Author Archives: Steven Hayward

Cruz Control?

Featured image Of the entire GOP presidential field, I think the candidate with the best or most substantive grasp of the constitutional defects of the administrative state—the term for our unaccountable “fourth branch” of government that increasingly governs us without our consent—is Ted Cruz. (If Tom Cotton were running for president, he’d get the clear nod on this point, but perhaps some day. . .) At the very least, Cruz knows enough »

Perry Sense

Featured image While Donald Trump continues to get disproportionate attention for his correctly grounded—if not well formulated—attacks on out of control immigration, Texas Gov. Rick Perry is quietly emerging as a much more serious candidate. Worth catching the excerpts of his remarks on race and economic opportunity that he delivered at the National Press Club last Thursday. The Wall Street Journal editorializes on it today: [Perry’s] remarks are far more than a »

P.C. Penalty Flag

Featured image I thought a long time ago that the Confederate battle flag shouldn’t fly over state capitols and that it was overdue to come down, but of course the complete purge against the Confederate flag anywhere in any form that is currently under way is about much more than the appropriateness of the flag over civic spaces. When you’re taking the flag off of the General Lee, or whatever that car »

Don’t Look Now But . . . China?

Featured image While everyone was getting on his Great American Barbecue yesterday for the July 4th holiday and awaiting the Greek referendum today, the Chinese stock market was crashing again. It’s down 12 percent over the last week, almost 30 percent in the last month. Tyler Cowen is on it, with a simple message: Greece is small; China is large. Uh oh. From behind the FT’s paywall: The Shanghai index is firmly »

For the 4th: Old-Fashioned American Story Telling from . . . LA?

Featured image People knock LA for not having a real literary culture. “What happens to civilization when it hangs its hat in LA?”, asks longtime Power Line friend Christopher Flannery today on the debut of the new site Even in LA.  The site offers old fashioned—that is, patriotic—short story telling. Beauty in a man or a country is the outward glow of inward goodness. It is the goodness that is most worthy »

How Are We Having This Conversation?

Featured image Lo and behold, the New York Times has finally branched out into satire. The following interview appeared on July 2 at their Opinionator blog site: George Yancy: I’d like to begin with an observation — maybe an obvious one — that the task of engaging race or whiteness in philosophy has been taken up almost exclusively by nonwhite philosophers. My sense is that this is partly because whiteness is a »

The Week in Pictures: Human Events Edition

Featured image When in the course of human events, it becomes necessary to explain to a candid world how Independence Day became Dependence Day, well. . . it’s a long story. There’s only one thing to do: as Churchill said, “Keep buggering on.” (Question: Can we still say “buggering”? I’m badly confused about this. Either “buggering” is now wholly approved, or banned as an archaic macroaggression.) Happy 4th everybody. Go light a »

Churchill on “A Peculiar Type of Brainy People”

Featured image As with so many other things, Churchill was on to the problem of the administrative state and today’s presumptuous liberal cosmopolitanism from early on.  A 1933 speech offers a perfect description of our Beltway mentality today: The worst difficulties from which we suffer do not come from without. They come from within. They do not come from the cottages of the wage-earners. They come from a peculiar type of brainy »

Climate Then and Now

Featured image From volume 4 of Churchill’s Marlborough: His Life and Times, about the winter of 1708-9, near the culmination of the long war against Louis XIV: But there now fell upon France a new and frightful misfortune. Since the beginning of December there had been a hard and almost unbroken frost. On January 6, after a brief thaw, it set in again with a bitterness so intense that two days later »

What Real Feminism Looks Like

Featured image In these days of such confusion over everything having to do with gender and sex, it is a relief to be able to bring you this public service announcement. From RightWingNews, it’s The 20 Hottest Conservative Women in the New Media for 2015. There are a couple of friends of Power Line on the list, and if you haven’t kept up with this non-Trumped up pageant, there are helpful links »

Does Global Warming Cause Transgenderism?

Featured image Over the years it has been a familiar trope to point to examples of homosexuality in certain non-human species as a way of reinforcing the normality of it in homo sapiens, but why isn’t our Latin species name sufficient poof proof? And is “transgenderism” really an ism? Whatever. Anyway, what to make, then, of this story from the current issue of Nature magazine: Sex reversal triggers the rapid transition from »

Why the Trump Bump?

Featured image So Donald Trump is surging in the polls, despite the near-universal scorn of the party establishment, the media, and most conservative leaders. Everyone hates The Donald, it seems, except, you know, actual voters. More than a few of our loyal commenters here have pushed back against our criticisms of Trump. The real surprise would be if Trump hadn’t surged in the polls. Americans of all parties, but especially conservatives and »

What Obama Could Learn from the EU

Featured image What do the Greek crisis and the arms negotiations in Iran have in common? We keep extending the deadline and talking further in deference to the crazy people causing the problem. Only in the case of Greece, the EU has finally reached a point of “No” and meaning it, stopping the socialist centrifuge reducing the Greek economy to its constitutent parts. But the Obama foreign policy titans continue to extend »

The Candidates and Their Reading Lists

Featured image Forget Jeb’s and Hillary’s tax returns. We get it: they both make a lot of money from speeches and such. More interesting is what they read, or claim to read. Last year The Atlantic put together a list of Jeb’s and Hillary’s current book list. In one sense it doesn’t much matter whether they actually read the books they list; more revealing is what they chose to disclose. Here’s Hillary’s »

Green Weenie of the Month: The CBD

Featured image Finally got a shipment of fresh, fully-glutenated, animal-tested Green Weenie Awards from our Chinese manufacturer, and we’re behind on our award roster. But thanks to a tip from WattsUpWithThat, we have a clear winner already: The Center for Biological Diversity. They’re the folks who essentially run our endangered species policy. More on all that some other time. For now, they win our coveted Green Weenie Award for this press release »

The Road Ahead for Believers: Not So Gay

Featured image I’ll have a lot more to say in here and in several other venues about the status of religious liberty and religious faith in post-modern and post-Obergefell America.  But for now it is worth recalling the observations of Richard John Neuhaus, from his important 1984 book The Naked Public Square: When the democratically affirmed institutions that generate and transmit values are excluded, the vacuum will be filled by the agent »

Unabomber or Unapapa?

Featured image Anyone remember the good old days when you couldn’t tell the difference between the Unabomber’s manifesto “Industrial Society and Its Future” and Al Gore’s Earth in the Balance? There was even an online quiz you could flunk. (Though to remind everyone once again, both owed more to Heidegger.) Well, it’s time to rerun that drill with Pope Francis’s encyclical on the environment. Which is exactly what Colby Cosh does in »