Author Archives: Paul Mirengoff

Speech, corruption, and the Republican form of government

Featured image Thomas Jefferson recorded a dinner conversation in which John Adams argued that if the British government could be purged of “corruption,” it would become the most perfect government ever devised. Alexander Hamilton shocked Jefferson and Adams when he replied that if purged of corruption, the British system would fall. By corruption, Hamilton apparently had in mind the Crown’s ability to influence the House of Commons. He also had in mind »

This news from Florida made my day

Featured image Gov. Rick Scott has pulled at least even with rank opportunist Charlie Crist in the Florida gubernatorial race, according to a new Voter Survey Service poll commissioned by Sunshine State News. In 2010, VSS’s polling of the corresponding race came closest to matching the outcome, according to the Sunshine State News. Scott holds a narrow, and indeed statistically insignificant, 45-44 lead over Crist. However, Scott’s 49-42 lead among respondents who »

Soft, boring Power

Featured image This article about Samantha Power by Manuel Roig-Franzia of the Washington Post is mainly an attempt to explain away the fact that the famous anti-genocide crusader faithfully serves an administration that has done essentially nothing in response to mass murder in Syria. Along the way we learn that, for Power, “boring” has never been “ok.” This tidbit may explain a lot. Perhaps Power never really hated Israel; those anti-Israeli statements »

Jeb Bush tests the waters

Featured image Jeb Bush is coming under fire for saying yesterday that many of those who enter the U.S. illegally do so as “an act of love” towards their family and therefore shouldn’t be treated as ordinary criminals. Bush stated: Yes, they broke the law, but it’s not a felony. It’s an act of love. It’s an act of commitment to your family. I honestly think that that is a different kind »

Was Piers Morgan right after all?

Featured image Everton comprehensively defeated Arsenal today, 3-0 at Goodison Park. With the victory, the Toffees move within one point of the Gunners for the final Champions League place, and have a game in hand. Everton outworked Arsenal all over the pitch. We also had a clear edge in tactics, thanks to our manager, Roberto Martinez. The Gunners legendary manager, Arsene Wenger, seemed unaware of the threat Everton poses down the left »

The Obama administration — more solicitous of dreadlocks than of religion

Featured image The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is charged with combatting certain forms of employment discrimination. Unfortunately, it long ago became, instead, a special pleader for certain minority groups. As such, it is dedicated to arguing for pretty much whatever certain minority groups want in the workplace. For example, some blacks like to wear dreadlocks. Thus, the EEOC claims that grooming codes, applicable to all employees, that include a prohibition »

Romney was right, corporations are people too

Featured image Mitt Romney received much criticism for saying during his 2012 presidential campaign that “corporations are people, my friend.” In the same connection, liberals (though not all) have rallied behind the idea that, by their very nature, corporations cannot hold religious beliefs for purposes of the First Amendment. But Romney was right. Corporations have feelings and emotions — like pride, disappointment, and humility — and they are capable of feeling hurt. »

Former CIA official responds to attack by Senate Dems

Featured image I wrote here about the report by Democrats on the Senate Intelligence which, according to leaks, accuses the CIA of all manner of misconduct during the perilous post-9/11 period. I concluded that there is no basis for evaluating the truth of the report’s findings and that, considering the source, little reason to credit its conclusions or to take it very seriously. The same would be true, I added, if the »

The Republicans’ natural Senate majority, and its implications

Featured image I used to argue that the Republicans have a natural majority in the Senate in the sense that, given a 50-50 election, the House will be almost evenly divided, the presidential winner will be uncertain, but the Senate will likely be Republican (though this would require 50-50 elections over the course of three cycles). The reason, of course, is that the Senate gives equal weight to thinly populated states and »

Goose, Sky, and Monster Mash — All-time Kentucky basketball greats

Featured image No college basketball program has a richer history than the University of Kentucky’s. It’s all there: the good (eight national championships); the bad (a major point shaving scandal); and the ugly (the racism, albeit arguably overstated, of legendary coach Adolph Rupp). Selecting all-stars from a program that has been so dominant over such a long period of time raises special difficulties. Prolific scorers from bygone eras can’t easily be shunted »

The narcissism of Dartmouth’s modern-day radicals

Featured image Yesterday, in a post about the occupation by Dartmouth rads of the president’s office, I wondered whether what’s going on at the College — absurd demands followed up by physical coercion — is occurring at comparable institutions of higher learning. The preliminary answer, based on reader response and a little bit of research, appears to be no — at least not yet. Campus radicalism these days seems to be focused »

Public comments force IRS to hold off on new 501(c)(4) regs

Featured image In writing about the IRS’s proposed effort to silence conservatives through new regulations on 501(c)(4) organizations, we noted the enormous number of public comments being submitted in response to the regs. In the end, the number of comments exceeded 150,000. I don’t know whether the criticisms have been heard by the IRS but their weight has been felt. Today IRS Commissioner Koskinen told an audience at the National Press Club »

Mek, Rip, and Corny — All-time Connecticut basketball greats

Featured image It happens that three of the Final Four this year — Wisconsin, Kentucky, and Connecticut — were teams that Maryland defeated on its way to the Final Four during the Championship run of 2002. The Connecticut game was the Terps most difficult game of the tournament and, in my view, one of the most fiercely contested, best played NCAA games ever. The competitiveness of the game was a tribute to »

Dartmouth’s chickens come home to roost — in the president’s office

Featured image The Dartmouth students known as “Concerned Asian, Black, Latin@, Native, Undocumented, Queer, and Differently-Abled students” have followed through on their threat to take “physical action” if the College’s administrators don’t reply to their demands. Their physical action consists of occupying the office of Phil Hanlon, Dartmouth’s president. The demands of these activists are so absurd that when I first reported on them some very intelligent people told me that this »

The Louisiana Senate race — a pessimistic view

Featured image Byron York takes a comprehensive look at the Louisiana Senate race between Sen. Mary Landrieu and Rep. Bill Cassidy. The polls show that this one is a dead heat as of now. Byron finds that, although Obamacare will play a significant role in the race, the deciding factor may be the extent to which elections are won by bringing home the bacon. Landrieu is, of course, a masterful deliverer of »

The staggering costs of Obamacare

Featured image Now that President Obama has completed his end-zone dance for perhaps signing up more people for health insurance than have been dropped from coverage due to Obamacare, it’s time for a sober look at the costs of his signature program. Our friend Tevi Troy, head of the American Health Policy Institute (AHPI), provides that look in a study called “The Cost of the Affordable Care Act to Large Employers.” The »

This week in Redskins history — Sonny Jurgensen and DeSean Jackson

Featured image On March 31, 1964, the Washington Redskins acquired quarterback Sonny Jurgensen from the Philadelphia Eagles in exchange for quarterback Norm Snead. The Eagles threw in linebacker/defensive back Jimmy Carr; the Redskins threw in cornerback Claude Crabb whom Jurgensen and other good NFL quarterbacks torched pretty regularly. (Crabb, though, became a good special teams player). I still remember where I was when I heard the news on the radio — in »