Energy Policy

Cheesy Energy Stories of the Week

Featured image I’m old enough to remember when surplus government cheese was given away to poor people. But now the geniuses of greenery over in the UK have come up with a new use: Gas made from cheese to heat hundreds of homes Hundreds of homes in Cumbria will be heated using cheese from next month, as a new government-backed green energy plant starts producing gas from cheddar manufacturing waste. The anaerobic digestion plant »

Unhinged Leftist of the Week

Featured image Outgoing California Senator Barbara “Call Me Senator” Boxer deserves a Power Line Green Weenie Lifetime Achievement Award for her performance this week in a hearing about energy and climate policy that featured Alex Epstein, author of the cheeky book The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels, and Father Robert Sirico of the Acton Institute. Here’s a five-minute highlight reel of Boxer losing ground to Epstein and Sirico: And as a special »

California’s Ongoing Suicide Watch

Featured image Even Jerry Brown admits that California’s newly mandated $15 an hour minimum wage is economically unsound, but we’re doing it anyway, Because Justice! Or something. But it may not matter much, because California businesses may not have enough . . . electricity. Two headlines from the past week tell the story. First, you may have heard about a massive natural gas leak out near Newhall over the past few months. »

Dept of Energy to Greenies: Sod Off!

Featured image The grasping rent-seekers of subsidies and mandates for wind and solar power have been sniping at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration (EIA) for supposedly overestimating the costs of wind and solar power compared to coal- and gas-fired power, and underestimating the growth of wind and solar. EIA does a terrific job of data gathering and analysis, even if some of their work requires great care, such as »

Another Epic Greenfail

Featured image The number of people in the world who can be said in “energy poverty,” that is, with little or no modern energy available, is around 3 billion. About 1.5 billion people, according to some estimates, have no electricity at all, and most of the three billion rely on extremely low-tech or non-tech sources of energy for basic needs of cooking and warmth, meaning they burn, wood, straw, or dried animal »

Gas to Overtake Coal This Year

Featured image Coal has been the leading source of electric power generation by a huge margin for at least the last 65 years (and probably before, but that’s how far back the Dept. of Energy data series goes). But today the Energy Information Administration announced that it appears natural gas will overtake coal this year as the leading source of electric power generation> Here’s what the DoE chart looks like: Now, the »

Obama to Energy Producers: Drop Dead

Featured image Oh, well, if Hillary kills off what’s left of the coal industry, at least we still have a booming natural gas industry, creating lots of good-paying jobs and with a potential for significant exports to help with our miserable trade balance. Wait, what’s that? U.S. Rejects Multi-Billion Dollar Jordan Cove Gas Export Plan U.S. regulators rejected Veresen Inc.’s multibillion-dollar proposal to build a terminal in Oregon that would export as »

Sympathy for the miner

Featured image During the Clinton hour of the Democrats’ town hall infomercial on CNN last night, Hillary Clinton actually said this: “I’m the only candidate which [sic] has a policy about how bring economic opportunity using clean, renewable energy as the key into coal country. Because we’re gonna put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business” (video below). What is to be said? Madam Hillary, thank you for »

Redistributing daylight

Featured image Daylight saving time is mistakenly credited to Benjamin Franklin, but it may still be a good idea even if it wasn’t inspired by Franklin. Nevertheless, I find the commencement of daylight saving time today annoying. As a morning person, I am not the least bit pleased by the extension of dawn by an hour so early in the year. By the same token, do we really need to move sunset »

Radiophobia on the Rocks?

Featured image Over at Instapundit Ed Driscoll reminds us of the person checking out at a Whole Foods somewhere who was overheard demanding that “I need to read the numbers on the barcode aloud to you. I don’t want any lasers touching my food.” This is your brain on liberalism. Any questions? Just wait till this person finds out that “Instant Noodles Can Make Babies Gay.” Of course, for a politically-correct liberal, is »

More on the Supreme Court vs the EPA

Featured image The Supreme Court’s stay of Obama’s “Clean Power Plan” yesterday is fairly unusual. But it may have come about because the EPA essentially dared the judiciary to stop it. Jonathan Adler has some useful observations up on this point at The Volokh Conspiracy yesterday: Looking back over the various stay applications, I suspect that the EPA’s arguments against the stay were undermined by the Agency’s own statements about the potentially »

Another Friendly Reminder of Peak Nonsense

Featured image I know I posted just yesterday the National Geographic cover (from back around 2006 or so) about the end of cheap oil, but I can’t resist doing so again today because of the headline this morning in the Wall Street Journal, posted right below: Heh. Remember this when the oil cycle moves up again, as it inevitably will at some point (though that point may be longer and slower in »

Breaking: Supreme Court Blocks Obama’s Climate Plan

Featured image This is huge. The Supreme Court, by a 5 – 4 vote, has just issued a stay of Obama’s so-called “Clean Power Plan,” pending a full review of the case by a lower appeals court. ABC News reports: A divided Supreme Court agreed Tuesday to halt enforcement of President Barack Obama’s sweeping plan to address climate change until after legal challenges are resolved. The surprising move is a blow to the administration »

William Tucker, RIP

Featured image Sad news yesterday of the passing of William Tucker, one of the great freelance journalists of our time. I didn’t know Bill especially well, but we spoke on the phone now and then, visited a few times in Washington, and were together just last September at an event at St. Francis College in Brooklyn, speaking about energy and environmentalism. I always learned something useful and original from him every time »

A Friendly Reminder

Featured image Remember: these are the same people who say that we know everything we need to know about climate change and how to fix it, and if you disagree you’re an immoral person and should shut up or be prosecuted and jailed: Matt Ridley wrote in the London Times yesterday (behind a paywall so forget a link): The shale revolution is the dominant reason for the fall. I know columnists are »

Obama to Oil Companies (and Motorists): Drop Dead

Featured image One of the great things about being a leftist is that you never have to be consistent. Fossil fuels are too cheap!, we are constantly told, and their overuse is wrecking the planet. But when oil prices and gasoline pump prices soar, the left complains that the oil industry is gouging us. But when oil prices collapse and the pump price goes down, what does the left want? Higher taxes »

More Tweaks on the Beaks of the Peaks

Featured image Beating up on the Malthusian “peak oil” crowd never gets old, and even though we took up this subject just last week (but also last year, and two years before that), I can’t resist noting that yet another prediction of mine has come true already. Last week I mentioned that some time soon The Economist was likely to reprint their “Drowning in Oil” cover from 1999 (below). Well this didn’t »