Put a little love in your heart

Hillary Clinton clobbered Bernie Sanders in the South Carolina Democratic primary yesterday, capturing 73 percent of the vote. Paul comments on the outcome here. Clinton’s death march to the Democratic nomination has resumed in earnest.

I think it is worth noting that turnout in the primary was down over 2008, as it has been elsewhere in the Democratic contests to date. The Daily Caller’s Chuck Ross takes a look here. In 2008, the South Carolina electorate set a record when 532,151 voters cast ballots in the Democratic primary. Yesterday the turnout in the Democratic primary amounted to 369,526, down more than 30 percent from 2008.

By contrast, turnout is up substantially among Republicans so far this year. Total turnout in the Republican primary on February 20 was 739,917. The New York Times posts the 2016 South Carolina primary vote totals here.

Rancor among Republicans is also up, however; it must be the highest since 1912. I’m afraid that’s the salient fact at this point.

In 2008 Hillary Clinton professed not to feel “noways tahrd” (i.e., tired). The double negative derived from the gospel number she was quoting; the fake Southern accent was all her own. In 2016, Democratic voters are someways tahrd, or so it seems.

I identify. I’m someways tahrd of Hillary Clinton’s grating monotone, her transparent fakery, her obnoxious condescension, her rank dishonesty and her gross wrongdoing, Her inability to impersonate an authentic human being is almost beside the point. She gleefully anticipates running against Donald Trump as the Republican nominee in the general election and she is turning her attention to him.

Her victory speech last night ran some 17 minutes (video below). It feels more like 17 hours. RealClearPolitics has also posted the whole thing here. The Associated Press condenses the blather into a two-minute highlight reel accompanying the AP story on Clinton’s victory in the South Carolina primary. She now presents herself as the apostle of love and kindness.

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