Race and racial bias

Richie Incognito, honorary black man?

Featured image The National Football League has a new scandal on its hands. This one involves the harassment of Miami Dolphins tackle Jonathan Martin by line mate Richie Incognito. The full nature and scope of this harassment isn’t clear, but apparently there is no dispute that, at a minimum, Incognito left Martin a voice mail calling him a “half ni____ piece of sh__” and threatening to inflict physical harm on the player »

Merseysiders send England to Brazil, racial controversy ensues

Featured image England advanced to the 2014 World Cup (to be played in Brazil) by defeating Poland 2-0 on Tuesday. Both goals were made on Merseyside. Wayne Rooney — Liverpool born, Everton bred — scored the first. No surprise there. He has averaged about a goal per game that he’s been healthy enough to play in during World Cup qualification. The way Rooney scored was a little surprising though. The goal came »

Mayors: Making and unmaking

Featured image William F. Buckley’s The Unmaking of a Mayor is less a manifesto or memoir than a (prescient) work of media criticism, yet I’ve been thinking about it in the context of the current New York mayoral campaign. What would Buckley have said about Anthony Weiner and the rest of that motley crew (or Mötley Crüe, for that matter)? The field of Democratic candidates might even have taxed the powers of »

This week in college football history

Featured image On September 10, 1963, Darryl Hill, a wide receiver for the University of Maryland, became the first African-American to play football in the Atlantic Coast Conference, thus beginning the process of integrating big-time college football in the South. Hill’s debut came at College Park against North Carolina State. Thom Loverro, in the Washington Times, recalls this landmark event and the larger story around it. Hill played freshman football for the »

Mayors Pledge to Fight 21st Century “Racism”

Featured image The U.S. Conference of Mayors is meeting in Birmingham, Alabama, and some of the mayors have used the occasion to pledge a renewed effort to combat “racism.” Reuters reports: From lunch counters to public buses, the battle over racism in the United States during the 1950s and 60s took place in cities, and five decades later mayors of some of the country’s largest urban areas have vowed to carry on »

Annals of the war on standards

Featured image I have written from time to time about the “war on standards” being waged by the modern civil rights movement — an attempt to bulldoze standards of conduct and achievement that stand in the way of equal distribution of society’s benefits and prizes to Blacks. Examples of such standards include, but are not limited to, (1) certain employment criteria — e.g., tests and criminal background checks — (2) some criminal »

Washington Post calls out Obama/Holder for suing to block school choice

Featured image The Washington Post’s editors have ripped the Obama administration for petitioning a federal court to bar Louisiana from awarding vouchers for the 2014-15 school year to students in public school systems that are under federal desegregation orders, unless the vouchers are first approved by a federal judge. John wrote about this disgraceful suit here. The Post notes that “9 of 10 Louisiana children who receive vouchers to attend private schools »

Were the 1960s race riots “self-defeating”?

Featured image In his speech commemorating the great civil rights march of 1963, President Obama asserted that “the anguish of assassinations set off self-defeating riots.” However, as I argued here, serious black rioting preceded the assassination of Martin Luther King and was not connected with any other assassination. There’s another dubious claim in Obama’s account: it’s questionable whether the black rioting of the 1960s was self-defeating. In 1967, almost a year before »

Is Martin Luther King Jr.’s Dream Unconstitutional?

Featured image Disregarding race is the new “racism”: that is the position of the modern Left. Which raises the question: is it unconstitutional for American governments to treat members of all races equally? If you think that is an absurd question, you haven’t been paying attention. Via InstaPundit, this observation from Nick Rosenkranz at the Volokh Conspiracy: Fifty years ago today, Martin Luther King, Jr., spoke these immortal words: “I have a »

What “The Butler” Gets Wrong

Featured image Answer: Just about everything.  At least when it comes to Reagan. I’ve been closeted away all day putting the final touches on a large public lecture I’m delivering tonight at 7 pm at the university, on the subject of why there are so few conservatives in higher education, and I’ll post some excerpts here tomorrow. But for the last several days I’ve been working with Kiron Skinner, Paul Kengor, and »

Obama gets his black history wrong

Featured image As John has noted, President Obama’s speech today at a rally commemorating the great civil rights march of 1963 was, not surprisingly, an exercise in partisan demagoguery. Even when Obama tried to “honest,” he didn’t quite get it right: And then, if we’re honest with ourselves, we’ll admit that during the course of 50 years, there were times when some of us claiming to push for change lost our way. »

Did Something Happen on the Mall Today? (Yawn)

Featured image Fifty years ago was the historic civil rights march on Washington, which was highlighted by Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech–the most memorable parts of which apparently were ad libbed. Paul has written memorably about attending that march as a boy; if you want to be reminded of why it was an important event, read his post. Today the Democratic Party staged a 50-year anniversary event on the »

Remembering the great civil rights march of 1963

Featured image Participating in the great civil rights march of 1963 didn’t exactly change my life. But it made my course more fixed, helping inspire me to become a lawyer and, in my first job as such, to work for the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. That’s why I’ve written about the march on August 28 of almost every year I’ve blogged. Today, on the 50th anniversary of the march, I thought »

Teasing racism out of Miley Cyrus’ tease

Featured image A professor called Pepper Schwartz, in a “special to CNN,” advises that “Miley Cyrus is sexual — get over it.” I have. It wasn’t difficult. I knew nothing about Miley Cyrus until her lewd performance caused a fuss. And I’ve know about our debauched culture for a long time. But not so fast, says this black feminist. It turns out that Cyrus’ performance was a racist “commodification of black female »

Eric Holder Sues to Block Louisiana School Choice

Featured image In a sane world, this would be a scandal: Obama’s Department of Justice has sued to block poor African-Americans (and others) from escaping failing schools in Louisiana and trying, at least, to get a decent education: The Justice Department is trying to stop a school vouchers program in Louisiana that attempts to help families send their children to independent schools instead of under-performing public schools. The agency wants to stop »

If Barack Obama Had a Son, Would He Look Like Chris Lane? [Updated]

Featured image Chris Lane is the Australian college student and baseball player who was murdered while jogging along a street in Duncan, Oklahoma. The perpetrators were three teenagers who were bored and decided to murder someone just for fun. They saw Lane running by, got in a car, drove behind him and shot him in the back. Two of the bored teenagers, Chancey Luna and James Edwards, have been charged with first »

President Obama and the war on school discipline

Featured image Last night, I wrote about the civil rights movement’s epically misguided war against school disciplinary standards. Not surprisingly, as Mike McDaniel (a high school teacher) has shown, the Obama administration stands shoulder-to-shoulder with its base in this battle. Eric Holder expressed his commitment to the cause in 2012, when he said: We’ve often seen that students of color, students from disadvantaged backgrounds, and students with special needs are disproportionately likely »