Media Bias

John Brennan’s knowable “unknowables”

Featured image John Brennan spoke to the press yesterday about Dianne Feinstein’s travesty of a report on past CIA interrogation practices. It’s highly unusual for the CIA director to hold take questions from the media, but Brennan did. Unusual though Brennan’s appearance was, the Washington Post, which has devoted its front page to story after story on Feinstein’s hit-job, relegates Brennan to page 14. The Post, it appears, is only marginally more »

James Risen would prefer not to; Eric Holder must decide what he prefers

Featured image James Risen is the New York Times reporter who, on several occasions, has materially harmed the United States with his reporting on top secret affairs. As Scott Johnson has written, “If you are a disgruntled intelligence officer or official and want to preserve your anonymity while undermining a top secret program or aiding the enemies of the United States, Risen is your go-to guy.” Scott went on to document this »

Rolling Stone Rape Story In Tatters

Featured image As investigation into Rolling Stone’s sensational story about an alleged gang rape at the University of Virginia continues, the story unravels further. The Washington Post has interviewed the three friends who saw the alleged victim, Jackie, after the alleged assault. They say that their interactions with her were completely different from the utterly implausible callousness described by Sabrina Erdely, Rolling Stone’s reporter. Most damning is the fact that what Jackie »

New York Times Corrections, State Capital Edition

Featured image Today the New York Times published a correction to an op-ed that appeared in the paper on November 27. The op-ed, by Ned Blackhawk, was about the Sand Creek massacre, an evergreen memory for liberals who see only the bad in American history: An Op-Ed article last Friday attributed an erroneous distinction to the Union general Patrick Edward Connor and the Colorado governor John Evans, who were involved in massacres »

A Bad Week for Rape Culture

Featured image As Steve noted earlier today, Rolling Stone magazine has backed off from its blockbuster story about an alleged gang rape at the University of Virginia. I wrote here that the story, written by an activist and based entirely on anonymous sources, was incredible on its face. “Jackie,” the alleged victim in the story, was gang raped by seven men in a fraternity house, but didn’t go to the police. Seriously? »

The Spirit of Salem Lives On

Featured image I was in graduate school in southern California 30 years ago when the McMartin preschool sex abuse scandal erupted in the news media, featuring incredible tales of Satanic rituals, underground tunnels, group sex with animals and children, and various alleged acrobatic acts that would challenge Cirque du Soliel, all believed credulously by the media and California prosecutors. A six-year criminal trial ultimately concluded that the charges were all bogus—every single »

The Washington Post’s bogus Benghazi end-zone dance

Featured image The Washington Post, in an editorial called “Benghazi debunked,” claims that the House Intelligence Committee has “dump[ed] cold water on the GOP’s conspiracy theories” regarding Benghazi. The Post cites three alleged “GOP conspiracy theories:” (1) that the White House tried to obscure the fact that al Qaeda-linked terrorists were behind the attacks, (2) that stand-down orders were issued to those who were in a position to aid the compound, and »

Why did the New York Times say where Darren Wilson lives?

Featured image On Monday, the day when the grand jury declined to indict Darren Wilson and rioting ensued, the New York Times published a story that provided the name of the town and the street where Wilson lives. The Times gave out this information in the context of reporting that Wilson married a fellow police officer Barbara Spradling in a “quiet wedding” last month, and that the two own a home together. »

A Pryor/Cotton footnote

Featured image In the run-up to the mid-term elections Atlantic political reporter Mollly Ball took a close look at our friend and now, since last week, Arkansas Senator-elect Tom Cotton “The making of a conservative superstar.” Ball is a diligent and skilled reporter, but the piece seemed to me a work of almost self-parodic liberal/media hostility. It annoyed me at the time; now I want to look back in cheer. Ball led »

A Night of Schadenfreude In a Minute and a Half

Featured image When things are going badly for the Democrats, many conservatives like to watch MSNBC. The pain of the network’s anchors and personalities is so palpable, so…enjoyable. If, like me, you didn’t tune in to MSNBC on election night–it would take more than schadenfreude to get me to watch Rachel Maddow, Al Sharpton and Chris Matthews–you can enjoy this distillation of MSNBC dismay, prepared by Washington Free Beacon. It takes just »

Liberals Still Not Giving Up on Keystone

Featured image Gail Collins has a column on the Keystone Pipeline in today’s New York Times. It illustrates why so many consider the Times to be the last redoubt of the ignorant. Collins begins by complaining that Republicans, victorious in last week’s election, keep mentioning approval of Keystone as something the new Congress will do. Which is bad because…well, she never says. Republicans talk about Keystone because it is low-hanging fruit, something »

Paging Eugene Robinson

Featured image I expect Eugene Robinson, by far the weakest columnist on the Washington Post op-ed page, is already writing his column about how the American voters acted out a childish temper tantrum at the polls yesterday, like he did in 2010: “According to polls, Americans are in a mood to hold their breath until they turn blue. Voters appear to be so fed up with the Democrats that they’re ready to »

New Ad Takes On Liberal Media

Featured image We wrote here about Conservative War Chest, which has produced some excellent, hard-hitting ads this election cycle. Their latest came out today; it is a frontal assault on liberal media. Spokesman Mike Flynn says: Our new ad shows specific, concrete examples of news executives and partisan reporters trying to hid the truth from the American people. They play such a role trying to influence our elections that they should be »

More on the Obama Administration Scandal That the Washington Press Corps Tried to Bury

Featured image We wrote last night that the story Scott–and no one else–has been reporting for the last week has been confirmed. The computers in the Executive Office of the President have been down for two weeks because they were hacked by a foreign power–the Obama administration now says Russia–and administration technical personnel are having trouble bringing them back on line. This is a huge story, obviously, and it is inconceivable that »

Is the Washington Press Corps Covering Up Another Obama Administration Fiasco? [Updated]

Featured image Last week, we got information from a source in the Executive Office of the President that the EOP’s computer system had been down for, at that time, a week. Federal IT personnel evidently were having trouble identifying and fixing the problem that had brought the computer system down (although email and internet access had been restored), and EOP employees were instructed to say nothing about it. Scott followed up with »

Is Architecture “Racist”?

Featured image For a pure distillation of liberal stupidity, it is hard to beat this article in the Denver Post by the paper’s Fine Arts Critic. Denver’s main train depot, Union Station, has been renovated and restored to its former glory (more or less), which is what troubles the arts critic. The restored building is, he thinks, racist… Our fearless critic began by spending hours at Union Station, classifying visitors by skin »

Another Shining Example of Liberal Open-Mindedness

Featured image Writing about this year’s winner of the Nobel Prize for economics, Frenchman Jean Tirole, the New Yorker’s John Cassidy let’s fly with typical condescension right at the beginning: In general, I’m not a fan of the economics Nobel. Too often, since it was first given, in 1969, it has been used to reward free-market orthodoxy, as evidenced by the plethora of prizes awarded to scholars at the University of Chicago. Apparently »