Immigration

Hysterical congressman calls John Kelly a “disgrace to the uniform he used to wear”

Featured image Rep. Luis Gutierrez, Congressman open-borders himself, went on a rant today against John Kelly, the White House chief of staff. Gutierrez pronounced Kelly, who served in the Marines for more than 40 years, “a hypocrite who is a disgrace to the uniform he used to wear.” Gutierrez added that Kelly “has no honor and should be drummed out of the White House along with the white supremacists and those enabling »

Testing the Ratchet Effect

Featured image The “Ratchet Effect” is the well-known theorem that once liberals get a social welfare program in place, it is nearly impossible for a subsequent conservative government to roll it back. Margaret Thatcher did privatize a lot of nationalized industries in Britain, but then socialist or Labour Party governments did the same thing in New Zealand, Australia, and even France back in the 1980s, as the incompetence of government ownership of »

Obama weighs in on DACA, disingenuously

Featured image Former President Obama takes to Facebook to attack President Trump’s decision to phase out DACA. As one would expect, Obama’s piece is a masterpiece of misdirection. Scott has posted the full text of Obama’s statement. As Scott says, the former president indulges in his favorite pastimes: question begging, condescension, and attempting to make his opponents out to be indecent, immoral and stupid. I found this passage from Obama’s statement telling: »

Dreams from Obama

Featured image One of the defining characteristics of President Obama that we disliked most was his disdain for the rule of law. If he could get his way, he might take the prescribed route to his destination. If not, he took a shortcut, with his phone and his pen. He even bragged about it. Obama’s DACA program — a supposedly temporary stopgap — represents the quintessence of his monarchical disposition. Before he »

President Trump and the rule of law

Featured image President Trump should have ended the DACA program, or at least announced its phasing out, as soon as he took office. Nonetheless, his decision to announce its phasing out now, assuming he sticks to it, represents a victory for the rule of law. The legal status of “dreamers” is a matter for Congress, not the executive, to decide. Even President Obama said so before he elected to decide the matter »

On DACA, Let’s Make a Deal

Featured image Two headlines in today’s news are, I hope, related: “Trump expected to end program for young immigrants,” and, in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, an op-ed by President Trump himself: “We must fix our self-destructive tax code.” Paul wrote earlier today about Trump’s reported DACA decision, considering it on a stand-alone basis. Everything he wrote is, I think, true. DACA was obviously unconstitutional, and Trump has merely stated (or is expected »

Trump expected to end DACA, and should

Featured image By all accounts, President Trump is about to phase out the DACA program. DACA grants work permits to about 800,000 undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children Trump reportedly will delay terminating the program for six months. This gives Congress time to pass legislation to replace it, if Congress chooses to do so. Trump has made the right decision. As Hans von Spakovsky argues, under our Constitution, Congress »

Justice Scalia on “the very human realities” in Arpaio’s Arizona

Featured image Whichever way one comes down regarding President Trump’s pardon of Sheriff Joe Arpaio, I think it’s important to recognize the context in which Arpaio took the over-zealous law enforcement actions that led to his conviction. That context was described by Justice Scalia in his opinion (concurring in part and dissenting in part) in Arizona v. U.S., a decision that struck down in large measure an Arizona immigration enforcement law called »

Trump pardons Joe Arpaio

Featured image President Trump today issued a pardon to the man he calls “Sheriff Joe” — Joe Arpaio, the former sheriff of Maricopa County, Arizona. Arpaio was convicted of failing to follow a court order to end the practice of detaining people based on the suspicion that they lack legal status and turning them over to the border patrol. The White House provided this explanation of the pardon: Arpaio’s life and career, »

DACA at the five year mark

Featured image Mark Krikorian points out that today is the fifth anniversary of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. DACA is President Obama’s lawless amnesty diktat. It enables adult illegal aliens who claim to have come to the U.S. before age 16 to get work permits, Social Security numbers, driver’s licenses, etc. Nearly 800,000 people have done so. Candidate Donald Trump promised to end DACA on “day one.” Like much »

The RAISE Act: A Step In the Right Direction, But Nowhere Near Enough

Featured image A reader who is a long-time immigration skeptic and a close student of the issue takes off from a Ross Douthat column on the proposed RAISE Act: Douthat writes: …you can address many of the costs of mass immigration by embracing the new bill’s points system without also making its steep cuts. Puh-leeez!……“steep cuts”? That’s absurd to the point of being intentionally obtuse, if not outright mendacious! The proposal is »

In praise of the RAISE Act, Part Two

Featured image A friend and long-time Power Line reader has this to say in response to my post in praise of the RAISE Act — the immigration reform proposal of Sens. Cotton and Perdue that President Trump forcefully endorsed yesterday: Yesterday on my drive home, I listened to a long NPR radio story about the bill’s introduction. As the story ended, I drove past a large apartment complex that is being built »

Associated Press Smears Stephen Miller [Updated]

Featured image Yesterday’s dustup between presidential aide Stephen Miller and CNN’s Jim Acosta, which Scott wrote about here, has turned into one of the silliest kerfuffles in memory. (Video is at the link, a transcript of yesterday’s press briefing is here.) The idea that a poem somehow stands in the way of reforming our immigration system (the salient features of which, by the way, date only to 1965) is absurd. Yet the »

In praise of the RAISE Act

Featured image In February, I wrote about the Reforming American Immigration for Strong Employment (RAISE) Act. This legislation, proposed by Sens. Tom Cotton and David Perdue, would cut legal immigration to the U.S. in half and prioritize high-skilled immigrants, while ending family preferences for all but the spouses and minor children of U.S. citizens and legal permanent legal residents. Today, President Trump, with the two sponsoring Senators by his side, publicly backed »

Accosting Acosta

Featured image CNN reporter Jim Acosta loves the limelight at the White House press briefings and doesn’t particularly mind if he makes a fool of himself in the process. Of course, it helps not to know when you’re making a fool of yourself. At today’s White House press briefing Acosta sought to debate White House adviser Stephen Miller on the merits of the of the Reforming American Immigration for a Strong Economy »

By European Standards, Macron Is Courageous

Featured image During the French presidential election, Emmanuel Macron didn’t impress me. He seemed like the mother country’s version of Justin Trudeau. But earlier this month, he scandalized proper opinion in the EU with some straight talk about Africa: At a G20 summit press conference in Hamburg on July 8, French President Emmanuel Macron answered a call for an African “Marshall Plan” from a Cote d’Ivoire journalist. Macron’s stern, clear-eyed rebuff to »

What would Sessions’ ouster mean for immigration?

Featured image President Trump’s latest attack on Jeff Sessions is perhaps his most stupid. Here is what Trump told the Wall Street Journal: When they say he endorsed me, I went to Alabama. I had 40,000 people. He was a senator from Alabama. I won the state by a lot, massive numbers. A lot of the states I won by massive numbers. But he was a senator, he looks at 40,000 people »