Author Archives: Paul Mirengoff

The Republicans’ natural Senate majority, and its implications

Featured image I used to argue that the Republicans have a natural majority in the Senate in the sense that, given a 50-50 election, the House will be almost evenly divided, the presidential winner will be uncertain, but the Senate will likely be Republican (though this would require 50-50 elections over the course of three cycles). The reason, of course, is that the Senate gives equal weight to thinly populated states and »

Goose, Sky, and Monster Mash — All-time Kentucky basketball greats

Featured image No college basketball program has a richer history than the University of Kentucky’s. It’s all there: the good (eight national championships); the bad (a major point shaving scandal); and the ugly (the racism, albeit arguably overstated, of legendary coach Adolph Rupp). Selecting all-stars from a program that has been so dominant over such a long period of time raises special difficulties. Prolific scorers from bygone eras can’t easily be shunted »

The narcissism of Dartmouth’s modern-day radicals

Featured image Yesterday, in a post about the occupation by Dartmouth rads of the president’s office, I wondered whether what’s going on at the College — absurd demands followed up by physical coercion — is occurring at comparable institutions of higher learning. The preliminary answer, based on reader response and a little bit of research, appears to be no — at least not yet. Campus radicalism these days seems to be focused »

Public comments force IRS to hold off on new 501(c)(4) regs

Featured image In writing about the IRS’s proposed effort to silence conservatives through new regulations on 501(c)(4) organizations, we noted the enormous number of public comments being submitted in response to the regs. In the end, the number of comments exceeded 150,000. I don’t know whether the criticisms have been heard by the IRS but their weight has been felt. Today IRS Commissioner Koskinen told an audience at the National Press Club »

Mek, Rip, and Corny — All-time Connecticut basketball greats

Featured image It happens that three of the Final Four this year — Wisconsin, Kentucky, and Connecticut — were teams that Maryland defeated on its way to the Final Four during the Championship run of 2002. The Connecticut game was the Terps most difficult game of the tournament and, in my view, one of the most fiercely contested, best played NCAA games ever. The competitiveness of the game was a tribute to »

Dartmouth’s chickens come home to roost — in the president’s office

Featured image The Dartmouth students known as “Concerned Asian, Black, Latin@, Native, Undocumented, Queer, and Differently-Abled students” have followed through on their threat to take “physical action” if the College’s administrators don’t reply to their demands. Their physical action consists of occupying the office of Phil Hanlon, Dartmouth’s president. The demands of these activists are so absurd that when I first reported on them some very intelligent people told me that this »

The Louisiana Senate race — a pessimistic view

Featured image Byron York takes a comprehensive look at the Louisiana Senate race between Sen. Mary Landrieu and Rep. Bill Cassidy. The polls show that this one is a dead heat as of now. Byron finds that, although Obamacare will play a significant role in the race, the deciding factor may be the extent to which elections are won by bringing home the bacon. Landrieu is, of course, a masterful deliverer of »

The staggering costs of Obamacare

Featured image Now that President Obama has completed his end-zone dance for perhaps signing up more people for health insurance than have been dropped from coverage due to Obamacare, it’s time for a sober look at the costs of his signature program. Our friend Tevi Troy, head of the American Health Policy Institute (AHPI), provides that look in a study called “The Cost of the Affordable Care Act to Large Employers.” The »

This week in Redskins history — Sonny Jurgensen and DeSean Jackson

Featured image On March 31, 1964, the Washington Redskins acquired quarterback Sonny Jurgensen from the Philadelphia Eagles in exchange for quarterback Norm Snead. The Eagles threw in linebacker/defensive back Jimmy Carr; the Redskins threw in cornerback Claude Crabb whom Jurgensen and other good NFL quarterbacks torched pretty regularly. (Crabb, though, became a good special teams player). I still remember where I was when I heard the news on the radio — in »

Abbas plays the “apply for international membership” card

Featured image John Kerry often seems like a man who can’t be discouraged, especially when he sniffs a Noble Peace Prize. But Kerry can’t be pleased by his latest humiliation. With talks between the Secretary of State and Mahmoud Abbas scheduled for today, the PA president abruptly moved to join 15 international agencies, a move vigorously opposed by both Israel and the U.S. The Kerry-Abbas meeting was, accordingly, cancelled. Abbas said he »

Alando, Michael, and Little Stretch — all-time wisconsin basketball greats

Featured image Like the Florida Gators, the Wisconsin Badgers spent many decades in the college basketball wilderness. They won the NCAA championship in 1941, but from 1947 until 1994 they made zero appearances in the NCAA tournament. During the wilderness years, the Badgers were known at times for big men of limited effectiveness like Al (The Tree) Henry and the Hughes twins (Kim and Kerry). Henry was Philadelphia’s first-round pick in the »

John Kerry plays the Jonathan Pollard card

Featured image The word is that, in order to keep John Kerry’s Middle East “peace talks” from collapsing, the United States is talking about releasing Jonathan Pollard, the Israeli spy. I hope the Israelis don’t take the bait. More significantly, Pollard reportedly hopes they don’t take it. According to Construction and Housing Minister Uri Ariel, Pollard has told him that he opposes being released as part of such a “disgraceful deal.” To »

Senate Democrats fire once again on the CIA

Featured image A new report by the Senate Intelligence Committee accuses the CIA of all manner of misconduct during the perilous post-9/11 period in which that Agency helped America combat al Qaeda and prevent additional deadly attacks. The Committee’s core conclusion, according to the Washington Post, is that “the CIA misled the government and the public about aspects of its brutal interrogation program for years.” Specifically, the CIA is said to have »

Socialists routed in French local elections; new prime minister named

Featured image In 2012, the French narrowly elected Socialist Party candidate Francoise Hollande to be their president. Polls showed that even as they did so, voters had little confidence in Hollande’s ability to deal with the economy. His victory seemed to stem in part from the electorate’s dislike, on a personal level, of Nicolas Sarkozy. Hmm. No confidence in the leftist, but ill-will towards the center-right candidate? Sounds like President Obama’s reelection »

Joakim, Al, and the M&M backcourt — All-time Gator basketball greats

Featured image This year’s NCAA basketball tournament has provided far more than its share of exciting games. And now it has produced a Final Four: Florida, Wisconsin, Connecticut, and Kentucky. As tends to happen when there are so many thrills and spills, this Final Four is problematic for those of us who want to see the championship go to the best college team, not the hottest. Connecticut finished third in its recently »

Jeb Bush in 2016? No thank you

Featured image I share Steve’s skepticism about the wisdom of nominating Jeb Bush for president, an idea being pushed by the “GOP elite” according to the Washington Post. Indeed, I think that nominating Bush would be bad idea. I agree with Steve that Bush is an able leader. Indeed, Bush was held in sufficient regard by GOP leaders that if he had won his race for Florida governor in 1994, instead of »

Government lawyers set out to reorder college sports

Featured image A regional director of the National Labor Relations Board has ruled that scholarship football players at Northwestern University are “employees” and therefore should be allowed to organize a union. The United Steelworkers Union is backing the unionization effort at Northwestern. The ruling is the latest example of law’s imperial intrusion (this time by a bureaucrat, rather than a judge) into aspects of American life where it does not belong. College »