Paul Ryan

House leadership postpones vote on large-scale amnesty bill [UPDATED]

Featured image The House was expected to vote today on two immigration bills: Rep. Goodlatte’s proposal and the House leadership’s alleged compromise bill supported by President Trump. Goodlatte’s bill grants amnesty (but not path to citizenship) to the DACA population in exchange for significantly tightening up immigration enforcement and prompt, deep cuts to chain migration categories. Jessica Vaughn of the Center of Immigration Studies estimates that this bill would result in a »

Trump stands tall against bad amnesty legislation (update: he changed his mind)

Featured image Last night, I discussed the two amnesty-style immigration reform proposals kicking around in the House. One of them, Rep. Goodlatte’s proposal, is in my view a reasonable compromise. It offers amnesty for the DACA population only, in exchange for strong measures to control future illegal immigration and significant limits on some forms of immigration that are currently legal. The other proposal, backed by Speaker Ryan and known as “the compromise,” »

Leftist House Chaplain keeps job, as Ryan backs down

Featured image When Speaker Paul Ryan fired Rev. Patrick Conway from his job as Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives, critics of the decision argued that Ryan made the decision because Conway is Catholic. Conway himself reportedly took that position in a complaint against the Speaker’s office. The claim is absurd. Ryan himself is Catholic. A more plausible charge is that Ryan fired Conway because of his theology. Conway is a »

Paul Ryan and beyond

Featured image Speaker Paul Ryan will be stepping down. He will not seek re-election to the House. I like and admire Ryan, but believe he’s been a disappointment as Speaker. His signature issue was always entitlement reform/fiscal responsibility. Ryan was never likely to get entitlement reform. However, he might at least have avoided the gross fiscal irresponsibility of the omnibus bill that Congress recently passed and the president signed. Alternatively, and preferably, »

Senate may be perilously close to passing liberal amnesty legislation

Featured image Until today, there were two main immigration reform proposals in the Senate. The first: a proposal by Sen. Grassley, and supported by the White House, to grant amnesty to nearly two million “Dreamers” while (a) allocating $25 billion for a wall and other security measures, (b) cutting way back on chain migration, and (c) ending the diversity lottery. The second: a proposal by Sens. Coons and McCain that would grant »

Did the GOP really win the shutdown showdown?

Featured image My initial reaction to the deal that ended the partial government shutdown was that Chuck Schumer caved and that the deal was a big win for Republicans. That’s the conventional view shared by, to name just a few, Brit Hume, Marc Thiessen, and Ben Shapiro . However, I’m no longer sure this was a true victory for Republicans, at least those of the conservative variety. The Democrats may have received »

The Obamacare replacement blame game

Featured image From the Washington Post: President Trump cast blame Sunday for the collapse of his effort to overhaul the health-care system on conservative interest groups and far-right Republican lawmakers, shifting culpability to his own party after initially faulting Democratic intransigence. His attack — starting with a tweet that singled out the House Freedom Caucus as well as the influential Club for Growth and Heritage Action for America — marked a new »

Ryan ready to alter repeal plan, but in which direction?

Featured image Speaker Paul Ryan acknowledged today that his health-care proposal must change to pass the House, and said he is prepared to change it. As the Washington Post points out, this seems like a departure from Ryan’s earlier position that his proposal presented lawmakers with a “binary choice” and could not be altered significantly. According to the Post, Ryan did not say what changes to his plan are under consideration. Nor »

The limits of Speaker Ryan’s high-mindedness

Featured image Yesterday’s CBO report on the House GOP Obamacare replacement plan caused me to wonder: What kind of a political party front-loads reform legislation with pain — in this case, higher premiums — and backloads it with benefits — here, lower premiums and budgetary savings? The answer is, a political party led by Paul Ryan. The Speaker believes in legislating to fix problems in the long-term and, while waiting for the »

The parliamentarian dodge

Featured image I wrote here about how congressional Republicans are subscribing to the view that key parts of Obamacare cannot be repealed through “reconciliation” — i.e., without 60 votes. This view holds that the GOP cannot repeal the price-hiking, competition-destroying regulations that form the core of Obamacare because the parliamentarian, pursuant to the Byrd Rule, won’t allow such repeal through the budget reconciliation process. I took issue with that view. First, the »

Speaker Ryan vastly overstates his case

Featured image Speaker Paul Ryan says his proposal to repeal and replace Obamacare is “what good conservative healthcare reform looks like.” He adds: It repeals Obamacare’s taxes; it repeals Obamacare’s spending; it repeals Obamacare’s mandates. It creates a vibrant market where insurance companies compete for your business. Where you have lower costs, more choices, and greater control over your healthcare. And it returns power—this is most important—this returns power from Washington back »

The future of Paul Ryan’s speakership

Featured image The Washington Post claims that Speaker Paul Ryan “is on the verge of a reckoning with House conservatives that threatens to end his speakership and extinguish his future as a national political leader.” Post reporters Kelsey Snell and Mike DeBonis say that, given the likelihood of an enhanced presence of Democrats in the new House, it might take less than one-third of the 40-member House Freedom Caucus to end Ryan’s »

The Trump-Ryan fight is a good thing

Featured image Ever since Speaker Ryan declined to appear with Donald Trump after the Billy Bush tape became public, Trump has been attacking Ryan. His latest claim is that Ryan has backed away from Trump in order to facilitate a 2020 presidential bid. The claim is absurd. Ryan backed Trump for months when it looked like Trump might win. Now that it’s almost certain Trump won’t win, Ryan doesn’t improve his presidential »

Escapism anyone? A look at 2020

Featured image Assuming that Donald Trump loses this year’s presidential race, who is likely to be the GOP nominee in 2020? The FiveThirtyEight crew takes a stab at this question (as well as the Democrats’ side of the equation). The discussion is too snarky and anti-Republican for my taste, but worthwhile nonetheless. Here (in no special order) are the six Republicans I consider most likely to be the nominee in four year: »

Paul Ryan easily wins his primary

Featured image Speaker Paul Ryan crushed his Republican primary opponent Paul Nehlenn today. Ryan received around 85 percent of the vote, according to Politico. Ryan, of course, had all the advantages. His opponent was an unknown whom Ryan (gutlessly, it seems to me) refused to debate. In addition, Ryan was able to pour more than $600,000 into television advertising in the past month. He even obtained Donald Trump’s endorsement in the end. »

George Will’s unfair attack on Paul Ryan [UPDATED]

Featured image George Will has lashed out at Speaker Paul Ryan for endorsing Donald Trump. Ryan says he endorsed Trump because he thinks a Trump presidency would be better for Ryan’s House policy agenda than would a Clinton presidency. Ryan is almost certainly right about this. However, Will finds it insufficient reason for Ryan to support Trump. He dismisses Ryan’s thinking this way: In Robert Bolt’s play “A Man for All Seasons,” »

Paul Ryan is wrong about Trump’s attack on the judge

Featured image Speaker Paul Ryan said today that Donald Trump’s attacks on Judge Gonzalo Curiel constituted “the textbook definition of a racist comment.” Ryan made this comment in the Anacostia neighborhood of Southeast Washington, D.C. Ryan thus had two reasons to label Trump’s remark “racist.” By doing so, he could pander to his African-American audience and position himself, in the event Trump loses, to say he called Trump out. But Ryan is »