What matters at the State Fair

What is the point of the Black Lives Matter movement? It represents an assault on law enforcement in the name of racial equity. It mounts a race based attack on the forces of order. It seeks to undermine and overcome democratic politics. Thus the epithet hurled by Ta-Nehisi Coates — a sort of one-man Black Lives Matter gang — in his vile manifesto: “majoritarian pigs.” That’s us.

In Minnesota we have seen the crowd in action. As elsewhere, the sight is most unpleasant.

Now the Star Tribune gives us a preview of coming attractions at the Minnesota State Fair later this week. The Black Lives Matter crowd threatens to disrupt the fair’s opening weekend: “The St. Paul-based group is planning a rally and march to protest St. Paul police shootings and alleged racial disparities at the fair. As of Friday evening, 285 people had accepted the group’s Facebook invitation to meet at Hamline Park at 11 a.m. Saturday, Aug., 29, for a march down busy Snelling Avenue toward the fairgrounds, disrupting traffic along the way.”

They’re not in the How To Win Friends & Influence People business. State Fair Director Jerry Hammer (no relation to MC) is not impressed:

If protest organizers would like to reach out to him, Hammer said, he would be happy to find space for a Black Lives Matter booth at the fair. Instead of crossing the path of a few thousand irate commuters Saturday morning, they could have access to the nearly 2 million visitors expected to walk through the fair gates this year.

“If this particular group were to apply for space, I guarantee I would find them a spot,” he said, noting that more than a dozen political parties and elected officials have booths this year. “One thing that’s really cool about the fair is, you can hear from everybody here. It’s this huge forum for ideas and knowledge and opinion.”

“Protest organizer” Rashad Turner rejects the Fair’s offer of space as a ploy. He “considers the fair’s offer an attempt at pacification,” and we can’t have that.