China

That certain something

Featured image Seen on the Twitter feed of (New York Times reporter) Chris Buckley, retweeted by (New York Times reporter) Peter Baker. I’m taking the liberty of passing it on without further comment. Mao's grandson has that certain something: http://t.co/i6Mun969oc pic.twitter.com/jbDBzaduvb — Chris Buckley 储百亮 (@ChuBailiang) March 10, 2014 »

Dear China: Please Don’t Embarrass Me

Featured image Beating up on the inanities of Tom Friedman is about as hard as falling out a first floor window, and there’s an entire catalogue of Power Line entries to prove it.  (Here’s his Green Weenie, for example.)  But like taking out the recycling, somebody’s got to do it. Today Friedman departs slightly from his favorite “China-Is-Awesome” theme to write critically of China for a change.  And what, pray tell, has »

Will China Save the Middle East? (With comment by Paul)

Featured image Through the post-war era, and especially after the fall of the Soviet Union, the United States has been the guarantor of something approximating peace in the Middle East. The U.S. accepted that role largely because of its need for Middle Eastern oil imports. But times have changed: domestic energy development, especially fracking technology, unleashed on private lands beyond the reach of the Democratic Party’s Luddites, is rapidly turning the United »

China Joins the Climate Skeptics?

Featured image Let’s review the climate diplomacy story so far.  The elephant in the room at the UN negotiations has always been China, India, and other developing nations who have steadfastly refused to agree to future limits on their use of affordable hydrocarbon energy, which they rightly see as the path to becoming fully middle class nations as we and Europe did.  The Chinese told Al Gore in Kyoto in 1997 when »

China: Don’t Look Now But. . . (Update)

Featured image You may recall that back in the late 1980s, lots of certified smart people like James Fallows and Clyde Prestowitz were telling us that Japan was eating our lunch in terms of economic policy, because they had embraced the kind of government-led industrial policy that used to put a spring in Walter Mondale’s step.  It was confidently predicted that at the present rate, Japan might well overtake the United States »

A Mystery Is Solved

Featured image The New York Times announced today that its systems have been hacked by the Chinese over a period of months: For the last four months, Chinese hackers have persistently attacked The New York Times, infiltrating its computer systems… Here comes the key bit: and getting passwords for its reporters and other employees. So that explains Tom Friedman’s columns! We probably should apologize for believing Friedman was dumb enough to consider »

Communist Chinese Slated to Buy Taiwan’s Free Press

Featured image If you can’t beat ‘em, buy ‘em. That may be the philosophy behind the proposed takeover of much of Taiwan’s free press by a mainland Chinese company that is conspicuous for its loyalty to the Communist Party: Americans everywhere should at least be aware of the disaster that’s about to happen to democratic Taiwan’s media market. Taiwan’s most popular and independent media organization, Next Media, is about to be sold »

Let’s not hand the Chinese our advanced battery technology

Featured image More than a decade’s worth of advanced American technology is about to be handed to the Chinese at a creditors’ sale. Democrat Ike Skelton, chairman of the U.S. House Armed Services Committee from 2007 to 2010 and Republican Duncan Hunter, chairman of the same Committee from 2002 to 2006, urge the government to move quickly to prevent this hand-over. The technology in question consists of advanced lithium-iron phosphate batteries. According »

Immelt’s Great Face Plant Forward

Featured image New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman has a recurring daydream. In Friedman’s daydream the United States adopts the highly efficient Chinese Communist mode of government under the leadership of “a reasonably enlightened group of people” — such as Friedman finds the Chinese Communists to be. Friedman finds enlightenment among the Chinese Communists in their collective pursuit of “electric cars, solar power, energy efficiency, batteries, nuclear power and wind power.” GE »

From Walter Judd to Tom Freidman

Featured image I loved John’s demonstration of Tom Friedman’s ignorance of Minnesota politics which I consider one of the best Power Line posts in recent memory. John’s takedown of Friedman included, among other gems, this: Friedman’s suggestion that in the 1950s and 1960s Minnesota Republicans were all liberals is absurd. Minnesota Congressmen of the era included rock-ribbed conservative Al Quie, John Zwach, who headed the Conservative Caucus as a member of the »

China: Don’t Look Now, But. . . (Updated)

Featured image It’s been a while since we last updated the “China: Don’t Look Now, But. . .” series (you can find the previous three installments here, here, and here), but a terrific op-ed in today’s Wall Street Journal by Joseph Sternberg suggests that China has finally succumbed to the “greater fool” theory, as evidenced by its recent decision to buy A123 Systems, the ailing, Obama-backed (which means taxpayer-backed) car battery company »

Harry Reid promotes crony capitalism, with Chinese cronies

Featured image The Washington Free Beacon reports that Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid has been working to secure sweetheart deals for Chinese green energy firms. Specifically, Reid reportedly has been pulling strings behind the scenes on behalf of ENN Mojave Energy, a Nevada subsidiary of the Chinese-owned ENN Group. After more than two years of secret negotiations beginning in 2009, lawmakers in Clark County, Nevada agreed to sell 9,000 acres of public »

China: Don’t Look Now, But . . .

Featured image An old saying goes that when the U.S. economy sneezes, the world’s economy catches a cold.  This is plainly less true in an age of globalization, and these days Europe’s economic Parkinson’s Disease seems to be having some kind of collateral effect on prospects here, which is one reason why President Obama would really like it if Angela Merkel would relent on monetary rectitude. Meanwhile, China may or may not »

China: Don’t Look Now, But . . .

Featured image For most of the last three decades, China has presented a challenge to a favorite axiom of classical liberals—namely, that economic freedom begets political freedom in the fullness of time. China appears to be a huge exception to this idea (which was popular with, among others, Milton Friedman).  How long would China be able to go on with economic liberalization without political and social liberalization?  Or had they in fact developed »

China: Don’t Look Now, But . . .

Featured image While everyone has their gaze fixed firmly on Europe, with a Spanish bank crisis reaching a climax perhaps today, I wonder if we aren’t neglecting the risk from an economic crisis in China.  What would happen if China’s economy hits the wall the way Japan’s did at the end of the 1980s?  Barron’s gloomy Gus “Up and Down Wall Street” columnist Alan Abelson wonders the same thing this morning after »

Panetta attempts to clean up after Obama in India

Featured image During a two-day stay in India, Secretary of Defense Panetta urged India to: (1) take a larger role in Afghanistan and (2) support the Obama administration’s new policy that purports to counterbalance China’s growing influence and military power. This shouldn’t have been a hard sell. India has an interest in as much stability as can be achieved in Afghanistan because instability there might well benefit Pakistan. And India has an »

Dissident Chen leaves U.S. Embassy; China promises to be nice to him — Part Two

Featured image The story of Ghuangchek Chen, the blind activist who took refuge in the U.S. embassy, seems to have taken another turn. This morning, the story, as reported by the MSM, was that Chen had left the Embassy after he and the U.S. received assurances that, as I put, China would be nice to Chen. Specifically, Chen would relocate to another part of China, enter law school, and be treated like »