Fast and Furious

Court refuses to dismiss “Fast and Furious” documents case

Featured image The House of Representatives, as most of us recall, has demanded that the Obama administration produce records about its response to the Operation Fast and Furious gun-running scandal. President Obama refused to produce some of those records based on the assertion of executive privilege. He asserted the privilege even though, as I understand it, the documents in question were never provided to the president or his advisers The House held »

Mexican police chief killed with “fast and furious” rifle

Featured image The Fast and Furious scandal has faded somewhat from the consciousness of even President Obama’s fiercest critics. How could it not, in view of the multitude of more recent Obama administration scandals. But Fast and Furious may return to the radar screen in light of this report: A high-powered rifle lost in the ATF’s Fast and Furious controversy was used to kill a Mexican police chief in the state of »

A New Front in the Administration’s War on Journalism?

Featured image The two most honest and independent reporters in Washington are, I think, Jake Tapper, now of CNN, and CBS’s Sharyl Attkisson. I’m probably forgetting someone, but those are the two that come to mind. Ms. Attkisson reported on Fast and Furious more fearlessly and effectively than any other reporter. Today she disclosed that her personal and work computers have been “compromised.” The circumstances are being investigated: “I can confirm that »

Obama Spins Furiously On Guns

Featured image Barack Obama’s comments about guns in Mexico today demonstrated a curious lack of self-awareness. “[M]ost of the guns used to commit violence here in Mexico come from the United States.” So the violence perpetrated by Mexican drug cartels is our fault? That seemed to be the implication. But obviously, if there were not a single firearm in the U.S., the drug cartels would be just as well armed as they »

A “Fast and Furious” culprit resigns from Justice Department

Featured image Gary Grindler, Attorney General Eric Holder’s chief of staff, has resigned from the Justice Department effective tomorrow. Grindler leaves after less than two years in that position. Grindler oversaw the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, which led “Fast and Furious,” the failed and criminally stupid “gun-walking” operation that allowed Mexican cartels to obtain hundreds of illegally purchased weapons. The DOJ’s Inspector General faulted Grindler for hiding the connection »

ATF’s Fast and Furious Coverup Exposed

Featured image Darrell Issa and Charles Grassley have been releasing documents that they have obtained in connection with the Fast and Furious investigation. I have not yet seen a site where the documents are actually published, so we have to rely on news accounts of them. If any of our readers are aware of a location where we can read them for ourselves, we would appreciate hearing about it. In the meantime, »

Today’s Big News Story: Eric Holder Cited For Contempt

Featured image On nearly any other day, that would have been the headline. And who knows? Years from now, history may record that today’s most important event was the House of Representatives’ voting to hold Attorney General Eric Holder in criminal contempt by a stunning 255-67 vote. Among those voting “Yea” were 17 Democrats, so the contempt citation was bipartisan to a meaningful degree. The contempt resolution was, in my view, entirely »

Contempt Vote Against Holder To Go Forward

Featured image It was reported tonight that last-minute negotiations between House staff and Eric Holder’s Department of Justice have broken down, which means that the House will proceed with a vote that should make Holder the first Attorney General to be held in contempt of Congress. CBS, like other news outlets, begins by misrepresenting the Fast and Furious program: The Department of Justice and House Republicans have been at a stalemate regarding »

Was Fast and Furious Intended To Promote Gun Control? Another View

Featured image Paul wrote here that he doesn’t buy the theory, advanced by Bill Whittle and others, that the real purpose of the Fast and Furious program was to lend support to the assertion that the weapons used by drug gangs in Mexico come overwhelmingly when gun shops in the American Southwest, so as to advance the political cause of gun control in the U.S. Paul’s arguments were cogent as always, but »

Was Fast and Furious intended to promote gun control?

Featured image As John notes here, Bill Whittle is arguing that the Fast and Furious program was an effort by the Obama administration to increase bloodshed in Mexico and thereby lead to tougher gun control regulation in the U.S. This theory has been around for a while, and may receive a wider hearing now that Obama has asserted a weak privilege claim to prevent the disclosure of some Fast and Furious documents. »

Fast and Furious: Follow the Ideology

Featured image At PJTV, Bill Whittle makes the case that Fast and Furious was driven by Barack Obama’s and Eric Holder’s anti-gun ideology. The case is, I think, a persuasive one, as no one has offered an alternative explanation of why the administration would deliberately facilitate the shipment of thousands of guns to Mexican drug cartels, with no effort to track them unless and until they were involved in the commission of »

Why Would Anyone Trust Eric Holder?

Featured image I wrote yesterday that the Obama administration’s assertion of executive privilege with respect to Fast and Furious documents that have been subpoenaed by the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee is frivolous. If you haven’t already read it, you can check out that post to see why. In addition, I pointed out that lawyers only assert lousy claims of privilege when they have something to hide. So the presumption that »

The politics of fast and furious, Part Two

Featured image Unlike Politico, the Washington Post offers a realistic, non-partisan take on President Obama’s assertion of executive privilege. Under a headline stating that Obama has “create[d] a tricky situation,” David Nakamura recognizes that this dispute could hurt Obama. He writes: “The potential protracted legal dispute has the potential to embarrass and distract the White House during the heart of the reelection campaign.” This election is, above all else, about the economy. »

Obama’s Claim of Executive Privilege: It’s Frivolous

Featured image Today Deputy Attorney General James Cole advised Darrell Issa, Chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, that the Department of Justice will not respond to the committee’s subpoena of certain documents relating to the Fast and Furious scandal. Instead, the Obama administration is asserting a claim of executive privilege for the reasons laid out in Eric Holder’s letter to President Obama dated June 19. Holder’s letter is a »

The politics of Fast and Furious

Featured image Here’s how Politico writers Jake Sherman and Reid Epstein reported the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee’s vote to hold Eric Holder in contempt: “The Fast and Furious investigation has finally handed House Republicans a prize they’ve long sought: a legal smackdown of the Obama administration.” Can anyone imagine this lead sentence if the House had found the Attorney General in a Republican administration, Alberto Gonzalez for example, in contempt? »

Those Fast and Furious documents must be dynamite

Featured image My friend Bill Otis was a Justice Department lawyer for many years. He spent a good portion of those years as a prosecutor. He also served as an attorney in the White House Counsel’s shop, so he knows all about dealing with unpleasant congressional inventigations and demands for documents. In short, Bill is extremely very well positioned to comment knowledgably on the dispute between Rep. Issa’s Committee and Eric Holder, »

White House asserts executive privilege claim to further DOJ’s Fast and Furious cover-up

Featured image With the House of Representatives poised to hold Attorney General Eric Holder in contempt, President Obama has granted Holder’s request to assert executive privilege in refusing to turn over documents to Congress related to the Fast and Furious scandal. This won’t insulate Holder from being held in contempt. Rather, the White House presumably hopes the assertion will improve Holder’s position if/when his dispute with the House reaches the judicial system. »