Books

Who Reads Power Line?

Featured image John Tamny, that’s who.  (See the 15-second video below.)  John is a fellow at the Cato Institute, the editor of RealClearMarkets, frequently contributor to Fox Business, and a columnist for Forbes.  He’s also the author of a book coming out next month, Popular Economics: What the Rolling Stones, Downton Abbey, and LeBron James Can Teach You About Economics.  I’m enjoying the galleys right now, and although it doesn’t come out »

Another Shot of Oakeshott

Featured image Following up on my first installment a few days ago from Michael Oakeshott’s classic essay “On Being Conservative,” herewith my second-favorite passage from the essay, which I find can be effective in getting students to understand why Aristotle (among others) thinks the young are unsuited to the study—let alone practice—of politics: Everybody’s young days are a dream, a delightful insanity, a sweet solipsism. Nothing in them has a fixed shape, »

Classics Revisited: A Shot of Oakeshott

Featured image I think it was nearly three years ago that I wrote a series that ought to have been called “Hayek Tuesday” (because I wrote most of these entries on Tuesday mornings following a Monday night class at the Ashbrook Center that semester based mostly on Hayek’s Constitution of Liberty), with excerpts and observations drawn from that great political thinker and Nobel Prize winner. Subsequently there have been brief serials here »

Voegeli On Liberal B—S—

Featured image In the latest installment of Bill Voegeli’s series the Claremont Institute’s “American Mind” series, Bill discusses his chapter of The Pity Party entitled “Liberal Bullshit.”  It’s worth viewing if for no other reason than to enjoy how fully Charles Kesler channels William F. Buckley’s old mannerisms from “Firing Line.” »

Sir Martin Gilbert, RIP

Featured image Sad news from London this morning of the passing of Sir Martin Gilbert, the official biographer of Winston Churchill, and the author of something like 40 other books—many of them big, big books, some of them about Jewish history and the Holocaust. He began his career as a research assistant to Randolph Churchill, and after Randolph died succeeded him as the official biographer, going on to write six of the »

Picking on Piketty, Part 5

Featured image We’ve noted the weaknesses of Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the 21st Century before (here, here, here, and here), but what the heck, with France ruining Piketty’s and Krugman’s Monday by cutting its high income surtax, we might as well note the latest torpedo aimed at Piketty. It comes from the website Capx (“for popular capitalism”), in a post entitled “Ten Truths About Income Inequality.” All ten are worth taking in, »

A Pity to Have a Party without The Pity Party

Featured image We featured Bill Voegeli, author of The Pity Party: A Mean-Spirited Diatribe Against Liberal Compassion, on our second Power Line podcast a few weeks ago, but Charles Kesler and The American Mind have posted an interview with Bill that is worth taking in, right here (this segment about 12 minutes long): »

There’s something about Louie: Billy Graham and after

Featured image Gary Schneeberger of Grace Hill Media (a marketing firm established to reach “religious America”) has sent us the message and accompanying video below. Although it is a form message, it follows up where I left off in “There’s something about Louie.” Here is the message: By now you may have heard that UNBROKEN, the inspirational true-life story of war hero Louis Zamperini, blew away all industry estimates at the box »

There’s something about Louie

Featured image We went to see the film Unbroken on Christmas day at a suburban St. Paul multiplex. We arrived punctually for the first afternoon showing only to find that it had long since sold out, as had each subsequent showing until 10:30 p.m. They had a few tickets left for that one, but we bought two tickets for a mid-afternoon showing yesterday. It also sold out. Indeed, although we arrived 40 »

Stonewalled at the Times

Featured image Mary Mapes is the award-winning CBS News producer responsible for the 60 Minutes story subsumed under the rubric of Rathergate. The story disgraced CBS in the 2004 presidential campaign and CBS commissioned an investigation to determine what had happened. The investigation was undertaken by former Attorney General Richard Thornburgh and former AP president/ceo Louis Boccardi together with a team working under their direction. When they released their report the following »

Edmund Burke, Barack Obama, and cop-killing

Featured image To Scott’s lists of recommended books for the Christmas season, I would like to add Yuval Levin’s The Great Debate: Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine, and the Birth of Right and Left. Levin, probably my favorite current analyst of politics and policy, describes the philosophical clash between Burke and Paine and explains how it forms the root of the current political divide in America. Levin’s discussion of Burke also has relevance, »

Edward Jay Epstein: Journalism and truth

Featured image Michael Wolff has declared Edward Jay Epstein “one of the great investigative journalists of the era.” Who is his peer? I say he is our most formidable investigative journalist. He is the author of numerous riveting books, among which are three on the Kennedy assassination: Inquest: The Warren Commission and the Establishment of Truth, Counterplot: Garrison vs. Oswald, Ferrie, Shaw, Warren Commission, FBI CIA, the Media, the Establishment and Legend: »

The gift of books, Gulag edition

Featured image Thinking about President Obama’s announcement of our new policy toward Cuba, I would like to take the liberty of adding a few books to my holiday list for Power Line readers. Armando Valladares, Against All Hope: A Memoir of Life in Castro’s Gulag. A great, inspirational memoir: the passion of Armando Valladares, kept in print by our friends at Encounter Books. Alexander Dolgun, Alexander Dolgun’s Story: An American in the »

The gift of books

Featured image In a recent column Thomas Sowell urged his readers to “Give the gift of books!” I second that emotion (as well as the books to which he draws attention). I think the following five books are among the most important books for conservative readers published this year. I can say this with absolute certainty: they are the most important new books for conservatives that I read this year: Philip Hamburger, »

Time to Revitalize Congress?

Featured image Scott kindly noted a couple days ago my appearance earlier this month at Yale’s William F. Buckley Program on the topic of James Burnham. While Burnham’s classic Suicide of the West was the main focus of the conference, in rereading the Burnham corpus before the conference I was struck by one of his neglected books, Congress and the American Tradition (1959). Even in 1959 Burnham could see the capacities of »

The protracted conflict

Featured image Earlier this month The William F. Buckley, Jr. Program at Yale held a conference in honor of the fiftieth anniversary of James Burnham’s Suicide of the West, republished in a new edition by Encounter Books. The festivities included introductory remarks by Donald Kagan followed by three panels and a keynote speech by former NSA/CIA director Michael Hayden. The Buckley Program conference videos are all accessible on YouTube here. The Buckley »

CRB: Appointed tyrants

Featured image We conclude our preview of the forthcoming issue of the Claremont Review of Books (subscribe here) with Professor Michael Uhlmann’s review of Is Administrative Law Unlawful? by Philip Hamburger. If I were to name three books of the year for conservatives, one of them would surely be Hamburger’s. Yet Hamuburger’s is a challenging and difficult book, combining English legal history with a critique of the contemporary administrative state. It is »