EPA Had Warning of Gold King Mine Disaster

Featured image We have written about the EPA’s Gold King Mine environmental disaster here, here and here. The EPA and its contractor negligently spilled three million gallons of toxic liquid contaminated with lead, arsenic, cadmium and aluminum into the Animas River. It is the kind of incident that, if it had been caused by a private company instead of a government agency, likely would have led to criminal charges: In the aftermath »

The EPA Does It Again

Featured image Actually, they did it five months ago. But it has gotten hardly any publicity. Maybe in the wake of the EPA’s Gold King Mine disaster, people will pay attention to what the agency did in Greensboro, Georgia: In Greensboro, EPA-funded contractors grading a toxic 19th-century cotton mill site struck a water main, sending the deadly sediment into a nearby creek. … The sediment flows carry dangerous mercury, lead, arsenic and »

The Gold King Mine Fiasco: What It Tells Us About the EPA

Featured image We have written here and here about the EPA-caused spill of three million gallons of toxic liquid into the Animas River in Colorado. Private companies that have caused environmental disasters of that magnitude (or much less) have been criminally prosecuted; in some cases, individuals have been jailed. Will the EPA face similar accountability? Just kidding. At Watts Up With That?, Paul Driessen has an excellent update on the Gold King »

Alan Carlin’s “Environmentalism Gone Mad”

Featured image Four years ago I reported here on the case of Alan Carlin, the 38-year career employee of the EPA who was being silenced because of his dissenting views on climate change. The EPA suppressed Carlin’s research into the weaknesses of the EPA’s “findings” on climate change science, and ordered Carlin to cease any further work on the subject. For a long time I have pondered the idea of trying to »

EPA Is “Upset” About Three Million Gallon Animas River Spill

Featured image We wrote here and here about the Environmental Protection Agency’s colossal, three million gallon spill of mining waste containing lead, arsenic and other toxic substances into the Animas River in Colorado. EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy says the agency is very sorry: “We want to reassure everyone that the EPA does take full responsibility for the spill,” which took place at the long-closed mine north of Durango, she said. “No agency »

EPA Says: Do As We Say, Not As We Do

Featured image Steve wrote here about the Environmental Protection Agency’s accidental release of mining waste containing arsenic and lead into the Animas River in Colorado. The spill is a disaster of the first magnitude, as the river has been turned a bright, toxic orange: The EPA is sorry about the spill. Administrator Gina McCarthy says the spill is “really a tragic and very unfortunate incident.” She added that the EPA is “taking »

Condom Update

Featured image During my time last year in Boulder, I happened upon the “Condom Squad” one day out on Pearl Street, consisting of fetching young ladies distributing unlimited quantities of premium latex goods (see photo, left). I’m not sure exactly what message was intended in the age of campus “rape culture,” and in any event as my criminal defense lawyer was on vacation that week I decided against asking if they provided »

Is The Administration’s Position on Global Warming Scientific?

Featured image Across a broad range of issues, liberals ignore the relevant science. Perhaps global warming is foremost on this list. For an elegant, brief statement of why this is true, let’s turn to climate scientist Judith Curry. This is an excerpt from her observations on Obama’s “Clean Power Plan.” Do you think Obama’s messaging about climate change is true to the science? Well, the one thing you don’t hear President Obama »

Global Warming: A $1.5 Trillion Industry

Featured image The Climate Change Business Journal has calculated that global warming is now a $1.5 trillion a year industry. The Business Journal’s report is not available for free online, but its findings are reviewed by the Insurance Journal. They are eye-opening, to say the least: The $1.5 trillion global “climate change industry” grew at between 17 and 24 percent annually from 2005-2008, slowing to between 4 and 6 percent following the »

Negligent Corporate Polluter Nabbed in Massive Spill. . . Oh, Wait

Featured image There’s been a massive spill of toxic mine tailings into the Animas River in Colorado, “turning the water an opaque orange color reminiscent of boxed mac and cheese,” reports Newsweek. The EPA estimates over 1 million gallons of mining waste was dumped into the river. (See photo below.)  More from Newsweek: The wastewater released contains heavy metals including lead, arsenic, cadmium, and aluminum, Ostrander said. The EPA is preparing a plan »

Climatistas Forced to Abandon Their Own BS

Featured image In my Weekly Standard article out today on the EPA’s so-called “Clean Power Plan,” I note one of the more curious and significant changes from the original draft rule of a year ago and the final rule released on Monday of this week: namely that the fourth “building block” for state compliance—energy conservation/efficiency measures—was dropped from the rule. Here’s the key part of the argument as summarized in the article: »

More Renewable Energy = More Expensive Energy

Featured image This post can be viewed as a companion to Steve’s post immediately below. “Greens” are hailing the Obama administration’s Clean Power Plan as a Great Leap Forward, economically as well as environmentally. As I understand it, the EPA is even claiming that requiring more energy to be generated via wind and solar will not increase its cost. That is ridiculous, of course, as wind and solar are nowhere near as »

Lions, Triggers, and Critics, Oh My!

Featured image Let’s begin with everyone’s favorite conservationist, Teddy Roosevelt. Roosevelt loved the big animals of Africa. He especially liked to shoot them. (Hat tip: Peter Huber, Hard Green.) Somehow he is still a revered figure, unlike Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson. Well times change, you say. Lions, rhinos, elephants, and other African megafauna are rare and critically endangered. Anyone who would shoot one for sport is a moral monster on par »

Civil War on the Left, Part 20

Featured image Bezerkeley, I tell ya. You may wish to hesitate before clicking through on this link, because of contains disturbing photos of naked people protesting against the removal of eucalyptus trees in that fair city, because trees are people too. Or something. Put it this way: if these folks went to a Woodstock reunion, they’d probably use LSD suppositories. Here’s the relevant part of the news story, so as to spare »

Unabomber or Unapapa?

Featured image Anyone remember the good old days when you couldn’t tell the difference between the Unabomber’s manifesto “Industrial Society and Its Future” and Al Gore’s Earth in the Balance? There was even an online quiz you could flunk. (Though to remind everyone once again, both owed more to Heidegger.) Well, it’s time to rerun that drill with Pope Francis’s encyclical on the environment. Which is exactly what Colby Cosh does in »

And Still More Environmental Epic Fail

Featured image It never rains (especially in climate change-stricken California) but it pours (which it will probably do next winter in California this El Nino-fueled year). No sooner do I deliver the latest eco-backfire news this morning that my (gluten free/non-animal-tested) in-box fills up with two fresh howlers. First, all those places like universities (natch) that are banning bottled water because there are too many plastic bottles in the waste stream? It »

More Environmental Epic Fail

Featured image Does it seem like most environmental policies backfire to some extent, or just 95 percent of them? I lately returned to the 2012 National Bureau of Economic Research paper on how electric cars are actually more polluting in some states, depending on the electricity source, e.g. if you live in Indiana, every Tesla should come with a bumper sticker that says “How Do You Like My Coal-Powered Car?”  Heh. Earlier »