Liberals

Liberal Follies on the Minneapolis City Council

Featured image This headline in the Minneapolis Star Tribune caught my eye: Mpls. City Council president frustrated, angry over racial equity plan. Here is the story: In a rare display of emotion, City Council President Barb Johnson said she’s frustrated and angry at the time employees at Minneapolis City Hall are spending on a plan to close racial disparities, noting the rampant gunshots and other problems afflicting her North Side ward. … »

Picking on Piketty: Why He Won’t Fade Away, and Why His Message Won’t Work

Featured image Pretty clearly Thomas Piketty is making a bid to become the most popular French export to America since Bridgett Bardot, but the difference is that Bardot had more substance to her.  There are numerous devastating critiques of his framework for arguing we need a wealth tax, though above all I’ve never once heard someone explain how higher taxes on the rich will benefit the middle and working classes.  (You don’t »

Slow Learners on the Left

Featured image I know, being on the Left means you’re a slow learner by definition, but still, the story reported the other day that former leftist Congressman David Bonior (D-Managua) has become an entrepreneur and discovered, lo and behold!— regulations are slow and costly!  From the Washington Post earlier this week: Bonior said if he had the power, he would lighten up on pesky regulations. “It took us a ridiculous amount of »

“The debate is over” — a core progressive tenet

Featured image Joel Kotkin writes about the spread of “debate is over” syndrome. It’s a good article, but marred by the author’s surprise that this “embrace homogeneity of viewpoint” finds expression by the American left, “the same people who historically have identified themselves with open-mindedness and the defense of free speech.” Actually, “debate is over” syndrome expresses a core tenet of American progressivism, and one that has been present from the beginning. »

Roots of totalitarian liberalism

Featured image With the cashiering of Brendan Eich as Mozilla’s chief executive officer last week, we are struggling to understand what we have just seen. There is an important book that remains to be written about the totalitarian imperative at the heart of liberalism, and the insight into the nature of the larger forces at work is one of the many reasons Eich’s forced departure strikes a nerve. It is a revealing »

Mayor Hodges submits

Featured image In the “closing argument” she made on her own behalf in her (Minneapolis) mayoral campaign this past October, Betsy Hodges checked all the right (left) boxes. To borrow Samuel Johnson’s formulation regarding Metaphysical poetry, she violently yoked a couple of heterogeneous ideas together at the heart of her mind-numbing speech: “I have worn hijab, and it changed me. I have run and danced my way through the gay pride parade.” »

Romney was right, corporations are people too

Featured image Mitt Romney received much criticism for saying during his 2012 presidential campaign that “corporations are people, my friend.” In the same connection, liberals (though not all) have rallied behind the idea that, by their very nature, corporations cannot hold religious beliefs for purposes of the First Amendment. But Romney was right. Corporations have feelings and emotions — like pride, disappointment, and humility — and they are capable of feeling hurt. »

The rise of totalitarian liberalism

Featured image George Orwell gave us a look at the operation of a totalitarian one-party state in 1984. This week Mozilla gave us a look at its nascent liberal variant. Recently appointed CEO Brandon Eich was officially made a nonperson. He was dispatched down the memory hole as the company announced that he has “step[ped] down from his role as CEO” as a result of his contribution of $1,000 to the passage »

Mozilla speaks, sort of

Featured image Under the heading “Brendan Eich steps down as CEO,” Mozilla has posted the following statement in the name of executive chairwoman Mitchell Baker. Eich has “stepped down” from his position at Mozilla days after his appointment, following the revelation that he contributed $1,000 to the campaign supporting the passage of Prop 8 in California six years ago. The Wall Street Journal covers the story here. Baker’s statement is must reading, »

Today’s Most Ominous News Story… [Updated]

Featured image …is the resignation of Brendan Eich as CEO of Mozilla, the company that makes the Firefox browser. Eich is a superstar in the world of technology; among other things, he invented Javascript and was one of the founders of Mozilla. But in 2008 he contributed $1,000 to support Proposition 8, the California ballot proposition that defended traditional marriage. For that, he was pilloried by left-wing activists. He lasted barely more »

Liberal fascism revisited

Featured image The hearing of the Hobby Lobby case by the Supreme Court this week inspired Kevin Williamson to meditate on the deeper currents running through it. Williamson’s NRO column is “The right not to be implicated” and I commend it to your attention. Williamson notes the dramatic revision of public orthodoxy that moves us “from forbidden to compulsory in record time, and vice versa.” He invites us to consider the case »

Our Criminal Justice System? It’s a Crime

Featured image One of the hallmarks of a totalitarian state is that there are so many laws and regulations that no one can possibly know what they are, let alone obey them. Thus everyone is a criminal, and only the despot’s discretion separates the solid citizen from the criminal. Unfortunately, the United States is rapidly approaching–if it has not already reached–this dystopian status. So Glenn Reynolds’s great column in USA Today should »

If Liberals Understood Economics…

Featured image …what a wonderful world it would be! Do liberals actually think about what the consequences of their policies will be, or do they vote for measures solely because it makes them feel good about themselves? At Cafe Hayek, law professor Todd Henderson emails to point out a basic contradiction in liberal policy prescriptions: Perhaps you’ve made this connection before, but reading all your posts about the minimum wage and global »

A New Low For Liberal Haters?

Featured image This is perhaps, the final proof that modern liberalism is all about hating people, not helping people. Like so many instances of left-wing lunacy, it involves the Koch brothers. Specifically, David Koch, who gave New York-Presbyterian Hospital $100 million toward construction of a new outpatient facility. This is how the hospital described Koch’s gift: Hospital trustee and longtime supporter David H. Koch has made the lead gift of $100 million »

Mayor de Blah-sio, or Oblasio?

Featured image H.L. Mencken’s line that “democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hard” comes to mind when looking at New York and Washington right now.  Americans seem to need to be reminded every now and then just what high octane liberalism is like, but better if this laboratory of liberalism is confined to New York City, Illinois, Detroit, etc. »

In search of an honest liberal

Featured image George Will began his career in journalism as the Washington editor of National Review, a perch from which he served as a relentless expositor and critic of the lies of Watergate perpetrated by the Nixon administration. In his history of National Review, former NR senior editor Jeffrey Hart recalls: National Review responded to the developing scandal with condemnation for the violation of constitutional norms mixed with a great deal of »

More Proof That Liberals Are Humorless Losers

Featured image Some years back I contributed a short squib to National Review’s roster of the 100 best conservative films out of Hollywood on behalf of Ghostbusters, not merely for making the bad guy a buffoon from the EPA, but for noting that the private sector, unlike government or universities, “expects results.” Lo and behold, along comes Thomas Frank, the lefty author of What’s The Matter With Kansas for Not Voting Like »