Author Archives: Steven Hayward

Bottom Story of the Week

Featured image The New Republic, with its punk owner Chris Hughes having locked the cockpit door, continues its rapid decompression and descent into the mountainside.  This week TNR carries a piece saying that the Rolling Stone UVA rape hoax story is the fault of . . . conservatives. The story (and “story” it is) by Elizabeth Stoker Brunig shows what an expensive college education in postmodern theory gets you these days: Pinning »

Charles K. With Charles K.

Featured image The latest installment of the Claremont Institute’s “American Mind” video series features Claremont Review editor Charles Kesler in conversation with the other great Charles K—Charles Krauthammer.  I have been encouraging Krauthammer to write an intellectual autobiography, and in this episode reviews the development of his thought, with the mild surprise of the importance of John Stuart Mill in Krauthammer’s thinking. About 15 minutes long: »

Red States and High Tides

Featured image I’m not sure who was the first to point out that income inequality is highest where liberals govern, i.e., New York City, San Francisco, LA, etc.  It’s also true of housing prices, not coincidentally.  This is only the beginning of a pattern recognition linked to liberal governance and elite opinion formation. The folks at Yale have done an extensive public opinion survey on climate change broken down by county, and »

Don’t Look Now, But. . .

Featured image The Wall Street Journal has two items of special note today.  The first is a good article on the debate between Ben Bernanke and Larry Summers about how to understand our low interest rate environment: For more than a year, Mr. Summers has advanced the theory that “secular stagnation” is to blame: a chronic shortfall in demand. Mr. Bernanke disagrees, blaming a combination of cyclical and special factors. They both »

The Traitor Tribe?

Featured image Harvard’s Laurence Tribe, you may recall, was one of the leaders of the mob that crushed Robert Bork’s 1987 Supreme Court nomination, and is one of the leading fixtures of the Left in legal academia. And one of the more remarkable documents you’ll ever read that reveals the protean constitutionalism of the Left is Tribe’s 1989 Harvard Law Review article entitled “The Curvature of Constitutional Space: What Lawyers Can Learn »

Media Alert: Bill Bennett Tomorrow Morning

Featured image For early risers in the middle and western regions of the country, and for commuters on the east coast, I’ll be a guest on Bill Bennett’s “Morning in America” radio show tomorrow at 8:05 am eastern time, to discuss the latest in climate change and my Wall Street Journal article today on how to box in Obama ahead of the next UN climate change summit in Paris next fall.  We »

Fred Siegel Explains It All, Part 5

Featured image Today voters in Chicago are at the polls voting in the mayoral runoff between “Rahmbo” Emanuel and a candidate much further to his left, Jesus “Chuy” Garcia, in what has been a surprisingly tight race.  Emanuel may very well lose, to someone who might make de Blasio look moderate by comparison.  One thing is certain: turnout will be very very low.  This is increasingly typical of urban politics today, and Fred »

A Rolling Stone Gathers No Facts

Featured image I can’t add much to what John observed here last night about Rolling Stone’s egregious and false UVA rape story, but I couldn’t let a great headline go to waste (hat tip: RS). Actually I can add one observation: this is hardly the first time we’ve seen the media taken in by its overwhelming ideological confirmation bias. Just cast your mind back to 1981, as I recounted in my Age of »

The Asia Bank Freakout

Featured image Lost amidst the news of the Iran deal is a simmering controversy—actually more like a total Establishment freakout—over China’s initiative to start the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB), which China would dominate. It appears to be an attempt by China to set up a regional international finance structure to rival the U.S.-dominated World Bank and International Monetary Fund. The U.S. opposes this initiative, because it supposedly threatens to upset the »

Fred Siegel Explains It All, Part 4

Featured image In his latest book Revolt Against the Masses, Fred Siegel offers a novel explanation for the roots and character of modern liberalism—one that differs substantially from my own in many ways.  On page 28 of the book he says, “Modern liberalism was born of a discontinuity, a rejection of Progressivism.”  In this installment of our conversation, Fred explains some key parts of his argument here, and he makes a good »

The Mask Slips on the Climate Scam

Featured image Forget the scientific argument over climate change for the moment, or for that matter, assume that climate catastrophe is a certainty for purposes of discussion.  From the beginning the climatistas and their media cheerleaders have confined all policy discussion to one single track: suppress fossil fuels, even though no affordable, scalable substitutes for hydrocarbon energy are in sight. The practical ideas for the suppression of hydrocarbon energy have taken two »

Does Indiana Signal the End of Liberalism?

Featured image The “end of liberalism” can be taken to have two meanings, reflecting the ambiguity of both “end” and “liberalism.” “End” can mean the final or logical destination of an idea—the goal, if not its perfection (think telos); or it can mean that something is finished, over and done with, gone forever. And “liberalism” is a confused term in modern times. It originally stood for individual liberty, and was the cornerstone »

Blogging Ben Flogs the Market

Featured image This week former Fed chief Ben Bernanke started a blog hosted by the Brookings Institution, and his first week of posts concerns the subject of—wait for it now, I know it will come as a big surprise . . . interest rates. In the first of a series of three posts this week, Helicopter Ben makes the point that interest rates are driven chiefly by economic fundamentals. Well knock me »

The Week in Pictures: Deal or No Deal Edition

Featured image Listening to the Obama administration trying to spin their Iran “framework” faster than a uranium centrifuge makes me think we’d be better off with Woody Allen as secretary of state rather than John Kerry; at least when Allen tells us he’s looking for “a framework to turn a concept into an idea,” we know he’s pulling our leg.  The Obama team really seem to believe their own B.S. And finally. »

Fred Siegel Explains It All, Part 3

Featured image In this third installment, Fred extends his observations on the Vietnam controversies in the 1960s, the rise of feminism, and current Israeli politics (this video was taped before the recent election).  He also comments on his time with the Democratic Leadership Council, and Michael Walzer of Dissent.  He concludes with some choice comments on Howard Dean and John Kerry.  About 7:30 long: »

Some Indiana Interrogatories

Featured image The whole Indiana RFRA controversy prompts a few interrogatories.  Such as: • If a member of the Westboro Baptist Church asks for a bakery to create a cake with their motto “God hates fags,” will the baker be charged with discrimination if she refuses? • If a baker agrees to bake a cake for a gay wedding, but as matter of practice includes the slogan “God hates fags” in, say, »

Green Weenie of the Week Needs “Corrections”

Featured image I know it’s only the first day of the month—and April Fools’ Day (which was probably intended with goofy environmentalists in mind)—but despite stiff competition we can award a coveted Green Weenie Award already. There’s stiff competition, though. The presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church, Katherine Jefferts Schori, has issued the pronouncement that ignoring climate change is a sin. Yes, come to think of it, I never hear anything about »