Author Archives: Scott Johnson

Flynn out

Featured image Paul speculated last night that Lt. General Michael Flynn’s days as President Trump’s National Security Adviser might be numbered and that the number might be low. It turned out that the number was zero. General Flynn submitted his resignation late yesterday after meeting with Trump chief of staff Reince Priebus. The Washington Post has been out front of this story. The Post’s Greg Miller and Phil Rucker report on Flynn’s »

The trouble with Calhoun

Featured image Having previously declared that the name of Calhoun College was to survive the grand renaming project undertaken by the university, President Peter Salovey was at pains to explain why the university had changed its mind. What was once Calhoun College is now to be Hopper College. What happened? Roger Kimball explores the question in the Wall Street Journal column “Yale’s inconsistent name-dropping” (accessible here via Google). In the column Roger »

Al Jarreau, RIP

Featured image I am so sad to observe the passing of the singer Al Jarrreau today in Los Angeles at the age of 76. Matt Schudel does a good job of paying tribute to Al in the Washington Post obituary . Margalit Fox provides a more ambivalent take in the New York Times obituary. I want to add a local note on Al’s death. Al was a native of Milwaukee. Once he »

Thinkin’ about “Lincoln” again

Featured image Steven Spielberg’s 2012 film Lincoln seems to have dropped from our cultural consciousness. Perhaps the cognitive dissonance it induces on the left suppresses its memory. As we celebrate the anniversary of Lincoln’s birthday today, I want to take a look back at the film with the notes I offered at the time. I put just about everything important that I know about Lincoln into them. Until reading David Brooks’s obtuse »

Remembering Mr. Lincoln

Featured image Today is of course the anniversary of the birth of America’s greatest president, Abraham Lincoln. As a politician and as president, Lincoln was a profound student of the Constitution and constitutional history. Perhaps most important, Lincoln was America’s indispensable teacher of the moral ground of political freedom at the exact moment when the country was on the threshold of abandoning what he called its “ancient faith” that all men are »

What was once Calhoun College is now…

Featured image Yale’s Calhoun College is one of the university’s venerable residential colleges. It’s named after the prominent alumnus John C. Calhoun. Calhoun served as Vice President, Secretary of State, Secretary of War, and United States Senator. He was the also the leading Southern proponent of slavery until his death in 1850. Calhoun is most famous for his advocacy of slavery as a “positive good.” The man did a lot of damage. »

Martin Karo: Analyze this

Featured image It’s hard to keep up with the news in the early weeks of the Trump administration. Reader Martin Karo writes to note one story we have overlooked so far. He observes that the Daily Caller seems to be the go-to site on the story, with this excellent February 7 update as well as the February 4 report linked below. Mr. Karo titles this “We were in the very best of »

Berkeley then and now

Featured image The Manhattan Institute’s Heather Mac Donald must recently have visited the Berkeley campus of the University of California. In her Winter 2017 City Journal essay “From culture to cupcakes,” Heather takes note of two long quotations in Bauhaus-era typography that adorn the facade of Berkeley Law, as the law school now calls itself. On the left is a passage by Supreme Court Justice Benjamin Cardozo, from a 1925 speech at »

Somebody get me out of here

Featured image The federal courts of appeals routinely operate in randomly assigned panels of three judges. Appeals from their decisions may be taken to the United States Supreme Court and are heard mostly as a matter of the Supreme Court’s discretion. When a federal appellate decision conflicts with a previous decision of the same court, or with a decision of the United States Supreme Court, or (more rarely) presents a question of »

Mrs. Warren’s profession revisited

Featured image Perhaps the main count in Elizabeth Warren’s indictment of the then prospective confirmation of Betsy DeVos as Secretary of Education was DeVos’s support for school choice. Warren charged that it may well even have “disqualified” DeVos from the position: Warren pointed to what she called DeVos’ “deep record of activism, bankrolling and lobbying for policies that would privatize public education” without meaningful accountability. “Your history of support for policies that »

A Ninth Circuit footnote [With Comment by John] [Updated]

Featured image The Ninth Circuit has ruled against the Trump administration’s motion for a stay pending appeal of Judge Robart’s order restraining the Trump administration from enforcing the executive order calling a brief timeout on the admission of refugees from seven designated countries (a/k/a “travel ban”) in the Ninth Circuit just concluded. This can’t be a surprise to anyone who tuned in to the oral argument of the motion. The Ninth Circuit »

Thoughts from the ammo line

Featured image Ammo Grrrll continues her post-election series in GET A GRIP! Part 3 – VIRTUE SIGNALING WITHOUT THE VIRTUE. She writes: One of the most unnerving aspects of the Great Democrat Freakout has been the astonishing level of nastiness unleashed. Like lynch mobs everywhere, the larger the audience, the more unhinged the behavior of individuals in the crowd. An aging, has-been singer shrieks her fantasy of blowing up the White House. »

Bill Cooper passes and inspires

Featured image As chairman and chief executive officer of TCF Financial Corporation (as it became), Bill Cooper rescued the Minnesota-based bank holding company essentially from insolvency and built it into to a regional powerhouse. I had the great good fortune to work for Bill and TCF general counsel Greg Pulles in the TCF legal department for 12 years. Bill died yesterday at the age of 73. I want to add a personal »

Keith Ellison’s back pages

Featured image I’ve been writing about Keith Ellison since he was endorsed by the DFL Fifth District convention to succeed Rep. Martin Sabo in the spring of 2006. I wrote some 20 Power Line posts under the heading “Who is Keith Ellison?” I summarized my findings in the Weekly Standard article “Louis Farrakhan’s first congressman” and in the companion Power Line post “Keith Ellison for dummies.” When Ellison published his 2014, memoir »

Mother Jones is with you

Featured image Power Line readers who mischievously pull for Minnesota Fifth District Rep. Keith Ellison to emerge victorious in his bid for the chairmanship of the DNC are not alone. We have noted that former Obama administration green jobs commissar and Mao man Van Jones is with you. We have noted that Vox’s Matthew Yglesias has joined you. We have also noted that 300 Jewish leaders are with you. The editors of »

In the Ninth Circuit

Featured image The oral argument of the Trump administration’s motion for a stay pending appeal of Judge Robart’s order restraining the Trump administration from enforcing the executive order calling a brief timeout on the admission of refugees from seven designated countries (a/k/a “travel ban”) in the Ninth Circuit just concluded. The Ninth Circuit made the oral argument accessible by live stream. To no one’s surprise, the oral argument did not go well »

The Audi factor

Featured image The “wage gap” between men and women is such an old canard that it could be coeval with the birth of (real) fake news. With their sure grasp on the exploitation of ignorance, Democrats have turned it into a perduring plank in the “war on women” allegedly waged by Republicans. Thomas Sowell has devoted several columns to debunking it. He calls the “wage gap” a “lie that won’t die.” Where »