Author Archives: Paul Mirengoff

Hillary lectures reporters, gets standing ovation

Featured image Hillary Clinton told a crowd of journalists that she wants a new beginning in her relations with the press. Then, to prove her sincerity she entertained questions for 20 minutes. Just kidding. Clinton did talk of a new beginning, but she took no questions, according to the National Journal. The assemblage of hard-nosed reporters was clearly put off by Clinton’s unwillingness to take questions. Accordingly, Clinton received only polite applause »

Is Ted Cruz’s limited experience in major office a serious concern?

Featured image Ted Cruz’s announcement that he’s running for president was greeted by some Republicans with a warning against electing a first-term Senator to our highest office. Didn’t we just try this? How has it worked out? I agree that, other things being about equal, a governor (or former governor) is preferable to a Senator, when it comes to fitness for the presidency. And an experienced Senator is preferable to an inexperienced »

Justice Kennedy’s testimony about gridlock harkens back to Obamacare case

Featured image Justice Kennedy made an interesting comment today when he testified to Congress regarding the Supreme Court’s budget. Responding to a question about politically charged issues before the Court, Kennedy stated: We think an efficient, responsive legislation and executive branch in the political system will alleviate some of that pressure. We routinely decide cases involving federal statutes and we say, well, if this is wrong the Congress will fix it. But »

Benghazi emails show that Clinton’s aides used private accounts

Featured image Michael Schmidt of the New York Times, who broke the story about Hillary Clinton’s use, exclusively, of a private account for State Department business, reports on the 300 or so Clinton emails that have been released to Trey Gowdy’s committee on Benghazi. Schmidt was not permitted to review these emails, but did receive descriptions of some of them from “four senior government officials.” Arguably, the most interesting fact revealed by »

Ted Cruz officially enters the race

Featured image Ted Cruz will make it official today; he’s running for president. Unofficially, he’s been running since he arrived in Washington in 2013, and probably for much longer (not that there’s anything wrong with this). Cruz is undervalued, I think, by the pundit-oddsmakers. Most would probably agree that, if Cruz becomes the favorite of the conservative base, he will be a top-tier candidate, if not a co-favorite for the nomination. As »

Peace in our time, multicultural style

Featured image President Obama’s message to the people of Iran left me puzzled. What was its purpose? Taken at face value, the message was an attempt to induce the Iranian public to press its leaders to accept a nuclear deal. But Obama knows that the Iranian public has no say on the matter. Obama is naive about foreign affairs, but not that naive. Eli Lake suggests a better explanation. Iran, he notes, »

John Kerry goes all Brian Williams — and John Kerry

Featured image That hot day in the summer of 1988 is seared, seared in John Kerry’s memory: Climate change is an issue that is personal to me, and it has been since the 1980s, when we were organizing the very first climate hearings in the Senate…. Al Gore, Tim Wirth, and a group of us organized the first hearings in the Senate on this, 1988. We heard Jim Hansen sit in front »

Unsupported charges of racism in Charlottesville

Featured image African-American students at the University of Virginia are alleging a pattern of racial bias at the University of Virginia and in Charlottesville, according to the Washington Post. The allegation stems from an incident in which a Black student apparently had his face pressed into the pavement by law enforcement officers when they arrested him on misdemeanor charges of public intoxication and obstruction of justice. The student ended up with a »

Assad crosses Obama’s imaginary red line

Featured image Don’t look now, but the Assad regime is once again using chemical weapons in the Syrian civil war. Reports are that it has dropped chlorine gas on civilians in recent days. Readers will recall that President Obama, working with Vladimir Putin, negotiated a deal to strip Assad of his chemical weapons. Unfortunately, chlorine was not part of the deal. This is odd because, as Max Boot reminds us, chlorine is »

Federal judge asks, “Can I trust what the president says?” DOJ lawyer gives wrong answer

Featured image Judge Andrew Hanen, the federal judge who blocked President immigration executive action, suggested yesterday that he might order sanctions against the Justice Department if he rules that it misled him about when the administration began implementing one of its immigration measures. Judge Hanen is concerned that the Justice Department misled him into believing that a key part of Obama’s amnesty program would not be implemented before he made a ruling »

How feminism became boring

Featured image 45 years ago, I found feminists to be intellectually interesting. Perhaps this was due to the fact that they were more intellectually interesting than the Marxists I hung out with, but I think there was more to it than that. I now find most feminists boring even compared to Marxists. But Camille Paglia remains extraordinarily interesting. Paglia delivers a virtuoso display in this interview with Nick Gillespie. Among other things, »

Playing the race card against Netanyahu

Featured image The West seems to be in the process of switching sides when it comes to Israel and Iran. Negotiations that will lift sanctions on Iran are in the final stages; meanwhile European leaders are discussing the imposition of sanctions on Israel. Moreover, under President Obama, the U.S. is no longer committed to ending Iran’s nuclear weapons program which represents an existential threat to Israel. Instead, it is prepared to sign »

Additional thoughts on the Kaus case and on Fox News

Featured image I’d like to add a few observations to Scott’s important post about Mickey Kaus’ departure from the Daily Caller. Kaus wrote a column criticizing Fox News for not leading the charge against Obama’s executive amnesty. Tucker Carlson, a Fox News contributor and host, pulled the column. Kaus resigned. I raised basically the same concern as Kaus tried to about Fox News during the debate on the Schumer-Rubio amnesty legislation in »

Lowly Everton is England’s last hope [UPDATE - and then there were none]

Featured image This has been a dreadful Premier League season for Everton Football Club. Our record is 7 wins, 12 defeats, and 10 draws. For the first time in years, we have genuine relegation worries. In fact, until Sunday’s 3-0 victory over Newcastle, Everton was only three points above the drop zone. Nonetheless, Everton is the last English club playing in European competition. Mighty Chelsea, Manchester City, and Arsenal were all eliminated »

What happens next in Israel?

Featured image Benjamin Netanyahu has won; now what? The answer may depend to some extent on what kind of a governing coalition he forms. Will he form one with the major right-wing parties or will he put together a unity government that includes the center-left? Mario Loyola suggests that given the gravity of the threats to Israel’s security, a unity government might make more sense. Regardless of the nature of the governing »

Israel, “the world’s most vibrant democracy”

Featured image Like the American left, Palestinians aren’t pleased about Benjamin Netanyahu’s victory. But some Palestinian opinion leaders are taking the news more graciously than David Axelrod and, I would argue, President Obama. Evelyn Gordon reports: A veteran Palestinian journalist from Ramallah summed up the prevailing sentiment [among Palestinians] succinctly. “We say all these bad things about Israel, but at least the people there have the right to vote and enjoy democracy,” »

The left’s angry response to Netanyahu’s victory

Featured image As a bonus to Benjamin Netanyahu’s unexpected victory in Israel’s election, we are treated to the public gnashing of teeth by the American left. For example, David Axelrod tweeted: “Tightness of exits in Israel suggests Bibi’s shameful 11th hour demagoguery may have swayed enough votes to save him. But at what cost?” This is rich coming from Axelrod who, as Mary Katharine Ham points out, “ran a campaign that accused »