Author Archives: Steven Hayward

The Mask Slips on the Climate Scam

Featured image Forget the scientific argument over climate change for the moment, or for that matter, assume that climate catastrophe is a certainty for purposes of discussion.  From the beginning the climatistas and their media cheerleaders have confined all policy discussion to one single track: suppress fossil fuels, even though no affordable, scalable substitutes for hydrocarbon energy are in sight. The practical ideas for the suppression of hydrocarbon energy have taken two »

Does Indiana Signal the End of Liberalism?

Featured image The “end of liberalism” can be taken to have two meanings, reflecting the ambiguity of both “end” and “liberalism.” “End” can mean the final or logical destination of an idea—the goal, if not its perfection (think telos); or it can mean that something is finished, over and done with, gone forever. And “liberalism” is a confused term in modern times. It originally stood for individual liberty, and was the cornerstone »

Blogging Ben Flogs the Market

Featured image This week former Fed chief Ben Bernanke started a blog hosted by the Brookings Institution, and his first week of posts concerns the subject of—wait for it now, I know it will come as a big surprise . . . interest rates. In the first of a series of three posts this week, Helicopter Ben makes the point that interest rates are driven chiefly by economic fundamentals. Well knock me »

The Week in Pictures: Deal or No Deal Edition

Featured image Listening to the Obama administration trying to spin their Iran “framework” faster than a uranium centrifuge makes me think we’d be better off with Woody Allen as secretary of state rather than John Kerry; at least when Allen tells us he’s looking for “a framework to turn a concept into an idea,” we know he’s pulling our leg.  The Obama team really seem to believe their own B.S. And finally. »

Fred Siegel Explains It All, Part 3

Featured image In this third installment, Fred extends his observations on the Vietnam controversies in the 1960s, the rise of feminism, and current Israeli politics (this video was taped before the recent election).  He also comments on his time with the Democratic Leadership Council, and Michael Walzer of Dissent.  He concludes with some choice comments on Howard Dean and John Kerry.  About 7:30 long: »

Some Indiana Interrogatories

Featured image The whole Indiana RFRA controversy prompts a few interrogatories.  Such as: • If a member of the Westboro Baptist Church asks for a bakery to create a cake with their motto “God hates fags,” will the baker be charged with discrimination if she refuses? • If a baker agrees to bake a cake for a gay wedding, but as matter of practice includes the slogan “God hates fags” in, say, »

Green Weenie of the Week Needs “Corrections”

Featured image I know it’s only the first day of the month—and April Fools’ Day (which was probably intended with goofy environmentalists in mind)—but despite stiff competition we can award a coveted Green Weenie Award already. There’s stiff competition, though. The presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church, Katherine Jefferts Schori, has issued the pronouncement that ignoring climate change is a sin. Yes, come to think of it, I never hear anything about »

“Economics Is a Form of Brain Damage”

Featured image That slogan, which you can see on display in this 1993 full-page New York Times ad nearby, is making a comeback of sorts on the left. A generation ago it was the slogan of the environmental left, which hates the fact that we live in a world of tradeoffs, and which thinks we live in a world where the only unlimited resource is other people’s money. The late David Brower »

How Long Can Noah Tread Water?

Featured image The Daily Show has announced little known South African comic Trevor Noah as Jon Stewart’s replacement, and going with an unknown talent is an understandable move for such an iconic show. (Some initial media reports predictably referred to this South African as “African-American” because they’re afraid to say “black,” because PC.) But speaking of PC and compromised comics, the furor that has erupted over some of Noah’s old un-PC tweets »

“Genderflect” With Pep Boys!

Featured image I’m too old to stay up for Saturday Night Live any more, but I wish I had been able to monitor the outrage on social media among the Social Justice Warrior set this last weekend, when SNL took down both Starbucks and the whole swollen transgenderism fetish in one fell swoop. If you missed it too, it is definitely worth two minutes of your time for this: »

The Peerless Pitfalls of Peer Review

Featured image Back finally to an old topic leftover from the climate inquisition a few weeks back. One of our lefty commenters thought it important to raise the issue that I don’t publish “peer-reviewed” articles about climate issues in the academic literature, which is true. It’s something I have in common with Al Gore. (Heh.) Besides, I prefer to write in plain English for human beings rather than the 10 people who »

Fred Siegel Explains It All, Part 2

Featured image In this second installment of our conversation with Fred Siegel, we explore Fred’s roots as a “social democrat” as it was meant in the postwar era (or until, as Fred explains, the New Left destroyed it in the 1960s), and the evolution of his views because of the Vietnam War, his tutelage under Irving Howe at Dissent magazine, and his thoughts about the “Frankfurt School”—a leftist sect of the early »

The Week in Pictures: Centrifugal Farce Edition

Featured image Hard to know just what story merits top billing this weekend: Who Lost Yemen? Saving Private Bergdahl?  Harry Reid entering the past tense?  Or the continuing embarrassment of the Obama administration’s Iran diplomacy? (And these folks thought Reagan’s dealings with Iran were naive and irresponsible. . .) The world burns and the storm continues to gather. . .  (Headline hat tip: RS.)   Yes, it’s been a long photo lineup »

Fred Siegel Explains It All, Part 1

Featured image We recently spent two hours conversing with the great historian Fred Siegel, author of several fine books, including most recently The Revolt Against the Masses: How Liberalism Has Undermined the Middle Class (coming out soon in paperback with additional material).  We range widely, Brian Lamb-style, over the whole of his life and career, and we’ll be rolling out highlights in short installments over the next few weeks.  I had some »

Americans to Environmentalists: Yawn

Featured image Gallup is out with its annual poll of environmental issues.  I’ll just go with their headline: In the U.S., Concern About Environmental Threats Eases Among the key findings: Consistent with the decline in worry about specific environmental problems, Americans have become more positive about the quality of the environment in recent years. If Americans perceive the environment to be in relatively good shape, it follows they would be less concerned about potential »

Start a Government in Exile This Summer?

Featured image Two current controversies combine to suggest . . . a summer vacation idea! The Pacific Research Institute’s indefatigable leader Sally Pipes speculated some time ago that if the government continues to wreck health care with regulation and mandates, perhaps the answer would be offshore health clinics and hospitals—not like “offshore” banks in the Caymans or something, but offshore on ships, beyond the territorial boundaries of the United States, therefore making »

Higher Ed Bubblegum?

Featured image Glenn Reynolds (among others) likes to write about the “higher education bubble.”  But maybe we’ve all missed higher education bubblegum?  With all of the difficulties law schools are having right now with declining enrollment (applications off overall by more than 50 percent from 10 years ago), it is good to know that at least Touro Law School has it’s priorities straight: Billy Joel and the Law: A Touro Law Conference »