John Kasich

Trump-Kasich, a ticket that wasn’t meant to be

Featured image As this year’s primary season wore on and voters showed little or no enthusiasm for John Kasich in state after state, the question became why the Ohio governor remained in the race. Candidates as popular as Kasich — e.g., Jeb Bush — and more popular — Marco Rubio — called it quits, but Kasich persisted. Some thought that Kasich was hanging in there to take votes away from Donald Trump’s »

Thoughts on the Cruz-Kasich non-aggression pact

Featured image Today came word that Ted Cruz and John Kasich have agreed to coordinate in future primary contests in an attempt to keep Donald Trump’s delegate count as low as possible. The two remaining Trump rivals reportedly agreed to stand aside in certain states where they do not pose a credible threat to the tycoon. Thus, Kasich wouldn’t actively seek votes in Indiana and Cruz wouldn’t actively seek them in Oregon »

Romney will back Cruz; so should we all

Featured image Mitt Romney has announced that he will support Ted Cruz in next week’s Utah caucuses. Romney explained that supporting Cruz is the only effective way to prevent Donald Trump from winning the nomination: The only path that remains to nominate a Republican rather than Mr. Trump is to have an open convention. At this stage, the only way we can reach an open convention is for Senator Cruz to be »

Trump crushes Rubio, but Kasich wins in Ohio [updated periodically]

Featured image It looks like there will be no surprises on the Republican side tonight. As expected, Donald Trump is the runaway winner in Florida. He leads Marco Rubio 46-27 with most of the voted counted. It’s an impressive victory, one that has caused Rubio to drop out of the race. In Ohio, however, John Kasich leads Trump 43-34, and the networks have just called the race for the Governor. On the »

John Kasich says “reward me”

Featured image Marco Rubio is encouraging his supporters to vote for John Kasich in the Ohio primary. He reasons that he can’t win there and that the next best thing to a victory is a result that halts the Trump express. Kasich is in the same position in Florida. He can’t win there — he isn’t even campaigning — but a Rubio win would be a blow to Trump. Kasich, however, is »

On Libya, Kasich is right, Rubio is wrong, and Trump is lying

Featured image During last night’s debate, Ted Cruz criticized Marco Rubio for supporting U.S. military intervention in Libya to topple the Qaddafi regime. Qaddafi’s demise has, of course, resulted in awful consequences, including, but certainly not limited to, the rise of ISIS in Libya Rubio responded that he supported our intervention because it was foregone conclusion that Qaddafi would fall and he wanted the U.S. to facilitate a satisfactory post-Qaddafi future. Unfortunately, »

Can the GOP field be reduced, in time, to two?

Featured image David French at NRO looks at polling data for upcoming GOP presidential races. He finds the numbers “great for Trump [and] terrible for everyone else.” There’s a paradox at work here, however. If the numbers are terrible for two of the three candidates in the credible non-Trump field (Cruz, Rubio, and Kasich) and merely bad for the third candidate, then that’s not so good for Trump. Here’s why. For Trump »

The GOP race, two scenarios [UPDATED]

Featured image Earlier today, John laid out a plausible and optimistic scenario for how the Republican presidential race will play out. He suggested that even if Ben Carson and John Kasich do not drop out of the race, their voters will start to fall away and most of them will gravitate towards Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz (probably more to Rubio than Cruz). In this scenario, the race will become effectively a »

A “good” night for Kasich?

Featured image Henry Enten at FiveThirtyEight writes: If you’re trying to read the tea leaves in the early results, you can already see how tonight could be a good one for John Kasich. He’s doing about as well as Jon Huntsman did in Lebanon in the western part of the state. If he can match Huntsman’s numbers in other places, it will probably be good enough for 17 percent statewide and second »

Tell me why

Featured image Tell me why no one attacked John Kasich last night. He’s leading the governors/former governors in New Hampshire, and conventional wisdom holds that only one (or at most two) governors will survive the New Hampshire primary. He’s a bona threat to finish ahead of Marco Rubio (and this was true even before last night) and Ted Cruz. If he finishes a close second, he could even hurt Trump going forward. »

Chris Christie’s suicide mission may make this a good night for Trump and Kasich [With Comment by John]

Featured image The first portion of tonight’s GOP debate, as well as the post-debate coverage, was dominated by the clash between Chris Christie and Marco Rubio. Christie assailed Rubio for not having governing experience and compared him to Barack Obama, who was also a first-term Senator when he ran for president. In addition, Christie criticized Rubio for allegedly relying on 25-second sound bites. Rubio responded by saying, in effect, that Obama’s problem »

Comedy Writing at the NY Times

Featured image There are some days I wonder whether the editorial page of the New York Times is really just a training ground for deadpan comedy writers. Surely Leslie Nielsen and Lloyd Bridges at their faux-serious best in Airplane! can’t match the ironic hilarity of the Times editorial endorsements yesterday of Hillary Clinton and John Kasich. Of Hillary Clinton, for example, the Times tells us: Democratic primary voters, on the other hand, »

Live from Council Bluffs, it’s John Kasich

Featured image Nebraska attorney David Begley continues his series of reports for us on the appearance of the presidential candidates in Iowa. Yesterday Ohio Governor John Kasich appeared in Council Bluffs. Dave was there and Dave was impressed. His report is below: The candidate polling at 10 percent and tied for second in New Hampshire vote appeared before a full house last night in Council Bluffs, Iowa. The temperature was 14 degrees. »

Philosophy and the Republican debate

Featured image In the absence of gotcha questions at Tuesday’s debate, philosophy moved to the fore. It was trashed twice. In an exchange with Ted Cruz over a hypothetical bailout of Bank of America, John Kasich said: That’s the difference of being an executive. And let me just explain: when a bank is ready to go under, and depositors are getting ready to lose their life savings, you just don’t say we »

The Kasich kritique

Featured image In the adjacent post I note that John Kasich is bidding to become the media’s favorite candidate. This is not a case of unrequited love; the ardor is reciprocated. At MRCTV, Brittany Hughes highlights Katich’s take on the CNBC proceedings (video below): “Kasich: ‘I was very appreciative’ of CNBC moderators.” Now that is funny. Let’s just say it makes him something of an outlier in more ways than one. »

Live from Council Bluffs, it’s John Kasich

Featured image Nebraska attorney David Begley continues his series of reports on appearances of the presidential candidates in Iowa for us. Yesterday Dave attended the appearance of Ohio Governor John Kasich in Council Bluffs, Iowa: Why would Power Line readers be interested in John Kasich? In the first place he has decent poll numbers. The Real Clear Politics average has him at 10 percent or fourth in New Hampshire. Nationally, Bloomberg has »

Two signs that Kasich’s conservatism is tepid

Featured image This has been a good summer for the non-career politicians — Donald Trump, Ben Carson, and Carly Fiorini — in the GOP presidential field. But it’s also been a good summer for longtime politician John Kasich. In fact, Kasich, who entered the race late, is now second in the RCP poll average in New Hampshire. He’s fractionally ahead of Jeb Bush but trails Donald Trump by a wide margin (24.7-11.0) »