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Dance for the Debt [Updated: With Explanation!]

I said earlier today that, even though the grand prize winner in the Power Line Prize contest has been announced, there are still a few entries that we want to make public but haven’t yet gotten to. This one is perhaps the most unusual entry we received. It came from a dance company, and I titled it “Dance For the Debt.”

This video was unique in several ways; among other things, it was the only one that came from someone I know. Several of the dancers you see in the video are friends of mine. The dancing is very good and the video is fun. The problem is that I can’t figure out the connection between the dances and the national debt. A financial element does rear its head; in one scene the dancers brandish fists full of dollar bills, while the last scene takes place in a bank. But–call me an insensitive philistine; don’t worry, it’s been done before–I can’t quite make out how it all fits together with the debt issue.

That said, the dancing is very good. Perhaps some of our readers will be able to explain what I missed:

UPDATE: Ha! I knew it would all make sense if you just looked at it the right way! The woman who owns the studio that these dancers are from emailed this explanation; it all seems pretty clear once you have the key:

Part One: Shows a couple buying a house that they clearly could not afford and bankers willing to throw money at them in risky loans. It portrays an unending source of Fannie and Freddie money luring people to buy houses that they shouldn’t, and that the lenders were as irresponsible as the buyers.

Part Two: Shows some of the bad decisions the government has made and the effects on the economy such as those caused by EPA regulations, banning incandescent bulbs in favor of florescent bulbs which just sends more manufacturing jobs to China, discouraging bottled water in plastic bottles in favor of plastic thermoses – makes no sense as the solution still uses plastic, and finally, the ban on drilling for our own oil vs. all the subsidies going to ethanol. All in all, bad economic decisions.

Part Three: Shows the compilation of bad bank loans, the strong arm of union workers on the economy, and as the song’s lyrics suggest, we all need jobs and should get out there and work instead of being a drain on the economy by receiving hand outs from the nanny-state.

Feel free to use this explanation on your blog for those who are confused about our creative minds – LOL!

FURTHER UPDATE: Some of the dancers in the video are also competing in “America’s Got Talent” as part of Team ILuminate.

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