Author Archives: Paul Mirengoff

Obama mum on Scottish secession

Featured image I wrote here about the upcoming vote in Scotland on this question: “Should Scotland be an independent country?” The referendum is set for September, and support for independence is growing. According to the Washington Post, the unionist lead has dropped to single digits. The Post reports that, in response, “British officials from across the political spectrum, European Union leaders, corporate executives, and retired military commanders” are all urging Scottish voters »

The Warthog, a soldier’s best friend; Obama, not so much

Featured image Why is President Bush so much more popular than President Obama among Iraq and Afghanistan veterans? That’s an easy one. Bush was the president of let’s roll. Obama is the president of let’s retreat. Iraq and Afghanistan veterans subscribed to the motto that America’s colors “don’t run.” Under Obama, however, they have. There must also be a sense that Bush had a closer personal connection than Obama with those who »

Brandeis’s “repressive tolerance”

Featured image Like me, Michael Ledeen finds that “if there’s anything really new about Brandeis’ disinvitation to Ayaan Hirsi Ali, it’s that they invited her at all.” While many seem surprised that Brandeis, founded by Jews in the immediate aftermath of the Holocaust, would align itself with Islamists and their apologists, Ledeen finds no underlying inconsistency. Brandeis was the home of professor Herbert Marcuse, the iconic leftist philosopher of the 1960s. Marcuse »

Iran’s gas exports up 258 percent

Featured image Is President Obama’s sanctions relief for Iran working? It depends on one’s perspective. From the perspective of those who hope to see a deal that would prevent Iran from obtaining nuclear weapons, the answer is no. Predictably enough, nothing has been accomplished on that front. As Michael Rubin says, the sanctions relief was the diplomatic equivalent of giving a five-year-old dessert first and then expecting him to eat his spinach. »

The war on standards — standards win a round

Featured image I have written often about the left’s war on standards, an attempt to bulldoze standards of conduct and achievement that stand in the way of equal distribution of society’s benefits and prizes to Blacks. One major front in that war is the federal government’s attack, via EEOC lawsuits, on employers that use the background checks to screen applicants for employment. The government takes particular exception to the use of criminal »

What did Brandeis know and when did it know it?

Featured image When I visited Brandeis in 2005 with my daughter (then a high school junior), the admissions office bragged about the University’s activist tradition, including the fact that its alums include Angela Davis and Abbie Hoffman. None of the prospective students seemed to have heard of these left-wing criminals; apparently we parents we supposed to tell our children how cool they were. In recent years, Brandeis has conferred honorary degrees on »

Al Sharpton — born to be an informant

Featured image When I read that race-hustler Al Sharpton was an FBI informant during the 1980s, my reaction was: finally, something to like about the guy. But informants aren’t likeable. Bill Otis writes: I was a federal prosecutor for many years, and I can tell you that informants are necessary, particularly in mob and big drug conspiracy cases. But they’re a boatload of trouble. For one thing, anyone in a position to »

Brandeis reverses itself on honorary degree to Ayaan Hirsi Ali

Featured image Ayaan Hirsi Ali is a Power Line hero for reasons that will become clear below. Brandeis University was set to give her an honorary degree at this year’s commencement exercises. But bowing to pressure from Muslim students, outside advocacy groups, and a portion of its faculty, Brandeis has backed down. As much as I admire Ayaan Hirsi Ali, I don’t condemn Brandeis’ decision. My reasons will, I hope, also become »

Is this degree really necessary?

Featured image Scott Walker, who did not graduate from college, says he wants to obtain his degree. According to his spokesperson, Walker would like to do so through the University of Wisconsin’s FlexOption once it expands its degree offerings. Walker attended Marquette University but left in his senior year in 1990 for a job with the American Red Cross. He then launched his political career and never returned to school. Walker says »

Speech, corruption, and the Republican form of government

Featured image Thomas Jefferson recorded a dinner conversation in which John Adams argued that if the British government could be purged of “corruption,” it would become the most perfect government ever devised. Alexander Hamilton shocked Jefferson and Adams when he replied that if purged of corruption, the British system would fall. By corruption, Hamilton apparently had in mind the Crown’s ability to influence the House of Commons. He also had in mind »

This news from Florida made my day

Featured image Gov. Rick Scott has pulled at least even with rank opportunist Charlie Crist in the Florida gubernatorial race, according to a new Voter Survey Service poll commissioned by Sunshine State News. In 2010, VSS’s polling of the corresponding race came closest to matching the outcome, according to the Sunshine State News. Scott holds a narrow, and indeed statistically insignificant, 45-44 lead over Crist. However, Scott’s 49-42 lead among respondents who »

Soft, boring Power

Featured image This article about Samantha Power by Manuel Roig-Franzia of the Washington Post is mainly an attempt to explain away the fact that the famous anti-genocide crusader faithfully serves an administration that has done essentially nothing in response to mass murder in Syria. Along the way we learn that, for Power, “boring” has never been “ok.” This tidbit may explain a lot. Perhaps Power never really hated Israel; those anti-Israeli statements »

Jeb Bush tests the waters

Featured image Jeb Bush is coming under fire for saying yesterday that many of those who enter the U.S. illegally do so as “an act of love” towards their family and therefore shouldn’t be treated as ordinary criminals. Bush stated: Yes, they broke the law, but it’s not a felony. It’s an act of love. It’s an act of commitment to your family. I honestly think that that is a different kind »

Was Piers Morgan right after all?

Featured image Everton comprehensively defeated Arsenal today, 3-0 at Goodison Park. With the victory, the Toffees move within one point of the Gunners for the final Champions League place, and have a game in hand. Everton outworked Arsenal all over the pitch. We also had a clear edge in tactics, thanks to our manager, Roberto Martinez. The Gunners legendary manager, Arsene Wenger, seemed unaware of the threat Everton poses down the left »

The Obama administration — more solicitous of dreadlocks than of religion

Featured image The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is charged with combatting certain forms of employment discrimination. Unfortunately, it long ago became, instead, a special pleader for certain minority groups. As such, it is dedicated to arguing for pretty much whatever certain minority groups want in the workplace. For example, some blacks like to wear dreadlocks. Thus, the EEOC claims that grooming codes, applicable to all employees, that include a prohibition »

Romney was right, corporations are people too

Featured image Mitt Romney received much criticism for saying during his 2012 presidential campaign that “corporations are people, my friend.” In the same connection, liberals (though not all) have rallied behind the idea that, by their very nature, corporations cannot hold religious beliefs for purposes of the First Amendment. But Romney was right. Corporations have feelings and emotions — like pride, disappointment, and humility — and they are capable of feeling hurt. »

Former CIA official responds to attack by Senate Dems

Featured image I wrote here about the report by Democrats on the Senate Intelligence which, according to leaks, accuses the CIA of all manner of misconduct during the perilous post-9/11 period. I concluded that there is no basis for evaluating the truth of the report’s findings and that, considering the source, little reason to credit its conclusions or to take it very seriously. The same would be true, I added, if the »