Media Bias

Washington Post has Obama’s back on Robert Bergdahl

Featured image Robert Bergdahl is a already a major embarrassment for President Obama. Not only did the senior Bergdahl, with his Taliban-style beard, break into Pashto and Arabic during Obama’s would-be photo opportunity, he has made a string of anti-American, pro-Taliban statements (see below). The potential for further embarrassment seems great. Bergdahl either loves to explain himself, loves the sound of his own voice, or both. It’s not clear to me whether »

Reporters Shocked When Their Targets Talk Back

Featured image Media Matters has an interesting interview with Daniel Schulman, an editor at Mother Jones who has written a book on the Koch brothers. The main topic of the interview is Koch Industries’ aggressive response to journalists who try to smear the company and its owners: “In terms of the general P.R. operation, I think that KochFacts itself has been pretty effective at giving reporters pause,” Schulman said. “Now you know »

Analyze this

Featured image Yesterday’s New York Times featured Nicholas Confessore’s long page-one story on David (mostly) and Charles Koch. I wrote about it in “A campaign you may have missed.” Today’s Times brings Confessore’s relatively brief story on Tom Steyer, a sort of (hypocritical and narrowly self-interested) liberal counterpart to the public-spirited involvement of the Koch brothers. Steyer has committed to raising $100 million promoting “climate” issues on behalf of Democratic Senate campaigns »

And the winner is…

Featured image Ed Driscoll has posted videos, an audio podcast, and a transcript of the proceedings at last week’s gala Duranty Award ceremony. They are all accessible here. Ed has posted an hour-long master video followed by individual ten-minute long clips of each speaker (Roger Simon, Ron Radosh, Claudia Rosett, and Roger Kimball), with introductions by James Taranto. New York Times reporter David Kirkpatrick took home the Duranty award for his Benghazi »

In Duranty’s footsteps

Featured image New York Times reporter David Kirkpatrick had some stiff competition for the 2013 Duranty Prize, but Roger Simon reports that he prevailed over runners-up Candy Crowley and John Judis in the ceremony held Monday night in New York. Kirkpatrick was recognized for his supposedly thorough unraveling of the Benghazi affair, “A Deadly Mix in Benghazi.” Roger explains that Kirkpatrick’s account “was revealed almost instantly to be a meretricious piece of »

Scandal? What Scandal?

Featured image How will the Democratic Party press try to defend the Obama administration over Benghazi? It won’t: it will ignore the story and hope it goes away. To the extent that liberals comment on Benghazi, it will be to mock conservatives for being concerned about it, without ever explaining what the scandal is all about. Here are two examples. Steve Sack has been the editorial cartoonist at the Minneapolis Star Tribune »

Steyer Takes Handoff From Washington Post: More Evidence of Collaboration? [Updated]

Featured image To recap what by now is a familiar story: the Washington Post ran an article suggesting that Koch Industries would be the principal beneficiary of the Keystone Pipeline by virtue of its minor leasehold interest in Canadian tar sands–a complete fiction. I took the article apart here and here, pointing out, among many other things, that Keystone would actually be damaging to Koch’s economic interests. In the latter post, I »

Whitehouse and Waxman Still Demagoguing Keystone

Featured image If you are a regular reader, you know the story: six months ago, a fringe left-wing group put out a silly report that tried to tie Koch Industries to the Keystone Pipeline. I debunked that report, pointing out that Keystone would actually be adverse to Koch’s economic interests and that Koch has taken no position on whether it should be built. No one heard anything more about that report until »

When it comes to spying, secrecy and accountability are not mutually exclusive

Featured image Barton Gellman, who led a Washington Post team that revealed NSA surveillance measures, has argued that our interest in “self-government” requires that the public know “the secret policy decisions the government is making for us.” I have responded that our interest in self-government is sufficiently vindicated in cases like spying that require secrecy as long as the political process determines who makes the secret decisions and provides for checks against »

Annals of journalistic self-aggrandizement and congratulation

Featured image The Washington Post has received a Pulitzer public service medal for its role in revealing secrets of the National Security Agency (NSA). It’s natural that journalists and those associated with them wish to celebrate this sort of disclosure. Their interest is in selling newspapers, conferring status on their profession, and influencing public policy (not necessarily in that order). Even assuming that they are also interested in promoting national security, any »

My Questions to Juliet Eilperin, and a Message to Jeff Bezos

Featured image Over the last few minutes, I sent the following four tweets to Washington Post reporter/Democratic Party propagandist Juliet Eilperin: Why won’t you answer my questions about whether your false reporting on Keystone is coordinated with the Democratic Party? You know perfectly well that Keystone has nothing to do with Koch. Why do you perpetrate a lie, along with Whitehouse and Waxman? You know that Keystone would damage Koch economically. Why »

The Washington Post Is Still Stonewalling

Featured image It is now 20 days since Washington Post reporters Juliet Eilperin and Steven Mufson published their infamous hit piece that tried to fool readers into believing that the Keystone Pipeline, the bete noire of the Democratic Party’s biggest donors, is somehow all about Koch Industries, which has nothing to do with the pipeline and would, in fact, be damaged by it economically. It is 14 days since Sheldon Whitehouse and »

The Washington Post Corrects, Disingenuously

Featured image On March 20, the Washington Post published an article by Steven Mufson and Julie Eilperin, the import of which was that Koch Industries is the driving force behind the Keystone Pipeline. The article, based entirely on a six-month-old report by a far-left group called the International Forum on Globalization that I demolished last October, was headlined, “The biggest lease holder in Canada’s oil sands isn’t Exxon Mobil or Chevron. It’s »

Washington Post: No Correction, But You Can Have a Reprint of the Article!

Featured image After I demolished a Washington Post article that tried to link Koch Industries to the Keystone Pipeline, the Post promised Koch a correction. That correction has yet to appear, but in the meantime, the Post’s “authorized content management agent” has offered Koch reprints of the article, as a “unique and powerful marketing opportunity.” You can’t make this stuff up. Here is a screen shot of the email; click to enlarge: »

The Leland Yee Story, As a Free Press Would Tell It

Featured image The Leland Yee story is one of the most remarkable in years. A California State Senator, Yee has long been a leading spokesman for gun control–it’s all for the children, you know. A popular politician who represents around one-half of San Francisco, Yee was about to run for Secretary of State when he was arrested for gun running. Specifically, he acted as an intermediary to buy shoulder-fired missiles and automatic »

Bombshell In WaPo/Keystone Scandal: Did the Post Coordinate With Congressional Democrats?

Featured image A major development occurred today in the scandal surrounding the Washington Post’s attempt to advance Democratic Party talking points by falsely linking Koch Industries to the Keystone Pipeline. In the unlikely event that you are not already familiar with the story, you should begin by reading this post and this one, as well as the one from last October where I dismantled the International Forum on Globalization report that was »

The Post: Depantsed but not deloused

Featured image Commenting on John Hinderaker’s two rounds with the Washington Post’s Steven Mufson and Juliet Eilperin, Brit Hume renders this judgment on Twitter: Two @washingtonpost reporters respond to @powerlineblog's evisceration of their work. They get eviscerated again. http://t.co/6dgRw1amdP — Brit Hume (@brithume) March 22, 2014 “Eviscerate” means “disembowel.” Brit is an experienced journalist. His judgment carries the weight of his standing in the profession. I think he has it exactly right, »