Author Archives: Paul Mirengoff

“Personal foul, shooting a bow and arrow”

Featured image These are words I never imagined I’d hear from an NFL referee. But that was the call against Washington Redskins corner back Josh Norman yesterday. Don’t get me wrong. Shooting a bow and arrow on a football field should, at a minimum, be a personal foul. Sure, the players have plenty of padding and protection, but not enough to guarantee their safety if shot by an arrow. The problem is »

This day in baseball history — The Dodgers win pennant on final day

Featured image When we last looked in on the 1966 pennant race, it was mid-September. The Los Angeles Dodgers had overcome a mediocre August and moved into first place, two and half games ahead of the Pittsburgh Pirates and three ahead of the San Francisco Giants. In the second half of September, the Dodgers maintained their lead, but couldn’t shake the competition. When Sandy Koufax beat the St. Louis Cardinals 2-1 on »

Mosby vs. Rawlings-Blake — a Baltimore food fight

Featured image A war of words has broken out in Baltimore between Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby. Mosby wants to blame Rawlings-Blake for the rioting that followed Freddie Gray’s death. The mayor has ripped Mosby for rushing to judgment on the six police officers she unsuccessfully prosecuted. Both have good cases. The animosity between the two came to the fore after the New York Times Magazine published a mostly »

Beware of bipartisan grandstanding

Featured image I wouldn’t call the following statement an iron rule, but it’s a good rule of thumb: When congressional Republicans and Democrats overwhelmingly agree on legislation, the legislation is probably bad. That’s the case, in my view, with the bipartisan legislation that enables 9/11 victims and their families to sue the government of Saudi Arabia. Nowadays, “bipartisan” often means that one party supported a bill unanimously and managed to pick up »

Internet giveaway proceeds after court rejects suit to halt it

Featured image We have written about President Obama’s internet giveaway and how GOP congressional leaders effectively rubber stamped it. An aide to Majority Leader McConnell even tried to blame Donald Trump for the Republicans’ gutlessness. After Congress failed to act, four Republican state attorneys general filed a lawsuit to stop the giveaway. The four state plaintiffs were Arizona, Oklahoma, Nevada and Texas. Their AGs are Mark Brnovich, Scott Pruitt, Adam Paul Laxalt, »

Detroit newspaper endorses Gary Johnson

Featured image The Detroit News has been around since 1873. Until now, it has never endorsed a non-Republican for president (it endorsed no one in two of FDR’s races and sat out the Bush-Kerry contest in 2004). This year, though, the Detroit News is has endorsed Gary Johnson for president. Of Donald Trump it says: The 2016 nominee offered by the Republican Party rubs hard against the editorial board’s values as conservatives »

Judge finds Brown failed to give due process to student accused of sexual assualt

Featured image William Smith, the Chief Judge of the U.S. District Court for the District of Rhode Island, has ruled in favor of a Brown University student who was suspended for two years for an alleged sexual assault. Judge Smith ruled that the student did not receive due process. The judge found several defects in the procedures by which Brown tossed the student. For one thing, Brown told the student he would »

Non-citizen murder suspect voted in three elections [UPDATED: status of shooter not clear]

Featured image Arcen Cetin, the Turkish immigrant accused of murdering five strangers at a mall in Washington state, voted in the last three election cycles even though he isn’t a U.S. citizen. So reports KING 5, a Seattle television station. Cetin, who is 20 years old, registered to vote in 2014 and participated in three elections including the May presidential primary. However, Cetin is ineligible to vote because he is not a »

Scott Garrett for Congress

Featured image Scott Garrett doesn’t fit the usual profile for a Power Line pick. Usually, we pick up-and-coming candidates like Tom Cotton, Mia Love, Joni Ernst, and Alex Mooney. Garrett has represented New Jersey’s fifth congressional district since 2003. However, he’s locked in a difficult race this year. Given his strongly conservative record, we are asking our readers to support him. Garrett is a founding member of the House Freedom Caucus. He »

Republican leaders set to rubber stamp Obama’s internet giveaway

Featured image Last week, I asked whether Republican leaders will rubber stamp President Obama’s internet giveaway. My fear was that they would end up backing a continuing resolution that does not include language blocking the transition away from U.S. oversight of the Internet’s domain name system. Without that language, the Obama administration will hand oversight of the domain name system to an international organization. This would create a danger that countries like »

The Ferguson effect in Ferguson

Featured image Newly released figures show that murders increased by 11 percent in the U.S. in 2015. 1,532 more people were murdered last year than the year before. The murder rate (murders per 100,000 population) rose by 10 percent. According to Kent Scheidegger of the Crime and Consequences blog, only twice in more than a half century has the rate jumped double digits in one year. In one other year, the increase »

Keith Lamont Scott’s violent past

Featured image I still don’t know for sure whether, as police say, Keith Lamont Scott was brandishing a weapon when he was shot or, as his wife says, he was unarmed. But the more we learn about Mr. Scott, the more clear it becomes that this was a violent and dangerous man. And as we learn about his wife, we realize that she was one of his victims. I wrote here about »

Lester Holt’s blatantly biased performance

Featured image Donald Trump can’t blame his poor debate performance on Lester Holt. Nor would it be wise for him to try. Biased moderators usually win twice when the victim whines. That’s why Kellyanne Conway shrewdly praised Holt’s performance after the debate. But Holt’s performance was not praiseworthy. Rather, it was a nakedly biased effort to aid Hillary Clinton. The mischief began with the very first question. Holt proclaimed the state of »

Two polls have Clinton winning the debate

Featured image In a CNN poll of debate-watchers, 62 percent thought Clinton won the debate compared to 27 percent for Trump — a 35-point margin. According to Nate Silver, that’s the third-widest margin ever in a CNN or Gallup post-debate poll, which date back to 1984. Only a 1992 debate between Bill Clinton and George H.W. Bush and the first Obama-Romney debate were viewed as more one-sided. Meanwhile, a PPP poll had »

Thoughts on an unpleasant evening

Featured image Well, that was fun — watching two candidates I can’t stand argue for 90-plus minutes and seeing the candidate I dislike more (Hillary Clinton) get the better of it. Why do I think Clinton got the better of it? First, I thought she was more composed. Second, I thought she was on the attack for much of the debate and was able (with the help of the moderator) frequently to »

Trump puts out new list of potential Supreme Court nominees

Featured image Donald Trump has added ten more names to the group people he says exemplify what he’s looking for in a Supreme Court Justice. Previously, he put out a list of eleven such possibilities. I discussed that group here. The new list consists of: Mike Lee — U.S. Senator, Utah Neil Gorsuch — Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit Margaret Ryan — Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals for »

Obama’s Syria policy explained

Featured image In writing about the pathetic efforts of John Kerry to arrange a cease fire in Syria, I’ve referred to the Secretary of State as the village idiot. But what about President Obama? Though his intellect may be overrated, he’s anything but an idiot. Obama is, instead, a clever operator who often thinks several moves ahead of his domestic, though not his foreign, adversaries. Why, then, has U.S. policy paved the »