Books

American Sniper on trial

Featured image Former WWF wrestler and Minnesota Governor Jesse Ventura brought a lawsuit for defamation against Chris Kyle, the Navy SEAL sharpshooter and coauthor of American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History. The book was published on January 3, 2012, under the William Morrow imprint of HarperCollins. With a little help from Morrow’s publicity department, Kyle was featured on segments of the Today Show and the »

A book for all seasons

Featured image Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century is the book of the season. Published by Harvard University Press, it is a surprise best-seller. At the time of its publication earlier this year it neatly fit Obama’s theme of the moment on income inequality. Readers seem to have abandoned the book at page 26, as Obama seems to have abandoned the theme of income inequality. As the title of his book »

Is Administrative Law Unlawful? reviewed

Featured image When I set out writing about Philip Hamburger’s Is Administrative Law Unlawful?, I did so for two reasons. First, it’s the most important book I have read in a long time. Second, it’s a forbidding work of legal history that makes few concessions to the general reader. It isn’t easy reading and I thought it was at risk of being widely ignored. I do think the book was at risk »

Is Administrative Law Unlawful? Q and A with with Philip Hamburger

Featured image Philip Hamburger is the Maurice and Hilda Friedman Professor of Law at Columbia Law School and the author, most recently, of Is Administrative Law Unlawful? Professor Hamburger argues that administrative law is unlawful, unconstitutional and illegitimate. Drawing on English legal history, he contends that the regime of agency government resurrects the prerogative power once claimed by English kings and places it in the executive branch of the United States government. »

Is Administrative Law Unlawful? (2): July 4 edition

Featured image In advance of the holiday weekend and late in the afternoon yesterday, the Obama administration released 1,300 pages of new Obamacare regulations, adding to the more than 10,000 pages previously promulgated. This is the way we live now under the regime of the administrative state, subject to regulations dwarfing the laws duly enacted by Congress. Continuing our series of excerpts from Columbia Law School Professor Philip Hamburger’s important new book »

The improbable lives of Louis Zamperini

Featured image I am saddened to learn of the death yesterday of the remarkable Louis Zamperini. What a man; what a great American. The New York Times obituary by Ira Berkow is here. I wrote about Mr. Zamperini on Power Line after I finished reading Laura Hillenbrand’s best-selling biography of him (linked below). The following comments are adapted from what I wrote then. In November 2010 the Wall Street Journal’s Saturday Review »

Is Administrative Law Unlawful? (1)

Featured image Philip Hamburger is the Maurice and Hilda Friedman Professor of Law at Columbia Law School. He is a distinguished scholar of legal history and the author, most recently, of Is Administrative Law Unlawful? Professor Hamburger gave us his take on the book here. My take is that it is the most important book I have read in a long time. Professor Hamburger argues that administrative law is unlawful, unconstitutional and »

Is administrative law unlawful? A word from the author

Featured image Philip Hamburger is the Maurice and Hilda Friedman Professor of Law at Columbia Law School. He is a distinguished scholar of legal history and the author, most recently, of Is Administrative Law Unlawful? It is the most important book I have read in a long time. I think this will be the first post in a series that will feature the book. Here I have invited Professor Hamburger to preview »

Camp of the Saints, 2014 style

Featured image Given the crush of news, NRO is overloaded with good stuff today. At NRO our friend Mac Owens has followed up on my “Camp of the Saints revisited” with what NRO calls “Camp of the Saints, 2014 style?” Mac’s column is already far down the NRO home page and hard to find unless you go looking for it. I want to draw it to your attention. As Mac explores the »

The NAS invites you

Featured image Our friends at the National Association of Scholars write to alert us that this is the last day of NAS’s write-your-own-trigger-warnings contest. Readers of the Washington Post, Inside Higher Ed, the Daily Caller, and College Insurrection have been submitting entries. The NAS would love to have Power Line readers get in on the fun. You are cordially invited: What do you wish you knew about a book before you were »

CRB: Mucking around

Featured image We welcome the publication of the Spring issue of the Claremont Review of Books (subscribe here) this week. In keeping with custom our friends at the Claremont Institute have allowed us to preview three pieces I chose for our readers. We began on Monday with CRB senior editor William Voegeli’s essay “The Redskins and Their Offense.” Yesterday we highlighted “Whistleblowers and traitors,” Hudson Institute senior fellow Gabriel Schoenfeld’s review of »

CRB: Whistleblowers and traitors

Featured image The recent disclosure of government secrets by Edward Snowden and Bradley Manning has brought to the fore difficult questions of accountability and effectiveness in the executive branch. The problem is easy enough to state: national security requires that certain information be kept from our enemies, but who is to decide which information is properly kept secret, and which in the public’s interest to have disclosed? Those who are required to »

A Not So Happy Birthday

Featured image Yesterday Google disdained offering a special banner for Memorial Day.  Today they compound this insult with a banner marking the birthday of Rachel Carson, author of the deeply wrong Silent Spring.  Few books since Das Kapital have done more damage to humans—especially poor children in Africa—than Silent Spring, and yet she—and her dreadful book—continues to be honored by the Left.  (We gave Carson a posthumous Green Weenie Award back in »

Book Notes

Featured image Two of Power Line’s best friends and favorite authors have brand new books out, and both were reviewed in the Wall Street Journal in recent days.  First, Robert Bryce of the Manhattan Institute is out with Smaller Faster Lighter Denser Cheaper, which we previewed in the video below last summer.  Along with Mark Mills and Peter Grossman, Robert is my rabbi on all things energy.  Another pal of ours, Arthur »

More Picking on Piketty

Featured image As John notes below, Thomas Piketty’s empirical work appears to be unraveling, and if not in fact fraudulently manipulated, it is at least highly contestable.  The Spectator’s Fraser Nelson wonders, where was Harvard University Press?  The answer is disconcerting: the book is simply making Harvard University Press too much money for them to care about accuracy.  Maybe Piketty should just re-render his findings in the shape of a hockey stick »

Was Greenwald justified?

Featured image The case of Edward Snowden is important in more ways than one. He has massively violated the espionage laws of the United States and done great damage to our national security. Glenn Greenwald has been one of Snowden’s most prominent journalistic conduits and in my view shares Snowden’s culpability for the violation of the espionage laws. I made this case in principle when James Risen and the New York Times »

Gabriel Kolko, RIP

Featured image About 10 days back I flagged for a pick Ron Radosh’s obituary of Martin Sklar, a Marxist-inspired historian whose works on the rise of the regulatory state in the late 19th century were ironically popular with conservatives and libertarians.  Funny thing about some Marxists; they often stumbled across the truth, but, to borrow Churchill’s line about Stanley Baldwin, dusted themselves off and carried on as though nothing had happened.  Actually »