Race and racial bias

A word from Jason Riley

Featured image The Wall Street Journal’s Jason Riley appeared on the panel of Special Report with Bret Baier last night (video below). He commented on President Obama’s statement on Ferguson (and Iraq) earlier in the day. I can’t find a complete transcript at the White House site; the Washginton Post quotes it in relevant part here. It was a statement full of the reigning leftist clichés, even retrieving the “anger” of “looting” »

Between law enforcement and looters, Obama is, as usual, neutral

Featured image President Obama said today that he will not visit Ferguson, Missouri so as not to “put[] my thumb on the scale” in the investigation into the killing of Michael Brown. We should be grateful that he’s staying put. Yet, short of following the investigators around, it’s not clear why Obama being in Missouri would put his thumb on the scale of the investigation. It’s his comments, not his physical presence, »

Thoughts on the Ritual Now Taking Place in Ferguson, Missouri

Featured image Eight days ago, a Ferguson, Missouri police officer named Darren Wilson shot and killed Michael Brown, a young but very large (6′ 4″, 300 pounds) African-American, under circumstances that remain murky. Since then, a ritual with which we have become tiresomely familiar has unfolded: demonstrations that turned into riots, Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson–still!–descending on the scene, pleas for peace, intervention of federal authorities, calls for reappraisal of American race »

Liberal policing and the thugs’ veto

Featured image On Thursday, President Obama interrupted his vacation to address reporters regarding the situation in Northern Iraq and the situation in Ferguson, Missouri. As to the latter, Obama said, in essence, that the liberals had taken charge. Governor Jay Nixon (“a good man,” Obama assured us) was now fully engaged, and Eric Holder was also on the case. In addition, the Missouri Highway Patrol had supplanted the yokels in the local »

When Shot, Michael Brown Had Just Committed a Robbery

Featured image A major development today in the Michael Brown case: the Ferguson Police Department has released files, including surveillance video stills, indicating that Michael Brown and his companion, Dorian Johnson, had robbed a convenience store just ten minutes before Brown’s altercation with officer Darren Wilson. Brown and his friend stole a box of cigars worth around $50, and Brown assaulted a store clerk. Officer Wilson presumably was following up on the »

Opportunism knocks in Missouri

Featured image Add Rand Paul’s name to the list of opportunists seeking to exploit for political purposes the tragic shooting of young Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. The race-hustlers populate the list, of course. So does President Obama, who sees a topic in his supposed wheelhouse (but in reality a local matter) through which he can distract attention from his disastrous foreign policy. Writing in Time Magazine, Paul sees the opportunity to »

It’s Not Easy Being White!

Featured image Americans of Middle Eastern and North African descent, sometimes abbreviated as “MENA,” have a problem: they are white. In today’s world, that is a bad thing, as Pew explains: [F]or the census, since the beginning of the last century, the MENA community has been lumped into the “white” category. Back in 1909, such a designation made a lot of sense, but today, members of the MENA community are lobbying the »

Who’s Calling My Neighborhood “Sketchy”?

Featured image This is a follow-up to Steve’s post titled It’s White People All the Way Down. That post was about a new app that helps users avoid “sketchy” neighborhoods. Sure enough, as Steve reported, the app was promptly denounced as racist by Gawker (“…SketchFactor, a racist app made for avoiding ‘sketchy’ neighborhoods, which is the term young white people use to describe places where they don’t feel safe because they watched »

It’s White People All The Way Down

Featured image Liberalism has been on a hair-trigger for several decades now about “blaming the victim” for any misfortune or ill-circumstance that they may be suffering—sometimes with good reason, but often not.  The irony is that liberals never seem to notice their symmetrical sin of blaming everything on racism, the “System,” the class structure of oppression, the Judean People’s Front, etc.  Like the apocryphal story of Bertrand Russell and turtles, for the »

Would the civil rights act of 1964 pass Congress today?

Featured image Today marks the 50th anniversary of the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. It passed Congress over the strenuous opposition, and indeed filibuster, of Southern Democrats. At Politico, Todd Purdum seizes on the occasion to argue that this landmark legislation could not pass Congress today. This is mainly true, he asserts, because “sometime in the 1980s” the Barry Goldwater wing of the Republican Party seized control causing the »

Hillary “disrespects” Obama

Featured image One of the assertions made on the robo calls to black voters in Mississippi on behalf of Sen. Thad Cochran was that the Tea Party, whose favored candidate Chris McDaniel was Cochran’s opponent, has engaged in “disrespectful treatment of the country’s first African-American president.” This is an oft-expressed complaint among certain blacks. Sure, America elected a black president. But, the complaint goes, the lily-white Tea Party has disrespected him to »

Thoughts from the ammo line

Featured image Our friend Ammo Grrrll ends the working week with a bang. She takes a look at the invasion occurring on our southern border and declares: “HALLELUJAH, IT’S OBVIOUSLY THE END OF RACISM!!” She writes: Many years ago, Albert Brooks wrote and starred in the wonderful movie Lost in America. Briefly, a highly-paid ad executive and his ditzy wife chuck the high life to go on a quest to discover America »

Trademark Infringement

Featured image Apparently there is a statute that gives the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office the legal authority to revoke a trademark it deems to be ”immoral” “scandalous” or “disparaging,” and the Constitution explicitly grants Congress the power to regulate copyrights and patents (Article I, Section 8, clause 8), so the federal government’s revocation of the Washington Redskins name appears legal on the surface, though I can imagine a number of avenues for »

Smearing Scott Walker

Featured image The Democrats must think Scott Walker poses a serious threat in 2016. Ann Althouse just got the latest issue of The New Republic on her iPad, and you have to see it to believe it. Here is the cover. If it is hard to read, the line across the bottom says, “Too bad he owes his success to a toxic strain of racial politics.” The New Republic article is titled, »

Reparations? Seriously?

Featured image For some reason, talk of reparations is in the air. I haven’t seen any concrete proposals, but on Twitter, lots of people are debating whether African-Americans should be paid money to compensate them (or, more logically, their ancestors–but it’s a little late) for slavery. Steve even wrote a half-serious post on the subject yesterday. At Ricochet, Jason Rudert argues that “The Time for Reparations Is Now.” Rudert writes: The window »

Reparations? Perhaps—But Democrats Should Pay Them [with comment by Paul]

Featured image The idea of paying reparations for slavery is back in the news, courtesy of a rambling article by Ta-Nehisi Coates at The Atlantic that generated a lot of attention. The idea has lots and lots of large practical problems, though is not on its face ridiculous.  (I’m not the only conservative who thinks this: see Seth Mandel at Commentary.com.)  The labor of generations of slaves was stolen by force, which »

A footnote on Brown

Featured image The principle of equal treatment without regard to race is one that is close to my heart. Accordingly, one of my favorite books on a legal subject is Andrew Kull’s history The Color-Blind Constitution, a book I learned of at the time of its publication through Judge Alex Kosinski’s 1993 New Republic review/essay. Professor Kull devotes two chapters to the separate but equal doctrine approved by the Supreme Court in »