California’s Suicide Attempt, Part 7: Bag It!

Ho do you wreck one of the most beautiful cities in the world? Simple: turn it over to “progressive” government.

The latest out of San Francisco is this cheery story (avert your gaze now if you’re squeamish about raw sewage):

’20 pounds of human waste’ dropped on San Francisco street corner

A foul odor permeated from a massive bag of human excrement sludge left on a street corner in San Francisco’s Tenderloin district Saturday.

The horrendous smell and sight quickly gained notoriety when a Reddit user posted a screen shot of a report made to San Francisco’s Citizen app for identifying crimes.

“Twenty pounds of feces dumped onto sidewalk,” the report called out. Nancy Alfaro, a spokesperson for 311, says three reports of the human waste at the corner of Cedar and Polk were made to the city’s customer service number and app on Saturday. “The customers did report a large amount of waste,” Alfaro says. “It was sent to Public Works.”

Alfaro says while reports of human waste are common, this large of an amount is “not typical.” She “has no idea” why the bag was left in the neighborhood.

Reports of human waste are “common.” Let that, um, sink in for a bit. Meanwhile, “progressive” government has consequences, such as a major trade group deciding to bag its plans to hold future meetings in such a s—hole city:

SF’s appalling street life repels residents — now it’s driven away a convention

In a move that is alarming San Francisco’s biggest industry, a major medical association is pulling its annual convention out of the city — saying its members no longer feel safe.

“It’s the first time that we have had an out-and-out cancellation over the issue, and this is a group that has been coming here every three or four years since the 1980s,” said Joe D’Alessandro, president and CEO of S.F. Travel, the city’s convention bureau.

D’Alessandro declined to name the medical association, saying the bureau still hopes to bring the group back in the future.

As a rule, major conventions book their visits at least five years in advance. So when D’Alessandro and members of the hospitality industry hadn’t heard from the doctors about re-upping, they flew to the organization’s Chicago headquarters for a face-to-face meeting with its executive board.

And with good reason: The group’s annual five-day trade show draws 15,000 attendees and pumps about $40 million into the local economy.

“They said that they are committed to this year and to 2023, but nothing in between or nothing thereafter,” D’Alessandro said. “After that, they told us they are planning to go elsewhere — I believe it’s Los Angeles.”

In the meanwhile, D’Alessandro said, the rumbling of discontent continues from a number of conventions — “even from local tech companies who hold some of our biggest annual events.”

Pretty clear the unnamed “major medical association” in question is the American Medical Association, since it is based in Chicago. I wonder why the reluctance to report this, on either side of the story?

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