Race and racial bias

Is There Any Hope For Our Civilization?

Featured image I am an inveterate optimist, but the more I learn about what goes on in our universities, the more I conclude that our civilization has a death wish. Heather Mac Donald’s article in City Journal on “micro-aggression” at UCLA prompted this particular bout of despondency. What goes on in our universities is scarcely believable. Mac Donald’s article is lengthy and should be read in its entirety, but here are a »

In Re: Bill Cosby

Featured image Having been a Bill Cosby fan since I first heard the punch line, “Noah—how long can you tread water?” as a kid, the charges piling up against him are sickening. Whether or not they can be proven beyond a reasonable doubt, his career appears to be over and his reputation will be forever in disgrace.. Equally sickening is how the left is already exploiting Cosby’s downfall as a means of »

Eric Holder and Loretta Lynch — is there a meaningful difference?

Featured image The nomination of Loretta Lynch for Attorney General elicited praise from many familiar with her work as a prosecutor. From some conservatives, it brought relief that President Obama hadn’t nominated Tom Perez. And nearly everyone is relieved that Eric Holder will depart. But there was a time when Holder received the same kind of praise Lynch is getting now. Indeed, he was something of a golden boy during his time »

Racism Institutionalized in Minneapolis Public Schools

Featured image This probably shouldn’t be surprising, but still… Minneapolis public school officials are making dramatic changes to their discipline practices by requiring the superintendent’s office to review all suspensions of students of color. The change comes amid intensifying scrutiny of the way Minneapolis public schools treat minority students and in the wake of new data showing black students are 10 times more likely to be sent home than white students. Superintendent »

Black Ohio Democrat denounces “plantation-style management” by his state party

Featured image Democrat John Barnes, a member of the Ohio state legislature, has pulled back the curtain on the racial politics that pervade his party. Barnes, who is African-American, alleges in a lawsuit against the Ohio Democratic Party and its outgoing chairman Chris Redfern that he faced discrimination, retaliation, and defamation at the hands of his own party for refusing to join the Ohio Legislative Black Caucus and for raising the issue »

Sharpton’s shape: An update

Featured image We’ve written repeatedly about the disgraceful role played by Al Sharpton as a power broker and arbiter of racial affairs in the Democratic Party, most recently in “Sharpton’s shape.” In yesterday’s Wall Street Journal, Heather Mac Donald illuminated the phenomenon in The Democratic embrace of Al Sharpton” (behind the Journal’s subscription paywall, but accessible via Google here). It is a valuable contribution to the discussion. Indeed, it is valuable in »

About Ferguson, the Post Says: Oops, Never Mind

Featured image Yesterday the Washington Post reported on leaks from the grand jury investigating the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, as well as recently-released autopsy results. The bottom line is that the evidence, including both eyewitness testimony and physical evidence, supports the conclusion that officer Darren Wilson acted in self-defense: Ferguson, Mo., police officer Darren Wilson and Michael Brown fought for control of the officer’s gun, and Wilson fatally shot »

Holder DOJ expert witness: blacks are dumber and less civic-minded than whites

Featured image An expert witness hired by Eric Holder’s Department of Justice testified that North Carolina election law requirements have an adverse impact on black voters because they are less “sophisticated” than white voters and therefore have more difficulty figuring out how to register to vote. Christian Adams has the details. The requirements that the DOJ’s witness found blacks less able than whites to comply with are (1) registering to vote before »

The Democrats Go Back to Their Racist Roots [Updated]

Featured image Faced with major electoral losses this year, the Democratic Party is pulling out all the stops. For them, that means descending, again, into racism. As Glenn Reynolds says: Democrats used to use racial fearmongering to get white voters to turn out. Now they use racial fearmongering to get black voters to turn out. Not much else has changed…. The Democratic Party is trying to use the shooting of Michael Brown »

New dimensions in racial tensions

Featured image A cafeteria food fight turned into a riot at South High School in Minneapolis in February last year. The school’s security officers were insufficient to the task. Police officers dispatched to the scene sprayed mace and placed the school on lockdown to get a handle on the situation. Three or four students and a staff member ended up in the hospital. What was all the excitement about? The Star Tribune »

For our D.C. area readers, a workshop on “disparate impact”

Featured image “Disparate impact” theory is the left’s most potent weapon in the war on standards. Activists use the theory to attack, say, school disciplinary standards or the use of employment tests or standards on the theory that these policies disproportionately burden blacks. Typically, the remedy they seek is the discarding or relaxation of the standard. As I observed here, the real goal of this campaign is to impose a de facto »

Protesters Disrupt St. Louis Symphony Performance

Featured image Saturday night, a self-proclaimed “flash mob” of Michael Brown protesters disrupted a performance of the St. Louis Symphony. They stood up, unfurled signs and started singing as the orchestra was about to perform Brahms’ Requiem. This is what it looked like: The demonstrators got, I thought, a surprisingly polite–and even, from some concert-goers and members of the orchestra, warm–reception. In my opinion, this kind of thing is not to be »

Holder to leave, but his stain will linger

Featured image There have been worse members of presidential cabinets than Eric Holder. John B. Floyd and Howell Cobb, both of James Buchanan’s cabinet, who apparently aided the South in the days before secession come to mind. In my 40 plus years of observing presidencies, though, Holder has a strong claim on first place. His warped attempts to use the national law enforcement apparatus to remake America along leftist lines would have »

Will the Obama EEOC sue the NFL over its new domestic violence policy?

Featured image The answer, of course, is no. If anything, the Obama administration seems to be pushing the NFL to prevent young black men who have been convicted of no crime from earning a living. But my question isn’t frivolous, given the EEOC’s litigation policy towards employers that deny employment opportunities to blacks who get into trouble with the law. Indeed, the EEOC has no tolerance at all for employers who exclude »

The Lessons of Rotherham

Featured image A week or more has gone by, and we haven’t written about the Rotherham rape scandal that has rocked Great Britain. Rotherham is a city of around 250,000 in Yorkshire, where at least 1,400 girls were raped, and in many instances prostituted, by gangs consisting mostly or entirely of Pakistani men. It seems to be generally acknowledged that the local authorities had a good idea what was going on, but »

Democrats: Still Seeking the Bottom of the Low Road

Featured image Fred Barnes notes in The Weekly Standard that “Democrats Take the Low Road” in their desperation to keep their Senate majority. Ratifying that judgment is the New York Times, which includes a story today entitled “At Risk in Senate, Democrats Seek to Rally Blacks.” The subhed is even more revealing: “Move to Channel Anger.” (Note: this subhed doesn’t appear on the online version of the story; it’s just in the »

Ninth Circuit considers Guam’s racially discriminatory plebiscite registraton law

Featured image The United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit heard oral argument yesterday in the case of Davis v. Guam. The hearing occurred in Guam, the first time the Ninth Circuit has sat there since 2002. Mr. Davis, a resident of Guam, attempted to register to vote in a plebiscite on Guam’s relationship to the United States. He was denied permission to register because he could not trace his »