Books

Edward Jay Epstein: Journalism and truth

Featured image Michael Wolff has declared Edward Jay Epstein “one of the great investigative journalists of the era.” Who is his peer? I say he is our most formidable investigative journalist. He is the author of numerous riveting books, among which are three on the Kennedy assassination: Inquest: The Warren Commission and the Establishment of Truth, Counterplot: Garrison vs. Oswald, Ferrie, Shaw, Warren Commission, FBI CIA, the Media, the Establishment and Legend: »

The gift of books, Gulag edition

Featured image Thinking about President Obama’s announcement of our new policy toward Cuba, I would like to take the liberty of adding a few books to my holiday list for Power Line readers. Armando Valladares, Against All Hope: A Memoir of Life in Castro’s Gulag. A great, inspirational memoir: the passion of Armando Valladares, kept in print by our friends at Encounter Books. Alexander Dolgun, Alexander Dolgun’s Story: An American in the »

The gift of books

Featured image In a recent column Thomas Sowell urged his readers to “Give the gift of books!” I second that emotion (as well as the books to which he draws attention). I think the following five books are among the most important books for conservative readers published this year. I can say this with absolute certainty: they are the most important new books for conservatives that I read this year: Philip Hamburger, »

Time to Revitalize Congress?

Featured image Scott kindly noted a couple days ago my appearance earlier this month at Yale’s William F. Buckley Program on the topic of James Burnham. While Burnham’s classic Suicide of the West was the main focus of the conference, in rereading the Burnham corpus before the conference I was struck by one of his neglected books, Congress and the American Tradition (1959). Even in 1959 Burnham could see the capacities of »

The protracted conflict

Featured image Earlier this month The William F. Buckley, Jr. Program at Yale held a conference in honor of the fiftieth anniversary of James Burnham’s Suicide of the West, republished in a new edition by Encounter Books. The festivities included introductory remarks by Donald Kagan followed by three panels and a keynote speech by former NSA/CIA director Michael Hayden. The Buckley Program conference videos are all accessible on YouTube here. The Buckley »

CRB: Appointed tyrants

Featured image We conclude our preview of the forthcoming issue of the Claremont Review of Books (subscribe here) with Professor Michael Uhlmann’s review of Is Administrative Law Unlawful? by Philip Hamburger. If I were to name three books of the year for conservatives, one of them would surely be Hamburger’s. Yet Hamuburger’s is a challenging and difficult book, combining English legal history with a critique of the contemporary administrative state. It is »

CRB: I feel your pain

Featured image If I were to name three books of the year for conservatives, one of them would surely be The Pity Party: A Mean-Spirited Diatribe Against Liberal Compassion, by William Voegeli. I contributed a blurb with my assessment of the book that I posted in “(What’s So Funny ‘Bout) Peace, Love and Compassion?” I posted Bill’s account of the book in “A word from the author.” Bill’s previous book was Never »

CRB: Bridge to nowhere

Featured image Our friends at the Claremont Review of Books (subscribe here for $19.95 and get immediate online access thrown in for free) have given us a look at an advance copy of the Fall 2014 issue, scheduled for release later this week. I read my favorite magazines — National Review, the Weekly Standard, Commentary and the New Criterion — front to back, because (next to the books themselves) I most enjoy »

Ishmael Jones: Panetta’s betrayal

Featured image Ishmael Jones is a former CIA case officer. He is the author of The Human Factor: Inside the CIA’s Dysfunctional Intelligence Culture, the book that serves as the point of reference in the column below. Mr. Jones advises us that this column has been approved for publication by the CIA’s Publications Review Board. He writes: In 2008 I wrote a book that criticized CIA bureaucracy. The book contains no secrets »

The Pity Party: A word from the author

Featured image William Voegeli is a senior editor of the Claremont Review of Books, and the author, most recently, of The Pity Party: A Mean-Spirited Diatribe Against Liberal Compassion. I read a galley copy of the book this summer and believe it to be an important book. Bill is a natural teacher and he entertains while he instructs. The book was published on Tuesday. I asked Bill to preview it for our »

(What’s so funny ’bout) peace, love and compassion?

Featured image Today is the official publication date of Bill Voegeli’s new book: The Pity Party: A Mean-Spirited Diatribe Against Liberal Compassion. We’ll hear from the author himself about the book tomorrow. Inviting me to submit a blurb, the publisher sent me a galley copy of the book this summer. I read it and seriously loved it. This is the complete unexpurgated blurb I submitted: In this brilliant book William Voegeli demonstrates »

James Burnham on Obama

Featured image I’m deep into rereading the works of the great James Burnham in preparation for the fourth annual conference on November 14 of the very fine William F. Buckley Program at Yale University, which will be devoted chiefly to Burnham’s classic Suicide of the West. (Come if you can: details here). And in the last chapter of Suicide of the West, Burnham explains in just two sentences exactly why Obama’s foreign »

A conversation with Christopher DeMuth

Featured image In the newly posted installment of Conversations with Bill Kristol, we meet up with the formidable public intellectual Christopher DeMuth (complete video below, broken into six chapters here, transcript here). As president of the American Enterprise Institute from 1986 to 2008, DeMuth built AEI into a powerhouse. He currently serves as a distinguished fellow at the Hudson Institute. In this conversation, Kristol and DeMuth discuss political thinkers including Edward C. »

CBS declines to answer

Featured image Sharyl Attkisson has been working on her memoir recounting her ordeal at CBS News roughly since she left the network earlier this year. The fact that her she had a book coming out and the contours of her critique of CBS News are no surprise. She has publicly discussed them for months. The book is scheduled for publication on November 4, but the New York Post has obtained a copy »

Mucking around revisited

Featured image Pulitzer-Prize winning historian Doris Kearns Goodwin’s The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism has just been published in paperback. Our friend Jean Yarbrough took a devastating look at what Goodwin has on offer this time around in the pages of the Claremont Review of Books. In light of next week’s elections, Professor Yarbrough’s account of the book – of the incestuous relationship between »

The Attkisson angle

Featured image Sharyl Attkisson’s new book about her career as an investigative reporter at CBS News in the Age of Obama — Stonewalled: My Fight for Truth Against the Forces of Obstruction, Intimidation, and Harassment in Obama’s Washington — won’t be published officially until November 4. Kyle Smith provides a preview here in the New York Post. Here is Smith’s account of the Attkisson angle intersecting with the Ingraham angle: Attkisson, who »

Scruton to the Rescue

Featured image Roger Scruton has a new book out How To Be a Conservative.  Does Roger publish a book every week?  It sure seems like it sometimes; I’m still working my way through The Soul of the World. Anyway, if you’re running behind on your reading pile, as I always am, you should avail yourself of Richard Reinsch’s interview/podcast with Roger about his new book at the Liberty Fund’s indispensable LibertyLawSite.  (In »