the words they hear most often from the press, like Abu Ghraib and Haditha. As in Vietnam, too, the shunning of heroes does not extend to the press’s coverage of itself. Awards to journalists, both those who have spent time in Iraq and Afghanistan and those who have not, are considered worthy of lengthy news stories.
Publicizing American heroism and success is essential today for two reasons. First, it permits a nuanced view of Iraq and Afghanistan, one which cannot be discerned from the daily stories of sectarian murders and the photos of American troops who have just been killed. Second, American troops and the American people become more courageous and resolute when they hear of their countrymen’s military heroism and success, past and present. In earlier times, Americans ingrained their traditions of heroism and victory into the country’s youth through historical instruction. Today’s history textbooks largely ignore America’s military past, a reflection of the anti-military prejudices, lack of military experience, and cosmopolitanism that pervade the intelligentsia.

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