Author Archives: Steven Hayward

Climate: Better Put Some Ice on That

Featured image The climatistas have long been fond of warning us about “tipping points,” which will unleash a torrent of “perfect storms,” or some other mashup of overused clichés.  Blink, and you’ll miss them. (Sorry, couldn’t help it.)  Al Gore famously predicted that we’d have an ice-free arctic by this year if we did nothing. Now one problem with letting climate clichés do your thinking for you is that there’s a very »

The Week in Pictures: Mother’s Day Edition

Featured image Mother’s Day isn’t officially being observed until next weekend, but Mother’s Day came a week ahead of time in Baltimore, where real fathers seem to be as scarce as city fathers. Plus we got the lowest-attended major league baseball game in history. Bruce Jenner is the new honorary chair of Women’s Republican Clubs, to the supreme annoyance of the Diversity Enforcers everywhere. And Hillary has a challenger: Go Bernie! And »

What We Have to Look Forward To

Featured image November 2016 is a long way off.  A reminder of what’s ahead: »

Dogmatism Rightly Understood

Featured image Last weekend I got to spend some time with a bunch of impressive students that the Intercollegiate Studies Institute (ISI) rounded up for one of their periodic leadership conferences, this time in Casper, Wyoming. One of the things I shared with the assembled students (who were really really bright) was my short list of indispensable essays or parts of classic books that everyone should re-read at least annually. My list »

The Binks Awakens!

Featured image Are any of you other geeks out there looking forward to the new Star Wars films as much as I am?  I regard it as a good sign that J.J. Abrams took on the franchise, despite having gotten hopelessly lost with Lost. His reboot of Star Trek turned out rather well I thought (please spare me any more Jean Luc Piccard and his UN General Assembly sensibilities).  Besides, George Lucas »

Stalinism Abroad and at Home

Featured image Here are three photos of good old-fashioned Stalinist architecture, but only two of them are from former Communist countries. See if you can spot the one from here at home, and guess where.  (Answer key below.) »

The End in Vietnam, 40 Years On

Featured image There are surprisingly few recollections under way today of the final ignominious chapter of our Vietnam agony, when the U.S. was chased out of Saigon.  I wonder if there isn’t a larger subtext here.  We not only seem to be re-running the 1960s at home right now (Ferguson, Baltimore, etc), but we seem to be trying to re-run 1970s foreign policy too, with American retreat leading to chaos, instability, and »

A Global Cooling Reminder

Featured image The Wall Street Journal‘s “Notable and Quotable” feature offers today a reminder not only of the climate “consensus” of the 1970s, but also the familiar language about the signs and wonders and the certainty of scientists about how global cooling was upon us. From Time magazine, June 24, 1974, just because: As they review the bizarre and unpredictable weather pattern of the past several years, a growing number of scientists »

The Climatistas Are Quaking

Featured image For the latest example of climate change fanaticism, look no further than Newsweek yesterday (how is Newsweek still a thing at all?), where we are solemnly told that . . . wait for it now . . . climate change caused the Nepal earthquake: “This effect could certainly have made the Nepal earthquake come sooner,” says Professor Roland Burgmann, of the Department of Earth and Planetary Science at the University »

Iranian Piracy: Nothing Happens for No Good Reason

Featured image I’ve had occasion before to mention the maxim of my late teacher of international affairs, Harold Rood, that “nothing happens for no good reason.”  (By the way, there’s a brand new book out about Rood’s idiosyncratic method of understanding international affairs: You Run the Show or the Show Runs You: Capturing Harold W. Rood’s Strategic Thought for a New Generation, by J.D. Crouch II and Patrick J. Garrity. More about »

The Long View on Baltimore

Featured image Does it seem like we’re re-running the 1960s, with rolling riots and liberals talking about “root causes” again? Bill DeBlasio is playing the John Lindsay role in New York quite ably, and Baltimore mayor Rawlings-Blake offered a decent reprise of Hubert Humphrey’s infamous remark that if he’d been born in a ghetto, he might start a riot too. How long until the New York Review of Books runs a diagram »

Berkeley Daze

Featured image Fun time last night at the Institute for Governmental Studies at Berkeley, talking about whether Obama is “unleashed” or a “lame duck.”  Fellow panelists were Tom Mann (insert melodrama boos and hisses here), Cathleen Decker of the Los Angeles Times, and Ann O’Leary, a senior adviser to the Hillary Clinton campaign.  O’Leary was very pleasant and engaging in the ordinary sense, but I noticed a rash on my right arm »

The Limits of Liberalism?

Featured image Utopiastic liberal enclaves (usually college towns like Boulder, Berkeley, Cambridge, etc.) pride themselves on their enlightened caring and sharing mentality, their generosity toward the oppressed and underprivileged, etc.  The residents are always happily smug about their moral superiority to the grasping, bourgeois middle classes of suburbia. But I couldn’t help notice during my year as an inmate at Boulder that everyone had a really beefy lock for their bicycles. Apparently »

Global Warming More Moderate Than Worst-Case Models

Featured image That’s the headline from a press release earlier this week from Duke University’s highly regarded Nicholas School of the Environment. Here’s the lede: DURHAM, N.C. – A new study based on 1,000 years of temperature records suggests global warming is not progressing as fast as it would under the most severe emissions scenarios outlined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). “Based on our analysis, a middle-of-the-road warming scenario »

Gallipoli, 100 Years On

Featured image Today marks the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the Gallipoli campaign—ANZAC Day in Australia and New Zealand, since they provided the bulk of the troops for this ill-fated venture that became known as “Churchill’s Folly.”  Anyone who has seen the early Mel Gibson film, Gallipoli, will know that the operation ended up with the same kind of trench warfare and appalling slaughter that characterized the Western Front.  The British »

The Week in Pictures: Hillarypalooza, The Sequel

Featured image Look, if the old Chevy Chase National Lampoon Vacation films can be rebooted, why can’t we continue to give the boot and reboot to Hillary, who is the gift that keeps on giving (though like the Vacation sequels, less and less satisfying every time)? Maybe her fundraising strategy should be called “Cash for Clunkers”? And finally. . . »

Shakespeare: The Ultimate Dead White Male?

Featured image In my first public lecture at the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2013, perhaps no passage excited a more furious response from some members of the audience than this: It turns out that at a shockingly high number of universities—though not this one—it is possible to take a degree in English without having to take a single course on Shakespeare, which strikes me as absurd as taking a course »