Annals of Government Medicine

Annals of Government Medicine

Featured image Obamacare is a Trojan horse, intended, as Barack Obama has said, to lead to the extinction of private health insurance and its replacement by socialized (“single payer”) medicine. So it is pertinent to observe how socialized medicine has worked out in countries where it has been in place for some decades, like the United Kingdom. One key feature of socialized medicine, wherever it exists, is the establishment of death panels. »

Annals of Government Medicine

Featured image The Supreme Court is hearing arguments on Obamacare today, which makes the timing ideal to consider this news story from the cradle of socialized medicine, the United Kingdom. The article is titled “Elderly dying due to ‘despicable age discrimination in NHS.'” Thousands of elderly people are dying unnecessarily early because “despicable” age discrimination in the NHS is denying them treatment for cancer, a charity has warned. A lack of treatment »

Annals of Government Medicine

Featured image Nature dictates that young people incur little in the way of medical expense, on the average, while old people incur a great deal. Thus every government scheme that strives to supplant the obvious, fair alternative–everyone pays for his own medical care, with the aid of whatever insurance he may have purchased–attempts to do two things: 1) force young people to contribute far beyond their own medical costs, and 2) limit »

Remy to the Rescue

Featured image Just in the nick of time, our pal Remi Munasifi and his pals at ReasonTV offer up a Remy-style take on the Fluke business.  Less than two minutes long. »

How About A State of Liberalism Address?

Featured image When Bill Clinton used his 1996 State of the Union address to kick off his ultimately successful re-election campaign, he uttered one of the few SOTU lines that people still remember: “The era of big government is over.”  It did not matter narrowly that this was another Clinton lie; he went on in that speech to outline something like 97 small ways government could get bigger, from school uniforms to »

This, That, and the Other Thing

Featured image So this is a catch-up post, updating and extending some previous stories here, and with a few new short items worthy of note. When I wrote my Commentary magazine cover story in October on how liberals were abusing the legacy of Ronald Reagan (especially the gross distortion that “Reagan raised taxes” as a predicate for Obama’s design to raise income taxes today), a friend remarked to me that I’d be »

Annals of Government Medicine

Featured image Britain’s National Health Service has taken a lot of heat because patients often wait a year or more for operations, and many die in the meantime. The NHS could have responded to this criticism by making its operations more efficient so that waiting times could be reduced, like a private company would, for fear of losing business to competitors. But in government medicine, such incentives are lacking. So the NHS »

Annals of Government Medicine

Featured image A National Health Service hospital, Alexandra Hospital of Redditch, West Midlands, is being sued in a class action for malpractice. The incidents detailed include leaving patients to starve to death. On the whole, the allegations sound as though you put the postal service in charge of health care. Not a bad analogy, come to think of it: The cases against Alexandra Hospital include: * A 35-year-old father-of-four who his family »

Annals of Government Medicine

Featured image Under the U.K.’s National Health Service, death panels put patients who are believed to be terminally ill on a “death pathway.” Of course, it is sometimes inconvenient to mention the fact to the patient’s relatives: NHS doctors are failing to inform up to half of families that their loved ones have been put on a scheme to help end their lives, the Royal College of Physicians has found. Tens of »

Annals of Government Medicine

Featured image A new edict has been handed down in England’s National Health Service: hospitals must no longer deliberately postpone surgery in hopes that the patient will either die or pay to have the operation performed privately: NHS managers have been banned from rationing treatments while patients wait to die or go private after Andrew Lansley, the Health Secretary, admitted that some hospitals were delaying operations. It comes after a damning report »

Annals of Government Medicine

Featured image We noted here that under socialized medicine in the U.K., the death panel process has been delegated to hospital staff who enter “do not resuscitate” orders on patients’ charts without the knowledge of the patient or his or her relatives. Now, another horror story about “The National Hell Service:” A Mum died gasping for breath in hospital after she was WRONGLY given a “do not resuscitate” tag. The frantic husband »

Annals of Government Medicine

Featured image An investigation reveals that under socialized medicine in the U.K., the death panel process has been delegated to hospital staff who designate patients “do not resuscitate” without the knowledge of the patient or his family and occasionally through clerical error: Elderly patients are being condemned to an early death by hospitals making secret use of “do not resuscitate” orders, an investigation has found. The orders – which record an advance »

Annals of Government Medicine

Featured image One of the problems with socialized medicine is that it pretty much destroys–or entirely destroys, depending on a given country’s laws–the private provision of medical services. Thus, when the socialized system begins to crash and burn, as it inevitably will, citizens have nowhere else to turn. That is what is happening in Great Britain: the government has begun a more severe regimen of rationing of surgeries: Hip replacements, cataract surgery »

Annals of government medicine

Today’s installment of our long-running series comes courtesy of London’s Telegraph: “Cancer sufferers refused life-extending drugs despite Government pledge.” The Telegraph reports: An investigation by The Sunday Telegraph has uncovered more than 80 cases in which desperately sick NHS patients have been refused the cancer drugs their doctor sought, in the four months since a £200 million fund was introduced to stop health authorities rationing treatments. The fund was a »