Happy Earth Day!

In all the excitement today (Fox Business News appearance this morning, then graduation ceremonies on the bluff overlooking the Pacific Ocean in Malibu for the 2016 class at Pepperdine’s Graduate School of Public Policy), I almost forgot that it’s Lenin’s birthday Earth Day!

Actually Earth Day has become quite a bore, and the sheer repetition of reminding folks of the invincible ignorance and malice of environmentalists is equally tiresome, but out of duty, see Mark Perry’s perennial reminder of the wrongheadedness of environmental predictions. Let’s also remember the story of Ira Einhorn, one of the founders of the first Earth Day who later murdered his girlfriend and then composted her body. Hey—at least he was practicing recycling, even though recycling is mostly stupid and environmentally wasteful.

But in the new and equally humiliating department for the greens, let’s wallow in this week’s story from the Los Angeles Times about how global warming has improved the weather for 80 percent of Americans:

Since Americans first heard the term global warming in the 1970s, the weather has actually improved for most people living in the U.S. But it won’t always be that way, according to a new study.

Research shows Americans typically — and perhaps unsurprisingly — like warmer winters and dislike hot, humid summers. And they reveal their weather preferences by moving to areas with conditions they like best.

A new study in the journal Nature has found that 80% of the U.S. population lives in counties experiencing more pleasant weather than they did 40 years ago.

“Virtually all Americans are now experiencing the much milder winters that they typically prefer, and these mild winters have not been offset by markedly more uncomfortable summers or other negative changes,” write Patrick Egan, a political scientist at New York University, and Megan Mullin, professor of environmental politics at Duke University.

Heh. Now that is great Earth Day news.

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