Environment

Earth Day After Action Report

Featured image The indefatigable Roy Spencer offers a roundup of Earth Day cartoons yesterday on his site DrRoySpencer.com, reminding us along the way that folks who drove their cars to tree-planting ceremonies undoubtedly released more CO2 than the tree will ever absorb, before inevitably dying someday and releasing most of that CO2 into the atmosphere again anyway.  This one is especially good: But this is not satire: in the “Life-Imitates-Art” Department, behold »

Low-Information Environmentalists

Featured image I spent more time today going over some of the Gallup Poll findings on the environment, and was startled by the sharp break in opinion seen in this first chart.  Could this mean that people are starting to grasp the facts of environmental progress?  Maybe, but that sharp break makes me suspicious. It’s quite unusual to see a sharp shift like this in just a single year—about any issue.  But »

Happy Earth Day

Featured image It’s April 22, so happy Earth Day everybody.  Yes, it’s also Vladimir Lenin’s birthday, so for many on the left this actually presents little cause for confusion. The Gallup Poll reports today on the latest survey results on public attitudes about global warming climate change, which shows that while the number of true believers has barely changed since 2001, the number of people who are deeply skeptical has roughly doubled, »

Happy Birthday, Mustang

Featured image The Ford Mustang turns 50 years old this week.  Ford’s financial wizards projected that it would sell 100,000 to 125,000 units in the first year.  Even though the car got good advance reviews from the trade press, Ford’s bean counters were unenthusiastic about the Mustang because they feared the Mustang would cannibalize sales from other Ford models.  The Mustang sold 418,812 units in the first year, earning Ford over $1 »

Washington Post Falls For Left-Wing Fraud, Embarrasses Itself [Updated With Post's Response]

Featured image Today’s Washington Post features an article by Steven Mufson and Juliet Eilperin headlined, “The biggest lease holder in Canada’s oil sands isn’t Exxon Mobil or Chevron. It’s the Koch brothers.” The article was based on a newly-issued two-page report by the far-left International Forum on Globalization. The Post reported: You might expect the biggest lease owner in Canada’s oil sands, or tar sands, to be one of the international oil »

Thursday in Boulder: The Dynamic Duo

Featured image No, not that dynamic duo that runs around in underwear and capes; I mean the dynamic duo of Ted Nordhaus and Michael Shellenberger of the Breakthrough Institute.  I’ve noted them many times before here on Power Line as the most interesting and serious defectors from environmental orthodoxy while remaining firmly planted on the left/progressive side of the political spectrum.  I’m hosting them for a public lecture here at CU/Boulder this »

The Antidote for Crunchiness

Featured image Walking around downtown Boulder the other day on Pearl Street, I ran into the “Condom Squad,” which, as you’ll see from the nearby photo, consisted of fetching young ladies in tight black leggings  (the winter uniform of coeds these days) passing out massive quantities of free prophylactics, just in case there are any stray bananas that need covering up from the winter cold.  A “fitting job” I would say.  (Note »

Keystone Tea Leaves Today? (Updated)

Featured image Lots of “folks” (as Obama quaintly calls his fellow citizens) have puzzled over the language of Obama’s State of the Union speech—especially its omissions—to try to get a clue about what he may be thinking about the Keystone pipeline.  Canada is increasingly public in its fury about the delay in the decision, and when soft-spoken Canadians are publicly complaining, you know they’re really really angry. Ben Geman, a solid environmental »

Hayward vs. Hill, et al., Round 2

Featured image The head of the San Luis Obispo Air Pollution Control District, Larry Allen, has joined Adam Hill in complaining about my Forbes.com article.  Here’s his complete letter, followed by my reply: Mr. Hayward – you ought to check the accuracy and credibility of your information source(s) before you publish an article in a national magazine. Absolutely none of the information you’ve published here in this opinion/attack piece regarding me and »

So This Is Fun

Featured image I’ve been totally off the Power Line grid all day today, partly because the first week of classes last week (Con Law II, and a new course on environmental policy) went so well that I really needed to step up my game in week two, but mostly because a full-scale firefight has broken out in San Luis Obispo County about my Forbes column this week, which is derived from a »

It’s Enough to Drive You Bananas

Featured image My post yesterday about the perils of “di-hydrogen monoxide” and all the scary-sounding chemical compounds that occur naturally in bananas prompted faithful Power Line reader Jerry Heyman to direct our attention to this three-minute clip from Penn & Teller’s cable show whose name I can’t use on our family-friendly website (after all, the show is on premium cable), where a petition gatherer ropes in a lot of people to oppose »

Film Festival Censors Science: Should We Care?

Featured image The Frozen River Film Fest in Winona, Minnesota, has canceled a scheduled showing of FrackNation, a pro-fracking documentary. The cancellation, which the festival organizers concede is an instance of viewpoint-based censorship, has gotten some publicity: The documentary, FrackNation, was scheduled to be shown alongside Gasland Part 2, a factually suspect film attacking hydraulic fracturing as environmentally destructive. The showing of the anti-fracking film is, of course, going forward. “We definitely »

Don’t Go Bananas Over Chemicals

Featured image You’re probably heard of all the people who die each year in the U.S. on account of that dangerous chemical known as di-hydrogen monoxide.   As the official website for di-hydrogen monoxide explains: Dihydrogen Monoxide (DHMO) is a colorless and odorless chemical compound.  Its basis is the highly reactive hydroxyl radical, a species shown to mutate DNA, denature proteins, disrupt cell membranes, and chemically alter critical neurotransmitters. The atomic components of »

Bill Gates’s Second Career

Featured image Microsoft’s legendary Bill Gates has taken up a second career reading and reviewing books.  He’s not bad at it in some ways, and he’s taken some heterodox positions that depart from his comfortable Seattle liberalism, such as praising just about everything written by Vaclav Smil, author several fine books on energy policy and other subjects. But it’s a good thing Gates made his fortune in computer software already, as I »

The Environmental Movement: How Corrupt Is It?

Featured image We have written many times about the corruption of the global warming movement. Billions and billions of dollars are being poured into the pockets of global warming alarmists, because they perform such a valuable service: they help to persuade voters that governments should be given greater control over the world’s economies. What’s a few billion dollars when trillions are at stake? We have written mostly about the corruption of Greens »

Green Weenie of the Year: The Wind-Talkers

Featured image Connoisseurs of environmental lore may recall the time Fred Hartley, the then-chairman of Union Oil, was skewered for his comment to a Senate committee in the aftermath of the 1969 Santa Barbara oil spill that “I’m amazed at the publicity for the loss of a few birds.”  He was widely skewered for his insensitivity to nature, at a time when Americans were shocked and outraged at the front-page photos of »

Arab Media Do Another Job American Media Won’t

Featured image I’m currently reading Paul Sabin’s new book The Bet: Paul Ehrlich, Julian Simon, and Our Gamble Over Earth’s Future, just out from Yale University Press.  It was a genius idea to write a book about this epic clash between the neo-Malthusianism at the core of modern environmentalism and one of its most persistent and profound critics, the late Julian Simon.  Simon won that famous bet with Ehrlich, of course, and »