Media

The Koch brothers: What can’t they do?

Featured image At the Wall Street Journal’s Washington Wire Michael Crittenden has compiled “Things Harry Reid has blamed on the Koch brothers.” Crittenden even ventures an explanation: In an attempt to make them the centerpiece of Democrats’ efforts to retain the Senate in November’s midterms, Mr. Reid has regularly used the two billionaires as his go-to bogeymen, referring to Republicans’ “addiction to Koch” (yes, the surname is pronounced Coke) and regularly attacking »

Sharpton versus the Teleprompter

Featured image The Free Beacon has posted a video (below) of the vile Al Sharpton at work on MSNBC. You probably missed all this as it happened. David Rutz explains his handiwork in the video: Behold the greatest battle in television news. It’s not CrossFire or Meet the Press or reruns of Point/CounterPoint. It’s the Rev. Al Sharpton’s war with the teleprompter and, to a greater extent, the English language. Behold as »

The Seven Percent Solution

Featured image Rick Moran alerts us to the survey conducted by Indiana University professors Lars Willnat and David H. Weaver. The survey reveals that “just 7% of journalists identify as Republican. This represents a substantial drop from the survey taken a decade ago, when almost 19% of journalists admitted affiliation to the GOP.” Rick adds these cautionary words to the survey’s reported results: That 7% number is probably inflated by economic and »

In Duranty’s footsteps

Featured image New York Times reporter David Kirkpatrick had some stiff competition for the 2013 Duranty Prize, but Roger Simon reports that he prevailed over runners-up Candy Crowley and John Judis in the ceremony held Monday night in New York. Kirkpatrick was recognized for his supposedly thorough unraveling of the Benghazi affair, “A Deadly Mix in Benghazi.” Roger explains that Kirkpatrick’s account “was revealed almost instantly to be a meretricious piece of »

Approaching metaphysical nullity

Featured image In the category of Pryor Analytics created by our own Steve Hayward, the Washington Post’s David Farenthold enters with a friendly Washington Post profile of Arkansas Senator Mark Pryor as he campaigns for reelection against our friend Tom Cotton. Farenthold’s profile is headlined “Mark Pryor’s challenge: Will Arkansas keep a Democratic senator with no big crusades.” Pryor holds himself out as the kind of politician who doesn’t believe in very »

What’s the matter with David Gregory?

Featured image David Gregory strikes me as the smarmiest liberal of the Sunday gabfests. He seems (to me) not even to know how to pretend to be fair. At least Tim Russert could fake it, as Bob Schieffer does now leading the pack on CBS. Both Gregory and the Meet the Press panel that Gregory hosts drive me nuts. I have therefore taken a small amount of joy in the fall of »

Birth of the VRWC

Featured image Politico draws attention to the release yesterday in the latest tranche of papers from the Clinton library of what it refers to as the conspiracy commerce memo.” The memo appears to be undated; Politico assigns it to 1995, contemporaneous with the Paula Jones sexual harassment lawsuit against Bill Clinton but predating the Lewinsky affair. It was at the outset of the disclosure of the Lewinksy affair that Hillary attributed the »

When Turner was right

Featured image Celebrating the twentieth anniversary of the Turner Classic Movies cable channel earlier this week, I noted that I was a little vague on how Ted Turner came to own the rights to nearly every worthwhile movie ever made. A reader wrote to offer a look back at the ancient history that provides the answer: Back in 1985 I was working as a senior consultant for the entertainment division of a »

When it comes to spying, secrecy and accountability are not mutually exclusive

Featured image Barton Gellman, who led a Washington Post team that revealed NSA surveillance measures, has argued that our interest in “self-government” requires that the public know “the secret policy decisions the government is making for us.” I have responded that our interest in self-government is sufficiently vindicated in cases like spying that require secrecy as long as the political process determines who makes the secret decisions and provides for checks against »

Annals of journalistic self-aggrandizement and congratulation

Featured image The Washington Post has received a Pulitzer public service medal for its role in revealing secrets of the National Security Agency (NSA). It’s natural that journalists and those associated with them wish to celebrate this sort of disclosure. Their interest is in selling newspapers, conferring status on their profession, and influencing public policy (not necessarily in that order). Even assuming that they are also interested in promoting national security, any »

Media Alert and Schedule Change

Featured image I will be on the Bill Bennett radio show tomorrow morning with guest host Mark Davis at 6:30 Central, 7:30 Eastern, talking about the Washington Post/Keystone scandal. If you don’t know where to find Bennett’s Morning In America show on your radio dial, you can listen online here. Also, Fox & Friends has bumped me from tomorrow to Saturday (same topic). So now I am scheduled to be on at »

Media Alert [Updated With Schedule Change]

Featured image UPDATE: Fox & Friends has bumped me from Friday to Saturday at the same time, 6:15 Eastern, 5:15 Central. This one is for early risers: I will be on Fox & Friends tomorrow morning at 6:50 6:15 a.m. Eastern, talking about the Washington Post/Keystone scandal. That’s assuming my alarm goes off. No response yet to my request for documents from the Post. When I have time in the next day »

And one more thing

Featured image To borrow Brit Hume’s judgment, John Hinderaker has “eviscerated” the posts by Washington Post reporters Steven Mufson and Juliet Eilperin on Koch Industries and the Canadian tar sands. Mufson and Eilperin work full time for the Post. Yet it took both of them to produce the farrago of misinformation and vacuity on display in their two posts. You’d think one of them could have handled it all by himself (or »

Culture of corruption update

Featured image Yesterday in “Culture of corruption” I wrote about the “sting operation over three years that captured leading Philadelphia Democrats, including four members of the city’s state House delegation, on tape accepting money[.]” The investigation was killed by Attorney General Kathleen Kane (a Democrat) when she took office in early 2013. Kane has hired an attorney to make threatening noises regarding a defamation lawsuit against the Inquirer, but she is firing »

Media Alert

Featured image I will be on the Bill Bennett radio show tomorrow morning at the ungodly hour of 5:30 (or a few minutes after) Central time, 6:30 Eastern time. We will be talking about the Democratic Party’s smear campaign against Paul Ryan. If you don’t know where to find Morning In America on your radio dial, you can listen here. »

From kvell to kvetch

Featured image In her New York Times column “Dems in distress” — at the top of the RealClearPolitics honor roll this morning — Maureen Dowd originally observed that Democrats were “kvelling” (dammit, don’t spellcheck me, bro) about President Obama. “Kvelling” is Yiddish for “taking pride in”; Dowd meant that Democrats are “kvetching” about Obama. Dowd’s error went undetected by the Times’s layers of editors and fact checkers. I cut them slack. It’s »

Maureen Dowd finds the lightning bug

Featured image Mark Twain famously observed: “The difference between the almost right word & the right word is really a large matter–it’s the difference between the lightning bug and the lightning.” Maureen Dowd presents as tomorrow’s Exhibit A. She happened onto the lightning bug in her New York Times column “Dems in distress.” Referring to the Democrats’ current panic as a crisis of confidence in President Obama, Dowd writes: “It’s not just »