Author Archives: Paul Mirengoff

This day in baseball history: Twins win twice, cling to first place

Featured image 1965 was only the third year since 1948 that the New York Yankees did not win the American League pennant. Unlike the previous two instances — 1954 (when they won 103 games) and 1959 (when they were only 4 games back in early July) — the ’65 Yankees were never in contention. On this day 50 years ago, they were in sixth place, 10 games off the pace. That pace »

Hillary sags in early states

Featured image Rich Lowry says that a “plugged-in lefty” tells him he believes that Bernie Sanders will defeat Hillary Clinton in both Iowa and New Hampshire. This scenario may sound far-fetched, but polling data suggests it could come to pass. A new WMUR/CNN Granite State Poll, conducted by the University of New Hampshire Survey Center from June 18 to 24, puts Sanders within 8 points of Clinton, 43-35 (with a margin of »

Justice Kennedy’s eyes are wide shut on the gay rights assault on religion

Featured image In Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project, Justice Kennedy acknowledged the dangers of ruling that disparate impact analysis applies to Fair Housing Act cases, and he tried to erect limitations that would avoid these dangers. However, as Justice Alito showed in his dissent, the supposed limitations will not constrain liberal bureaucrats and judges. A parallel exchange can be found in today’s ruling finding a »

In housing case, Justice Kennedy’s eyes are wide shut

Featured image I wrote here about yesterday’s decision by the Supreme Court in Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project. By a 5-4 vote, with Justice Kennedy writing for the majority, the Court held that the Fair Housing Act allows lawsuits based on disparate impact. Usually in a case like this, it is the dissent that warns of the dire consequences that may well flow from the »

Looks like Hillary did not give State Dept. all of her work-related emails

Featured image Earlier this month, we learned that Sidney Blumenthal turned over to Trey Gowdy’s committee 61 emails in which he corresponded with Hillary Clinton that the State Department hadn’t produced in response to a subpoena by the committee for such documents. The question was: did State have the documents but fail to produce them to the committee or did State not have the documents because Hillary, who kept them on a »

From Justice Scalia’s dissent

Featured image Justice Scalia dissented vigorously from the Supreme Court’s decision upholding Obamacare subsidies on the federal exchange. Justices Thomas and Alito joined in that dissent. Here are key excerpts from Scalia’s dissent: We should start calling this law SCOTUScare. The Court interprets §36B to award tax credits on both federal and state Exchanges. It accepts that the “most natural sense” of the phrase “Exchange established by the State” is an Exchange »

Supreme Court upholds Obamacare subsidies [With Comment by John]

Featured image The vote was 6-3. Chief Justice Roberts wrote the opinion. The dissenters were Justices Scalia, Thomas, and Alito. Two big wins for the Obama administration today, the other being the housing case (see post below). UPDATE: According to SCOTUSblog, where I’m following today’s developments, the majority acknowledges the strength of the argument that the plain language of the statute permits subsidies only on state exchanges. However, the majority says that »

Supreme Court finds disparate impact claims cognizable in housing cases

Featured image The Supreme Court has just affirmed the Fifth Circuit’s ruling that the Fair Housing Act allows lawsuits based on disparate impact – that is, an allegation that a law or practice has a discriminatory effect, even if it wasn’t based on a discriminatory purpose. The case is Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project. The vote was 5-4. Justice Kennedy wrote the opinion. Without reading »

Freddie Gray autopsy report raises problems for prosecution

Featured image The Baltimore Sun says it has obtained a copy of the autopsy report in the Freddie Gray case. The Sun hasn’t published the report but presents a summary of it here. If the Sun’s description is accurate, the report will likely hurt, perhaps fatally, the prosecution’s case at least with respect to its most serious charges. Before getting into specifics, let me observe that, as described by the Sun, the »

Hillary relies on Republicans to be a party of cowards

Featured image Hillary Clinton has made “voting rights” the centerpiece of her presidential campaign. Christian Adams reports: In Houston, Hillary made election process rules a focus of her campaign. By process, I mean who votes, when they vote, and how they vote. While Republicans tend to focus on issues, Democrats realize that if they dominate the process of the election, the power to control the issues will follow. Process brings power. Hillary’s »

Obama expounds on racism, superficially

Featured image President Obama said yesterday that “we are not cured of [racism].” He also said that “the legacy of slavery, Jim Crow, discrimination in almost every institution of our lives. . .casts a long shadow and that’s still part of our DNA that’s passed on.” Let’s consider these assertions. The second consists of cliched metaphors (“casts a long shadow” and “part of our DNA”). As such, they are difficult to evaluate. »

Dartmouth alum provides clarity on “torture”

Featured image Robert Grenier served in the CIA for 27 years. In 2001, as station chief in Islamabad, he developed a CIA war plan for southern Afghanistan that relied on Afghans to drive Al Qaeda and Taliban fighters from Kabul and install Hamid Karzai as the country’s new president. He describes these events in a new book called 88 Days to Kandahar. Grenier also helped coordinate covert operations in support of the »

Lack of self-restraint makes CEOs, and capitalism, easy targets

Featured image I’ve heard it said that in the 1950s and early 1960s, doctors often drove Buicks even though they could afford Cadillacs. Maybe they didn’t want to show off. Or maybe they didn’t want to be subjected to the kind of joke that Alfred Hitchcock used in “The Man Who Knew Too Much” when Jimmy Stewart (as a doctor) and Doris Day describe the medical procedures that are paying for their »

Good news from South Carolina [UPDATED]

Featured image As John has noted, the Confederate battle flag is under fire in South Carolina. Sen. Lindsey Graham, Sen. Tim Scott, and Gov. Nikki Haley — Republicans all — have called for it to be removed from the state capitol grounds in Columbia, South Carolina. I agree that it’s time to take the flag down. Not because its presence caused Dylann Roof to kill blacks. It didn’t. Not because removing the »

Playing the victim game in reverse

Featured image In the aftermath of the Charleston massacre, the left, predictably, is looking for racial slights in developments ancillary to the shootings so it can attribute them to “systemic, pervasive racism.” For example, as I discussed here, it complains that Dylann Roof has not sufficiently been branded a terrorist. Two can play this game, and though we are better advised not to, let me try my hand. In 2011, Jared Lee »

Charleston shooting brings out the worst in race-mongering radical profs

Featured image Anthea Butler, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, takes to the pages of the Washington Post to advance the proposition that “racial hatred and white supremacy. . .continue to pervade our society.” She relies mainly on media coverage of the Charleston massacre and other instances of racial violence. In doing so, she commits a series of howlers. For example, Butler argues that “Michael Brown stole cigars. . .and many. »

On the money

Featured image The U.S. Treasury Department has decided that “a woman” will appear on the redesigned ten dollar bill. The image of Alexander Hamilton, who basically created our nation’s financial system, presently graces the ten note. It looks like he will either appear on the reverse side of the bill or find a home on a separate series of tenners. Which woman will supplant Hamilton? Treasury Secretary Jack Lew doesn’t know. He »