Author Archives: Paul Mirengoff

The first gerrymander

Featured image The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, dominated by Democrats, has redrawn the map for congressional districts in that state. It was assisted by a liberal law professor from Stanford. According to Sean Trende, the new map follows reasonable principles — compactness, contiguity, and minimal jurisdictional splits — but within those confines repeatedly makes choices that increase the Democrats odds of winning districts. What a surprise! The bottom line is that instead »

Shocker: Many nations are breaking Paris accord promises

Featured image My views on climate change deviate somewhat from those of John and Steve who, to be fair, know more about the subject than I do. So I might have favored remaining in the Paris Accord if I thought the rest of the world would comply with the promises made therein. However, I had no such confidence. It seemed to me that only a fool would. Now we learn that in »

Does John know about this?

Featured image Several former Miss Universe contestants allege that Donald Trump helped pick the finalists in the days leading up to the competition and made sure to note his business holdings in the nations being represented by his favorites. So reports Jeffrey Toobin in a long New Yorker article (warning: the article is more about Russia than about beauty). According to Toobin: Adwoa Yamoah, who participated in the competition after winning Miss »

Alex Acosta refuses to disturb Obama/Perez pro-illegal immigrant policies

Featured image As described below, Department of Labor policy and practice supports illegal immigrants in at least three ways. This shouldn’t be surprising. Illegal immigrants had no better friend in the Obama administration, and few anywhere in American, than Tom Perez, Obama’s Secretary of Labor. Here is how Perez used the DOL to promote the interests of illegal immigrants. First, an Obama administration-era memorandum of understanding between the DOL, the EEOC, the »

New York Times: Russian meddling was drop in an ocean

Featured image Yesterday, I wrote that Russia’s efforts during the 2016 election season to sow discord in the electorate and to libel certain candidates were surely inconsequential, given the amount of garbage with which Americans themselves contaminate our politics. Suggesting that Russia’s efforts affected the outcome or even, appreciably, the tenor of this election “is like saying that dropping a bucket of water into the sea affected the tide,” I concluded. This »

How amnesty overreach killed relief for “Dreamers”

Featured image On the evening of February 14, I wrote a post called “Senate May Be Perilously Close to Passing Liberal Amnesty Legislation.” The legislation in question was sponsored by the so-called Common Sense Coalition, consisting of eight Republican Senators (Alexander, Collins, Gardner, Graham, Flake, Isakson, Murkowski, and Rounds), seven Democrats, and one Independent. It granted amnesty for nearly two millions “Dreamers” and funded a wall. It did nothing about the diversity »

A silly indictment [UPDATED]

Featured image John, Steve, and Scott have already offered analysis of Robert Mueller’s indictment of Russians. I might as well add mine. I think the indictment is silly. Russia meddled in our presidential election by spreading disinformation in order to erode faith in our democracy and, let’s assume, in the hope of influencing the outcome. Why wouldn’t it? Russia is our adversary, despite Barack Obama’s denial of this reality during much of »

Lenient sentencing legislation clears committee but with mortal wounds

Featured image As expected, the lenient sentencing bill — “The Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act” — pushed by a bipartisan group of Senators cleared the Judiciary Committee this week. Unexpectedly, at least to me, five Republicans voted against it, including Majority Whip John Cornyn, who sponsored the legislation two and a half years ago. The vote was 16-5. In addition to Cornyn, Sens. Hatch, Cruz, Sasse, and Kennedy voted no. Six Republicans »

CIA: Public can’t see classified info given to favored reporters

Featured image Earlier this week, the CIA filed a brief in federal court arguing that it can selectively release classified information to trusted journalists while withholding the same information from other citizens who request it through open records laws. As Will Racke reports for the Daily Caller, the agency claimed that limited disclosures to reporters do not waive national security exemptions to Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests. The case stems from »

“Centrist” amnesty fails in the Senate

Featured image The Senate today rejected the immigration bill proposed by the “Common Sense Coalition” that I described last night. It would have granted amnesty for almost two million “Dreamers” in exchange for watered down border security provisions and nothing on the immigration reform front. The vote to take up the bill was 54-45 (with Sen. McCain unable to vote) — six votes short of the required 60. In reality, it was »

Up in smoke, Part Two

Featured image In a post called “Up in Smoke,” I discussed Sen. Cory Gardner’s decision to put a hold on all pending Justice Department nominees in retaliation for Jeff Sessions’ revocation of a memo issued by the Obama DOJ regarding enforcement of federal law regarding marijuana. The memo in question discouraged federal prosecutors in most cases from bringing charges wherever the drug is legal under state law. Sessions called the memorandum unnecessary »

Grassley accuses Sessions of ingratitude for opposing jailbreak legislation

Featured image Sen. Chuck Grassley has blasted Attorney General Jeff Sessions for criticizing the lenient sentencing legislation Grassley and others are pushing in the Senate. The bill would would slash mandatory minimum sentences for many federal drug crimes and cause the release of many drug felons before they have served their full sentence. Grassley says he’s incensed, and has the right to be, because of what he has done for the Attorney »

Senate may be perilously close to passing liberal amnesty legislation

Featured image Until today, there were two main immigration reform proposals in the Senate. The first: a proposal by Sen. Grassley, and supported by the White House, to grant amnesty to nearly two million “Dreamers” while (a) allocating $25 billion for a wall and other security measures, (b) cutting way back on chain migration, and (c) ending the diversity lottery. The second: a proposal by Sens. Coons and McCain that would grant »

Poll: GOP and Trump are no longer under water

Featured image There’s more good polling news for Republicans today — the best yet in this cycle. A Politico/Morning Consult poll finds that the GOP has pulled, in effect, level with the Dems in the generic congressional poll. 39 percent of registered voters say they would support the GOP candidate for Congress in their district, while 38 percent would back the Democratic candidate. President Trump’s numbers have also improved dramatically, according to »

Moon trot

Featured image Wally Moon died last week. He was an outfielder for the St. Louis Cardinals and the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 1950s and early 60s. Moon was Rookie of the Year in 1954 when, replacing the extraordinarily popular Enos Slaughter in the Cards outfield, he batted .304 and scored 106 runs. In 1957, Moon batted .295 with 24 home runs for St. Louis. Moon is best remembered for his 1959 »

Pretending our way to decline

Featured image I had hoped that the idiotic left-wing outrage at Attorney General Sessions’ use of the term “Anglo-American law enforcement” would dissipate without making it into mainstream discussion. The fact that former President Obama has referred to the Anglo-American nature of our justice system seemed to support my hope. No such luck. This morning, I heard NPR pretend there is a legitimate racism story here. So did ABC News and the »

Trump’s infrastructure program — some pros and cons

Featured image Fulfilling a campaign promise, President Trump has proposed an infrastructure program. He seeks an initial outlay of $200 billion. Half of the money would be a straightforward appropriations outlay for expanding things like digital networks and federal infrastructure loan programs. The other half would be used to induce entice state and local governments to spend more on infrastructure. As the editors of the Weekly Standard explain, the feds would offer »