Media

Meanwhile in Kabul

Featured image Today comes word that the White House blew the cover of the CIA station chief in Kabul by identifying him in a list submitted to Washington Post White House bureau chief Scott Wilson and other reporters covering Obama’s trip to Kabul. Wilson copied the list in the pool report that he disseminated to 6,000 recipients (“including foreign media, not taking part in the trip”) before noting the reference to the »

Koua Fong Lee: The farce continues

Featured image Koua Fong Lee immigrated to the United States from a refugee camp in Thailand in 2004. Three years later Lee killed three Minnesotans when he rammed his 1996 Toyota Camry into the rear of another car at the Snelling Avenue exit of Interstate Highway 94 in St. Paul. Lee’s car careened into the other car somewhere between 70 and 90 miles per hour and Lee was, not unreasonably, convicted of »

Jill Abramson and the road to misery

Featured image In Coconuts, the Marx Brothers’ first movie, the bellhops at Groucho’s Florida hotel demand their wages. Groucho asks them whether they want to be “wage slaves.” When they answer in the negative, Groucho replies: “No, of course not. But what makes wage slaves? Wages!” Wages make slaves out of many of us, and it’s reasonable for low earners to obsess over them. But high earners are a different story. For »

A 1980 campaign you may have missed

Featured image Pitching in to promote the Democrats’ leading theme of this campaign season, the New York Times features Nicholas Confeessore’s page-one story in today’s paper: “Quixotic ’80 campaign gave birth to the Kochs’ powerful network.” Confessore’s story comes out of a deep dive into the Libertarian Party archive at the University of Virginia. Like the Washington Post’s ludicrous Koch/Keystone pratfall, Confessore’s story is derived from the shadow world of well funded »

Why the New York Times Is In Trouble

Featured image The New York Times appointed a task force headed by “Pinch” Sulzberger’s son to analyze the paper’s market position and recommend strategies relating particularly to its digital products. The resulting report was leaked and has gotten a lot of press attention. You can read it here. Most observers have focused on the report’s relatively negative assessment of the Times’s market position; no doubt it is galling to the Times to »

The Koch brothers: What can’t they do?

Featured image At the Wall Street Journal’s Washington Wire Michael Crittenden has compiled “Things Harry Reid has blamed on the Koch brothers.” Crittenden even ventures an explanation: In an attempt to make them the centerpiece of Democrats’ efforts to retain the Senate in November’s midterms, Mr. Reid has regularly used the two billionaires as his go-to bogeymen, referring to Republicans’ “addiction to Koch” (yes, the surname is pronounced Coke) and regularly attacking »

Sharpton versus the Teleprompter

Featured image The Free Beacon has posted a video (below) of the vile Al Sharpton at work on MSNBC. You probably missed all this as it happened. David Rutz explains his handiwork in the video: Behold the greatest battle in television news. It’s not CrossFire or Meet the Press or reruns of Point/CounterPoint. It’s the Rev. Al Sharpton’s war with the teleprompter and, to a greater extent, the English language. Behold as »

The Seven Percent Solution

Featured image Rick Moran alerts us to the survey conducted by Indiana University professors Lars Willnat and David H. Weaver. The survey reveals that “just 7% of journalists identify as Republican. This represents a substantial drop from the survey taken a decade ago, when almost 19% of journalists admitted affiliation to the GOP.” Rick adds these cautionary words to the survey’s reported results: That 7% number is probably inflated by economic and »

In Duranty’s footsteps

Featured image New York Times reporter David Kirkpatrick had some stiff competition for the 2013 Duranty Prize, but Roger Simon reports that he prevailed over runners-up Candy Crowley and John Judis in the ceremony held Monday night in New York. Kirkpatrick was recognized for his supposedly thorough unraveling of the Benghazi affair, “A Deadly Mix in Benghazi.” Roger explains that Kirkpatrick’s account “was revealed almost instantly to be a meretricious piece of »

Approaching metaphysical nullity

Featured image In the category of Pryor Analytics created by our own Steve Hayward, the Washington Post’s David Farenthold enters with a friendly Washington Post profile of Arkansas Senator Mark Pryor as he campaigns for reelection against our friend Tom Cotton. Farenthold’s profile is headlined “Mark Pryor’s challenge: Will Arkansas keep a Democratic senator with no big crusades.” Pryor holds himself out as the kind of politician who doesn’t believe in very »

What’s the matter with David Gregory?

Featured image David Gregory strikes me as the smarmiest liberal of the Sunday gabfests. He seems (to me) not even to know how to pretend to be fair. At least Tim Russert could fake it, as Bob Schieffer does now leading the pack on CBS. Both Gregory and the Meet the Press panel that Gregory hosts drive me nuts. I have therefore taken a small amount of joy in the fall of »

Birth of the VRWC

Featured image Politico draws attention to the release yesterday in the latest tranche of papers from the Clinton library of what it refers to as the conspiracy commerce memo.” The memo appears to be undated; Politico assigns it to 1995, contemporaneous with the Paula Jones sexual harassment lawsuit against Bill Clinton but predating the Lewinsky affair. It was at the outset of the disclosure of the Lewinksy affair that Hillary attributed the »

When Turner was right

Featured image Celebrating the twentieth anniversary of the Turner Classic Movies cable channel earlier this week, I noted that I was a little vague on how Ted Turner came to own the rights to nearly every worthwhile movie ever made. A reader wrote to offer a look back at the ancient history that provides the answer: Back in 1985 I was working as a senior consultant for the entertainment division of a »

When it comes to spying, secrecy and accountability are not mutually exclusive

Featured image Barton Gellman, who led a Washington Post team that revealed NSA surveillance measures, has argued that our interest in “self-government” requires that the public know “the secret policy decisions the government is making for us.” I have responded that our interest in self-government is sufficiently vindicated in cases like spying that require secrecy as long as the political process determines who makes the secret decisions and provides for checks against »

Annals of journalistic self-aggrandizement and congratulation

Featured image The Washington Post has received a Pulitzer public service medal for its role in revealing secrets of the National Security Agency (NSA). It’s natural that journalists and those associated with them wish to celebrate this sort of disclosure. Their interest is in selling newspapers, conferring status on their profession, and influencing public policy (not necessarily in that order). Even assuming that they are also interested in promoting national security, any »

Media Alert and Schedule Change

Featured image I will be on the Bill Bennett radio show tomorrow morning with guest host Mark Davis at 6:30 Central, 7:30 Eastern, talking about the Washington Post/Keystone scandal. If you don’t know where to find Bennett’s Morning In America show on your radio dial, you can listen online here. Also, Fox & Friends has bumped me from tomorrow to Saturday (same topic). So now I am scheduled to be on at »

Media Alert [Updated With Schedule Change]

Featured image UPDATE: Fox & Friends has bumped me from Friday to Saturday at the same time, 6:15 Eastern, 5:15 Central. This one is for early risers: I will be on Fox & Friends tomorrow morning at 6:50 6:15 a.m. Eastern, talking about the Washington Post/Keystone scandal. That’s assuming my alarm goes off. No response yet to my request for documents from the Post. When I have time in the next day »