Higher education

Dartmouth is catering to, not ignoring, its black students

Featured image Joe Asch notes the difficulty that Dartmouth’s black students have had in citing grievances that would cause a rational person of good faith to become enraged. The complaints cited by Jennifer McGrew, for example, cannot rationally explain why angry black students would confront, curse at, and in some instances assault white students in Baker Library. Even Randall Kennedy, an African-American law professor at Harvard whose academic work has often focused »

The Hollow Soul of Our Universities

Featured image We’ve seen at several colleges—most explicitly at Amherst—the call to curtail free speech and academic freedom in favor of particular claims to “social justice.” I keep expecting someone to say any time now: “The much vaunted ‘academic freedom’ will be driven from the . . . university, for this freedom is spurious because purely negative.” Sounds about right, no? What’s missing from the ellipses above? The word “German.” Go plug »

Announcing the Coolidge Scholarship

Featured image Calvin Coolidge doesn’t get as much ink in the history books — or the election stories — as he deserves. The words “Calvin Coolidge” simply aren’t uttered enough. That’s a shame since Coolidge stood for a number of principles we esteem: civility, limited government, thrift, low taxes, federalism, and responsible citizenship. Now the Coolidge name is about to get a powerful boost from the 17-19 year old set. That’s because »

A Modest Proposal for Princeton and Yale

Featured image Richard Epstein reviews the sorry record of Woodrow Wilson over at Ricochet, but concludes correctly that it is a stupid idea to start stripping names off of university programs. But if the prissy Princetonians insist on renaming the Woodrow Wilson School for Public Affairs, here’s a modest suggestion: Rename it for Warren Harding! Harding was the anti-Wilson in all of the ways the campus protesters could want. He pardoned most »

How’s that river shaping up for you?

Featured image In his article about the troubles at his alma mater, my Princeton alumnus friend noted the role of William Bowen, Provost from 1967 to 1972 and President from 1972 to 1988. Not content with screwing up Princeton, Bowen co-wrote (with former Harvard President Derek Bok) a defense of race-based preferential college admissions. The book bears the odd title The Shape of the River. In The Shape of the River, Bowen »

Princeton’s troubles, an alumnus’ perspective

Featured image A distinguished alumnus of Princeton comments on the University’s long descent into leftism and its disturbing practice of pandering to infantile race-mongers: The recent events at Princeton University are the culmination of the leftist takeover of Princeton that began in the late 1960s with the rise of people like William Bowen (Provost 1967 to 1972, President 1972 to 1988), Shirley Tilghman (long-time professor, President 2001 to 2013), and many others »

At Princeton, Wilson under review

Featured image At Princeton, events have coughed up today’s blather from President Eisgruber. A reader has forwarded the email below to the Princeton community. President Eisgruber recapitulates the regnant platitudes at great length. Chalk him up as another of the academy’s gutless wimps. Long story short: blah blah blah. Slightly longer story: they’re going to be exploring the legacy of Woodrow Wilson. I recommend that President Eisgruber et al. read R.J. Pestritto’s »

Adult leadership remembered

Featured image A loyal reader and MIT ’68 alum writes from Brussels to draw our attention to this letter in Saturday’s Wall Street Journal about what he calls “the raging madness on US campuses.” Here is the letter: Regarding your editorial “Bonfire of the Academy” (Nov. 11): The editors lament the lack of “adult leadership” at today’s universities. It wasn’t always so. I was at MIT in the late 1960s, and we »

Groucho for (College) President

Featured image How about Groucho Marx for college president? Maybe instead of saying “horsefeathers!” to all the nonsense on campus, we should just do a screening of Horse Feathers. But I’m sure it would require a trigger warning. President Groucho: “We’re neglecting football for education!” “Where will the students sleep?” “Where they always sleep—the classroom!” “I think you know what the trustees can do with their suggestions.” »

A copycat league

Featured image The Ivy League has long been a copycat league, especially when it comes to its students. In the late 1960s, Dartmouth’s radical activists consciously copied our Harvard counterparts. However, Dartmouth’s administration, learning from Harvard’s response, handled our takeover of the administration building with more savvy, thus avoiding much of the post-takeover turmoil we had hoped to generate. Flash forward 45 years or so, and we see black protests over nothing »

Dartmouth’s disgrace, Hanlon edition

Featured image My first term at Dartmouth I took a great freshman seminar with Professor Peter Bien on Politics and the Novel. We read A Passage to India, Under Western Eyes, The Secret Agent, Guard of Honor, Freedom or Death, The Trial, and a few others. One of my classmates in the seminar was John Floberg. John went through Dartmouth on Navy ROTC, served his tour of duty, went to medical school, »

Does “mismatch” help explain militant black fragility?

Featured image How should we explain the fact that black student militancy is now manifesting itself in the disruption of campus libraries and demands for postponement of exams? Here’s one plausible explanation: mismatch is to blame. “Mismatch” refers to the fact that, due to aggressive race-based admissions preferences, many African-American college students fall short of the white students with whom they attend school in terms of the credentials most closely associated with »

The ancient virus, CUNY edition

Featured image Anti-Semitism has emerged as a potent force on many college campuses. The rule of political correctness have freed it up to stand naked and unashamed. Take a look at the brief video below from a student protest at CUNY Hunter; Ruthie Blum writes about it in the Alegemeiner column posted here. According to Ruthie, the protest in took place in Manhattan on Thursday afternoon after organizers on Facebook called for »

The spreading virus, part 4

Featured image A recent Dartmouth alum provides this summary of events on campus yesterday based on reports from one of her closest friends still on campus: My friend is texting me about a Black Lives Matter protest that happened at Dartmouth last night. Apparently it started as a standard march and chant across campus and devolved into black students screaming at individuals in the library and calling them out by name for »

The Fraudulence of Leftist Professors

Featured image Melissa Click is the harridan seen calling for “muscle” to get rid of reporters and camera men covering left-wing festivities at the University of Missouri: So who is Melissa Click? She is an Assistant Professor at Missouri and has a PhD in communication from the University of Massachusetts. What was the subject of her dissertation? “It’s ‘a good thing’: The commodification of femininity, affluence and whiteness in the Martha Stewart »

Where is the evidence of the Mizzou swastika?

Featured image Of the small number of instances of alleged bad behavior that forms the basis for the frenzy at the University of Missouri, one stands out: the claim that someone drew a swastika out of feces on a restroom door in a dormitory. Any swastika is deeply offensive, of course, though the drawing of one hardly reflects the “systematic oppression” that hysterical students say exists at their school. But there’s a »

Rules for student radicals

Featured image Forty-five years ago, James Epperson, one of Dartmouth’s great English professors, said of the college’s radicals that they can’t distinguish between their personal anxiety and their political beliefs (or words to that effect). As a student radical at the time, my thought was “as if this is easy to do.” Today’s student radicals, though they differ from the rads of my time in that they seem more fragile, have the »