Author Archives: Scott Johnson

Getting ready for D-Day

Featured image My Dartmouth classmate John Floberg is now a distinguished Twin Cities neurologist. We took Professor Peter Bien’s freshman seminar on Politics and the Novel together during our first term at the college. John is originally from Chicago but we reconnected in the Twin Cities through Power Line 40 years after our studies with Professor Bien. John served as a commissioned Navy officer after our graduation. I didn’t realize he was »

The ordeal of Omaha Beach

Featured image Reader Patti Kruse writes to say she “was surprised to see no mention that today is the 72nd anniversary of the D-Day landings on the beaches of Normandy….My dad landed on Omaha Beach on D-Day. He was one of the fortunate ones, as he was never physically injured and managed to survive from D-Day all the way through the Battle of the Bulge and V-E Day. He rarely spoke about »

Ms. Psaki corrects

Featured image The now famous exchange on video between FOX News reporter James Rosen with then State Department spokesman Jen Psaki was sent down the memory hole by someone at the State Department. The exchange homed in on the administration’s deceit regarding negotiations with the Islamic Republic of Iran. Whoever dun it with the video at the State Department archives was likely acting at the behest of someone else in the Obama »

The tiger, beyond a reasonable doubt

Featured image The New York Times pioneered the form of the story portraying the suffering of favored groups (i.e., groups they favor). Comedian Mort Sahl has been credited with the satirical headline that captures the form with his version of the New York Times’s take on the apocalypse: “World ends, women & minorities hardest hit.” In “Terrorist wannabes guilty, Somalis hardest hit,” I linked to stories published by the Star Tribune and »

Terrorist wannabes guilty, Somalis hardest hit

Featured image We are all painfully familiar with the journalistic genre portraying the suffering of favored groups. That would be groups favored by the journalists. The satirical headline that captures the genre gives us the New York Times’s take on the apocalypse: “World ends, women & minorities hardest hit.” Credit is due to someone for the shaft of light cast by that parody headline. NewsBusters credits comedian Mort Sahl, still going strong »

Cheryl Mills would prefer not to

Featured image Kim Strassel has read the transcript of the deposition of Cheryl Mills in the case brought by Judicial Watch against the State Department under the Freedom of Information Act. Although the transcript runs to 270 pages, it can’t have taken long to review. It also can’t have been a pleasant experience. Strassel reports: The entire 270-page transcript of the deposition, which Judicial Watch released Tuesday, has an almost eye-glazing repetition »

CRB: Song of Troy

Featured image The origins of the Iliad and the Odyssey are shrouded in mystery, or just shrouded, but this much we know. They are two of the greatest poems ever composed. New translations by Robert Fagles with introductions by Bernard Knox were something of an event in the publishing world when they appeared in 1990 and 1996. I saw Fagles chant a portion of his translation of the Iliad before a packed »

“Minnesota men” go to trial: The jury returns

Featured image At 1:30 this afternoon the jury delivered its verdict in the case of the three “Minnesota men” charged with conspiracy to provide material support to ISIS and conspiracy to commit murder overseas. The jury found the three men guilty on all counts with the exception of one perjury charge against Abdirahman Daud. (Daud gave a Clintonian response to an inartfully asked question before the grand jury. The Clintonian approach earned »

Across the border

Featured image At the Washington Times Stephen Dinan has a timely scoop that highlights the national security implications of our porous border with Mexico. Dinan reports: A smuggling network has managed to sneak illegal immigrants from Middle Eastern terrorism hotbeds straight to the doorstep of the U.S., including helping one Afghan who authorities say was part of an attack plot in North America. Immigration officials have identified at least a dozen Middle »

CRB: Killers, saviors, heroes

Featured image Aristotle wrote a great book — the greatest? — on human greatness, The Nichomachean Ethics. Following in Aristotle’s footsteps, Professor Robert Faulkner wrote The Case for Greatness: Honorable Ambition and Its Critics. Now Tod Lindberg has returned our attention to the subject in The Heroic Heart: Greatness Ancient and Modern. Who better to review Lindberg’s book than Professor Faulkner? He does so in “Killers, saviors, heroes.” Professor Faulkner finds Lindberg’s »

Thoughts from the ammo line

Featured image Ammo Grrrll asks a simple question: FIRST CLASS? She also gives Steve and me our shot at immortalization in poetry: Sorry, dear readers. I simply cannot write about politics again this week without losing what’s left of my mind. I’ll be back again next week at Full Ferocity. Probably. Besides, my original mission, should I decide to accept it, was to be funny… This column is brought to you by »

“Minnesota men” go to trial (20)

Featured image The prosecution and defense made their closing arguments to the jury on Tuesday and Wednesday. Judge Davis instructed the jury and submitted the case to them with separate verdict forms for each of the three defendants. The charges include a total of ten counts. I would guess the jury will until the middle of next week. The Star Tribune’s Stephen Montemayor gives relatively straightforward accounts of the closings here (May »

Hillary hacked?

Featured image The release of the State Department Inspector Generals’s report on Hillary Clinton’s use of a private server during her tenure as Secretary of State has blasted several of her talking points from the discussion. One can hear the new, pared down version in the video below of the MSNBC interview during which she evades the question whether the FBI has contacted her for an interview. “No, we do not have »

CRB: Respecting the respectable

Featured image We continue our preview of the new issue of the Claremont Review of Books courtesy of our friends at the Claremont Institute. I have chosen one essay and three reviews for your consideration, but I had a hard time choosing among the riches on offer in the new issue. You can do your own choosing at the heavily subsidized price of $19.95 a year. Subscribe by clicking on Subscription Services »

Dartmouth and double standards

Featured image In the apocalyptic satire Dr. Strangelove, President Merkin Muffley meets with his military advisors as they seek to recall a bomber on its way to dropping the big one on the Soviet Union. President Muffley invites the Soviet ambassador into the War Room to join the discussion. When fight breaks out between the Russian ambassador and General Buck Turgidson at the Pentagon, President Muffley exclaims: “Gentlemen, you can’t fight in »

CRB: What’s at stake

Featured image The new issue of the Claremont Review of Books is in the mail and, thanks to our friends at the Claremont Institute, I have read it in galley to select four articles and reviews to be submitted for the consideration of Power Line readers. I had a hard time choosing! You, however, can do your own choosing at the heavily subsidized price of $19.95 a year. At that price the »

Dartmouth undone

Featured image It turns out that rendering “they” a singular pronoun is not Dartmouth President Phil Hanlon’s greatest outrage against common sense in favor of the contortions of political correctness. It’s not even his greatest recent outrage. That distinction must go to Hanlon’s toleration of the rampage by BlackLivesMatter thugs through Dartmouth’s Baker Library as students studied for exams. At Dartblog Joe Asch reports: “No charges for BLM confirmed (again).” It is »