2016 Presidential Election

We’re from the FBI and we’re here to help you, Mr. Trump

Featured image Asha Rangappa, a former FBI agent, argues that the FBI didn’t spy on the Trump campaign (or use an informant, as she delicately puts it) to go after Donald Trump. Rather, it did so to protect him. Rangappa argues that the FBI should have investigated alleged Russian infiltration of the Trump campaign aggressively and directly, given the gravity of this threat. However, she continues, it elected to investigate quietly through »

Jazzing up the FBI spying-on-Trump scandal

Featured image The FBI and its friends in the mainstream media want to make the Bureau’s spying on the Trump campaign seem as dry, innocuous, and non-cloak-and-dagger as possible under the circumstances. An elderly professor contacted three Trump advisers — Carter Page, George Papadopoulos, and Sam Clovis. He met with Page at least several times and maintained an email correspondence with him. He met with Clovis once for coffee. He met several »

The Watergate comparison now looks apt [UPDATED]

Featured image Why was the Watergate break-in more than just the “second rate” burglary Richard Nixon tried to pass it off as? Because it was directed by the president’s team at the Democratic National Committee. Thus, it was an offense against our two party system and our democracy. One political party is not supposed to steal information from the other party, and certainly not in the midst of a presidential campaign. It »

Analyze this

Featured image Mollie Hemingway meticulously documents the outing of the top secret informant on the Trump campaign by the friendly if anonymous sources of the New York Times and Washington Post. The sources decry the danger in which the informant has been placed by the effort of Rep. Nunes to obtain documents related to the source, although they are the ones supplying the identifying information. I think Rep. Nunes is still waiting, »

The Trump Tower meeting cut down to size

Featured image Remember all the excitement after it was revealed that Donald Trump Jr. and a few others in the Trump campaign met with that Russian lawyer at Trump Tower? The mainstream media treated this news as if it were a tipping point in the search for collusion between Team Trump and the Russian government. The notion was always absurd. News flash: A presidential campaign, when offered dirt on the opponent, will »

Axios of weasel

Featured image Mike Allen and Jim VandeHei are two of the three founders of the news site Axios. Allen came out of Politico via the Washington Post; VandeHei had co-founded Politico after work at the Washington Post and the Wall Street Journal. They are heavy hitters in the news business. When they purported to summarize “The public case against Trump” yesterday, I thought attention should be paid. Allen and VandeHei set forth »

An FBI informant in the Trump campaign? (2)

Featured image In her weekly Wall Street Journal column Kim Strassel delivers news and analysis you probably won’t see much of elsewhere. Following up on her own previous work that we noted here yesterday, Kim reports: The Department of Justice lost its latest battle with Congress Thursday when it allowed House Intelligence Committee members to view classified documents about a top-secret intelligence source that was part of the FBI’s investigation of the »

Thoughts from the ammo line

Featured image Ammo Grrrll has been inspired by the Democrats. She announces her HOMECOMING LAWSUIT. She writes: In these dark and terrifying days of a Literal Hitler in the Oval Office (who wears a yarmulke when he visits the Western Wall in Jerusalem, the eternal capital of the Jewish people and soon to be the home of the DJT American Embassy, Hotel, and Casino), one has to take inspiration where one can »

David Begley: The frozen Chozick

Featured image Dave Begley is a Nebraska attorney practicing elder law and estate planning. He is also our occasional presidential campaign correspondent. Drawing on his 2016 coverage, Dave provides this “campaign coda” with a look at the new book by the New York Times reporter on the Clinton campaign. He writes: Two movies on one screen. No cheering from the press box. That’s my take based on reading parts of Amy Chozick’s »

Fear and self-loathing on the campaign trail

Featured image During the 2016 presidential race, we often heard about “dysfunction” within the Trump campaign. Indeed, this was a theme of mainstream media coverage. The Clinton campaign, by contrast, was portrayed as a smooth, if uninspiring, operation. Only after the election did we begin to learn about discord and dysfunction in Hillaryland. Shattered: Inside Hillary Clinton’s Doomed Campaign, by Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes provided details. Along, now, comes Chasing Hillary: »

Sore loser Hillary sees popularity plummet

Featured image They say that no one likes a loser. I don’t think that’s true in sports, where winning teams seem less liked than losing ones. When I coached youth basketball, I was more popular the year my team went 8-8 than the year we were 16-0. In politics, though, the saying generally holds true. One reason is probably that so many people have so much riding on a politician’s success. Unlike »

The Democratic Party Collusion Story Gets Worse

Featured image We have barely begun to plumb the depths of the scandal arising out of the 2016 presidential election. James Comey, John Brennan, Christopher Steele, Fusion GPS, the DNC, the Hillary Clinton campaign, the Perkins Coie law firm, Peter Strzok, Lisa Page, unknown Russians, Andrew McCabe–the list goes on and on, and it keeps getting longer. The latest report comes from Congressional investigators, via Fox News: Newly uncovered text messages between »

Collusion? I’m With Her!

Featured image This cartoon by Michael Ramirez is admirably even-handed, but since there is no evidence of collusion between Russians and the Trump campaign, and we know the Hillary campaign colluded with Russians through Fusion GPS to produce fake opposition research on Trump, the most apt apparel here is the Hillary shirt. Which is so beautiful I’m surprised no one had already thought of it. Click to enlarge: »

Russian bots were a non-factor in 2016

Featured image Michael Moore’s appearance at an anti-Trump rally organized by Russian meddlers illustrates how inconsequential Russian meddling, at least in the form discussed in the recent Mueller indictment, was. Sure, Moore would not have attended this particular rally absent Russian meddling because, absent such meddling, the rally apparently would not have occurred. But did Russia influence Moore’s view of Trump? Of course not. Did Russia influence Moore’s willingness to express his »

Vlad & him

Featured image Yesterday in “Facebook footnotes” I posted the Facebook ad promoting the protest produced by the friends of Vladimir Putin against President Trump outside Trump Tower in the immediate aftermath of the election. The creative efforts of the Russians toiling away in the troll factory did not go for naught. They attracted Michael Moore to the event. The Daily Caller takes a look back at the action via the tweet below »

New York Times: Russian meddling was drop in an ocean

Featured image Yesterday, I wrote that Russia’s efforts during the 2016 election season to sow discord in the electorate and to libel certain candidates were surely inconsequential, given the amount of garbage with which Americans themselves contaminate our politics. Suggesting that Russia’s efforts affected the outcome or even, appreciably, the tenor of this election “is like saying that dropping a bucket of water into the sea affected the tide,” I concluded. This »

Facebook footnotes

Featured image It’s hard to pick up in the clatter of the Democrats’ media adjunct, but Facebook vice president of advertising Rob Goldman has taken to Twitter to make a point or two congenial to President Trump. Indeed, he sounds a little like President Trump in the Tweets below. He makes the point that Russian spending on Facebook ads after the election exceeded spending before the election. I didn’t know that. Why »