Education

Jury Rejects Conservative Law Professor’s Discrimination Claim

Featured image We have written several times–here, here and here–about the case of Teresa Wagner (now Teresa Manning), an “out” conservative law professor who sued the University of Iowa law school for discrimination based on her political beliefs. The facts of the case seemed powerful: The underlying facts of the case are outrageous. They are what made the case important and newsworthy. Professor Wagner sought a full-time legal writing position at the »

The case of Hillsdale College

Featured image The Wall Street Journal’s Kyle Peterson profiles our long-time friend and Hillsdale College President Larry Arnn in “Liberal arts for conservative minds” (accessible here via Google). The occasion of the profile is Larry’s receipt of one of this year’s Bradley Prize awards. Larry is the past president of the Claremont Institute. Here the profile takes a sidelong glance at the work of the institute: The institute’s first program, the Publius »

Committee takes on grade inflation at Dartmouth

Featured image I wrote here about the problem of rampant grade inflation at Dartmouth. Last month, the College’s ad hoc committee on grading practices and grade inflation documented the extent of the problem and issued a proposal for addressing it. The committee’s proposal is thoughtful and worth reading. I want to focus here, though, on the problem of grade inflation. According to the report, the median grade at Dartmouth in academic year »

Scholars protest college board’s leftist spin on American history

Featured image Last summer I wrote about the the College Board’s new AP U.S. History (APUSH) framework and explained how it mandates a left-wing narrative for the teaching of American history to our top high school students. The teaching of American history is ground zero in the left’s battle to indoctrinate students. The new AP U.S. History framework is the left’s ultimate weapon in this battle. Now 55 leading American history scholars »

Economic mobility and government activism

Featured image Michael Gerson wrote today about “the rhetoric of mobility” — in other words, the way liberals and conservatives talk about the issue of economic mobility. He finds the rhetoric of both sides, as the well views behind it, wanting. Gerson’s piece is thoughtful, as usual. But it should be of concern to conservatives who worry that “reform conservatism,” a movement with which Gerson is associated, may to some extent represent »

Liberals block the most promising path in Baltimore

Featured image Many liberals and some conservatives would like to force a major reduction in the prison population, even though current incarceration rates contributed significantly to sharply reduced crime rates. One objection to the crusade to reduce incarceration is high recidivism. Nearly 70 percent of released prisoners are arrested within three years. To deal with this objection, proponents of reform call for rehabilitation and training programs for prisoners. They sometimes talk as »

The Telos of Liberalism: Your Children’s Bedtime Stories

Featured image The largest source of inequality today is the family, so it is not surprising that liberals obsessed with inequality have to control family life eventually, either by nationalizing children (Plato’s idea, only he was kidding), or by extending regulation to family matters. Think this is far-fetched? The Australian Broadcasting Company has found a philosopher named Adam Swift who thinks parents reading to their children helps increase inequality, and therefore we »

Victory Over Communism

Featured image As Paul reported here a couple days ago, Barron’s textbook publishing division produced a monstrous book equating Justice Clarence Thomas with fascists and the KKK.  I too was stunned to see this from the Barron’s stable, as Barron’s weekly is my favorite financial publication, and it employs many ideologically sound writers (Tom Donlan, Gene Epstein, etc), which suggests their management has their head on straight. Yesterday Barron’s announced it will withdraw »

Barron’s AP Test Prep Guide equates Clarence Thomas with Fascists

Featured image I’ve been warning for some time about the College Board’s effective mandate that AP U.S. History be taught from a hard-left perspective. But this report by Eric Owens of the Daily Caller leaves me stunned: The latest version of a top-selling study guide for the Advanced Placement European History exam explains the French Revolution with a chart which identifies Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas as a fascist and pairs him »

Student Sit-Ins: Not What They Used To Be

Featured image Those of us who were college students in the late 1960s and early 1970s recall student occupations of administration buildings with varying degrees of fondness. Foolish as they may have been, student radicals in those days had a good idea what they were fighting for: an end to the Vietnam war (not that our colleges were doing anything to prosecute it) and, more broadly, imposition of a Communist dictatorship. Radicals »

Seattle Muslims demand sacking of teacher who showed Muhammad cartoons

Featured image The day after the Charlie Hebdo shootings, Deepa Bhandaru showed some of the cartoons that prompted the attack to students at the Refugee Women’s Alliance in Seattle. Bhandaru showed the cartoons in the context of a discussion on religious pluralism and freedom of speech. The cartoons she showed to her students, most if not all of whom are Muslims, reportedly were not the more inflammatory, sexual images. Now, a group »

Another Reason to Home School Your Kids

Featured image A faithful reader passes along the snapshot of a high school world history textbook that notes the “fantastic economic results” of Stalin’s management of the Soviet economy back in the glory days of the successive Five Year plans. No wonder people fall for Elizabeth Warren. Here’s the text in case you can’t make out the photo: These forceful means of making the Soviet Union a modern industrial nation took a »

More Money: The Universal Solution

Featured image President Obama’s State of the Union speech tomorrow night will call for large tax increases and–as always–lots more spending. Somehow, liberals consider it a tautology that if there is a problem, spending money on it is a good thing. And if the money we have spent so far hasn’t done the trick, the solution is to spend even more. The possibility that there is little or no correlation between federal »

Law Student Digs the Hole Deeper

Featured image When students at Columbia and other law schools around the country demanded that exams be postponed because they were traumatized by the Michael Brown and Eric Garner cases, we and many others responded with ridicule. In today’s National Law Journal, a third-year law student at Harvard named William Desmond says that we got it all wrong: the request for extra time for exams was a sign of the students’ strength. »

Civil Rights Commissioner Objects to Institutionalized Racism in Minneapolis Public Schools

Featured image We wrote here about the Minneapolis public schools imposing a quota system for suspending students. I wrote: Why does [School Superintendent Bernadeia Johnson] suppose that students, white, black, Asian, Hispanic or whatever, are being suspended? Presumably it is because they were disruptive and were degrading the learning environment for the other students. Does Ms. Johnson seriously believe that teachers and principals are suspending students for no reason? If so, then »

Is There Any Hope For Our Civilization?

Featured image I am an inveterate optimist, but the more I learn about what goes on in our universities, the more I conclude that our civilization has a death wish. Heather Mac Donald’s article in City Journal on “micro-aggression” at UCLA prompted this particular bout of despondency. What goes on in our universities is scarcely believable. Mac Donald’s article is lengthy and should be read in its entirety, but here are a »

Racism Institutionalized in Minneapolis Public Schools

Featured image This probably shouldn’t be surprising, but still… Minneapolis public school officials are making dramatic changes to their discipline practices by requiring the superintendent’s office to review all suspensions of students of color. The change comes amid intensifying scrutiny of the way Minneapolis public schools treat minority students and in the wake of new data showing black students are 10 times more likely to be sent home than white students. Superintendent »