Race and racial bias

The fire this time (5)

Featured image In the first week of its publication Ta-Nehisi Coates’s Between the World and Me entered the New York Times nonfiction best seller list at number 1. The book is dreadful, but Coates knows his audience and he has hit it with this book. I think conservatives would be well advised to pay attention. In this series I have tried to give conservatives unlikely to read the book a rounded picture »

The fire this time (4)

Featured image According to Ta-Nehisi Coates in Between the World and Me, his widely acclaimed new book, “The problem with the police is not that they are fascist pigs but that our country is ruled by majoritarian pigs.” Later he decries “the horror of our prison system” and “the long war against the black body[.]” “Here is what I would like for you to know,” Coates confides to his son. “In America »

The fire this time (3)

Featured image Ta-Nehisi Coates opens the second section of Between the World and Me with the death of Prince Jones, his fellow student at Howard University. Jones was killed on September 1, 2000, in Fairfax County (Virginia) by a Prince George’s County (Maryland) police officer (coincidentally named Carlton Jones) working undercover. Jones was 25 at the time. A Washington Post account of the incident fills in a few of the sorry details: »

The fire this time (2)

Featured image When I started writing about Ta-Nehisi Coates’s hot new book Between the World and Me earlier this week (here and here), I did so because Coates is an influential public intellectual and the book has been the subject of universal acclaim. Today NR editor Rich Lowry dissents in his excellent column “The toxic worldview of Ta-Nehisi Coates.” Rich’s column makes an important contribution. I urge interested readers to check it »

The fire this time (1)

Featured image I wrote yesterday about the cultural phenomenon of Ta-Nehesi Coates and his hot new book Between the World and Me, published last week under an imprint of Random House. I want to explore the book in a series of (mostly brief, I hope) posts, of which this is the introduction. I need a series to explore the book in all its awfulness. I am afraid that this is important because »

This year’s model

Featured image Certification as the liberals’ official angry black man is a lucrative gig. The market is upscale, but the job is only temporary. Fashions change, or rather remain subject to a cycle. The job isn’t easy; it requires high attainment in the art of performance. Black rage must be precisely matched to liberal guilt. James Baldwin provides the original model, in the essays originally published in the New Yorker and then »

Dolezal Doubles Down on Crazy

Featured image I thought we had pretty much covered the entire waterfront on the Rachel Dolezal fraud last month, but who knew that she’d show up for an encore, granting an interview to a clearly skeptical (but in this case how appropriately named) Vanity Fair magazine. VF writer Allison Samuels clearly doesn’t have much sympathy for Dolezal’s presumptions, and lets Dolezal double down with her delusions: There have been women over the »

Meet the new Jim Crow, same as the old BS

Featured image This week President Obama commuted the sentences of “46 non-violent drug offenders.” In commuting these sentences, Obama is doing his thing to lead and otherwise contribute to the race-based assault on law enforcement. As I noted a while back, if you want to get a handle on this particular assault, you must acquaint yourself with Michelle Alexander and The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness.. Published »

Liberals Should be Careful What They Wish For

Featured image We have written extensively about the Obama administration’s war on the suburbs, an important part of its project of “fundamentally transforming” America. Investors Business Daily writes: Under a sweeping new federal housing mandate, the Obama administration threatens to withhold funding for cities and counties that fail to remove local zoning laws and other potentially “discriminatory barriers” that restrict low-income housing in wealthy neighborhoods. More than 1,200 municipalities will be impacted »

Perry Sense

Featured image While Donald Trump continues to get disproportionate attention for his correctly grounded—if not well formulated—attacks on out of control immigration, Texas Gov. Rick Perry is quietly emerging as a much more serious candidate. Worth catching the excerpts of his remarks on race and economic opportunity that he delivered at the National Press Club last Thursday. The Wall Street Journal editorializes on it today: [Perry’s] remarks are far more than a »

Marilyn Mosby Goes Vogue

Featured image We have been watching, with a skeptical eye, the doings of Marilyn Mosby, the Baltimore States Attorney. Young, inexperienced and politically ambitious, Mosby may have sown the seeds of an unsuccessful–or worse, unjust–criminal prosecution by overcharging six police officers who were involved in the arrest of Freddie Gray. On the other hand, Ms. Mosby is undeniably attractive, a quality that could take her far. Mosby is the subject of an »

In housing case, Justice Kennedy’s eyes are wide shut

Featured image I wrote here about yesterday’s decision by the Supreme Court in Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project. By a 5-4 vote, with Justice Kennedy writing for the majority, the Court held that the Fair Housing Act allows lawsuits based on disparate impact. Usually in a case like this, it is the dissent that warns of the dire consequences that may well flow from the »

Another Racist To Be Evicted From American History: Woodrow Wilson

Featured image If our public life is going to be all race all the time, with a view toward expunging all traces of racists from honored positions in American history, then Woodrow Wilson is a prime candidate for the memory hole. At InstaPundit, Randy Barnett sets out Wilson’s record as a racist in detail. Wilson re-segregated federal agencies that had been integrated during Reconstruction. W.E.B. DuBois called Wilson’s segregationist and discriminatory policies »

Supreme Court finds disparate impact claims cognizable in housing cases

Featured image The Supreme Court has just affirmed the Fifth Circuit’s ruling that the Fair Housing Act allows lawsuits based on disparate impact – that is, an allegation that a law or practice has a discriminatory effect, even if it wasn’t based on a discriminatory purpose. The case is Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project. The vote was 5-4. Justice Kennedy wrote the opinion. Without reading »

The Democrats Get Their Crazy On

Featured image The floodgates are open, and craziness is pouring out. The Democrats’ Confederate flag victory has them lusting for more. Hillary Clinton says South Carolina is only the beginning: “It shouldn’t fly there. It shouldn’t fly anywhere,” Mrs. Clinton said of South Carolina…. In her discussion Tuesday with community leaders at Christ the King United Church of Christ in Florissant, Mo., Mrs. Clinton said the flag’s removal would be “just the »

Hillary relies on Republicans to be a party of cowards

Featured image Hillary Clinton has made “voting rights” the centerpiece of her presidential campaign. Christian Adams reports: In Houston, Hillary made election process rules a focus of her campaign. By process, I mean who votes, when they vote, and how they vote. While Republicans tend to focus on issues, Democrats realize that if they dominate the process of the election, the power to control the issues will follow. Process brings power. Hillary’s »

Obama expounds on racism, superficially

Featured image President Obama said yesterday that “we are not cured of [racism].” He also said that “the legacy of slavery, Jim Crow, discrimination in almost every institution of our lives. . .casts a long shadow and that’s still part of our DNA that’s passed on.” Let’s consider these assertions. The second consists of cliched metaphors (“casts a long shadow” and “part of our DNA”). As such, they are difficult to evaluate. »