Republicans

Notes on Cantormageddon

Featured image Only last week in a local Richmond television interview, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor addressed immigration reform as follows: “I have told the president, there are some things we can work on together. We can work on the border security bill together, we can work on something like the kids.” This while the southwest United States is under invasion by an overwhelming wave of “kids” who have gotten the message. »

Mississippi’s Republican brawl too close to call [UPDATED -- runoff coming]

Featured image This is another primary day in the 2014 cycle. The most interesting race is the Republican Senate primary in Mississippi between longtime Senator Thad Cochran and state Sen. Chris McDaniel, the Tea Party’s favorite in the race. I don’t believe we have written about this contest and, frankly, I have averted my eyes. It has been that distasteful. I’ve always thought, however, that Mississippi could do with a more conservative »

Reform conservatism: Do conservatives want it?

Featured image The YG Network has produced a manifesto for reform conservatism, the movement spearheaded by leading conservative thinkers who want to enact innovative programs that will assist the middle class while adhering to principles of limited government. The book — Room to Grow — features chapters by Power Line favorites Peter Wehner, Yuval Levin, Ramesh Ponnuru, James Capretta (on health care), James Pethokoukis (financial and regulatory reform) and others. I look »

In other primary news

Featured image Monica Wehby, a pediatric neurosurgeon, has won the Oregon Senate primary and will face incumbent Democrat Jeff Merkley. Wehby defeated state Rep. Jason Conger by a margin of 51-37. Such polling as exists suggests that Wehby has a shot at defeating her non-descript opponent. However, Wehby, a divorced mother, has come under fire for her involvement in two domestic disputes. Her ex-boyfriend apparently called the police on her for alleged »

Georgia Republican Senate Primary produces a runoff

Featured image With more than 90 percent of the precincts reporting in Georgia, the Republican Senate primary has finally been called. David Perdue will finish first and Rep. Jack Kingston will finish second. Perdue is at 30.3 percent; Kingston at 26.2 percent. Accordingly, there will be a runoff in July. Because the three candidates who came in next are quite conservative, and because collectively they captured more than 40 percent of the »

Sasse supreme

Featured image Nebraska Republican Ben Sasse prevailed in a competitive four-way primary yesterday to be the party’s candidate to succeed the retiring Mike Johanns. Sasse was recognized as the best man before the get-go by the Weekly Standard (see Mark Hemingway’s June 2013 profile) and thereafter by National Review (see John Miller’s January 2014 profile). Sasse is young, smart, and a diehard opponent of Obamacare. He is the president of Midland University. »

A long, hard fall for Rubio and Christie in New Hampshire

Featured image A new Granite State poll of likely New Hampshire Republican primary voters is out. The poll was conducted for WMUR by the University of New Hampshire. The results can’t be taken too seriously because only 1 percent of those surveyed say they have definitely decided how they will vote. But the results are interesting, nonetheless. Rand Paul is the leader at 15 percent. He is followed by “favorite daughter” Kelly »

The Republicans’ natural Senate majority, and its implications

Featured image I used to argue that the Republicans have a natural majority in the Senate in the sense that, given a 50-50 election, the House will be almost evenly divided, the presidential winner will be uncertain, but the Senate will likely be Republican (though this would require 50-50 elections over the course of three cycles). The reason, of course, is that the Senate gives equal weight to thinly populated states and »

No! in thunder

Featured image President Obama said yesterday: The debate over repealing this law is over. The Affordable Care Act is here to stay. … In the end, history is not kind to those who would deny Americans their basic economic security. Nobody remembers well those who stand in the way of America’s progress or our people. And that’s what the Affordable Care Act represents. As messy as it’s been sometimes, as contentious as »

In search of the cavalry

Featured image Bill Kristol’s latest piece — “A Superpower Once Lived Here” — is a powerful indictment of President Obama’s ruinous foreign policy and, more importantly, a plea for vigorous, effective opposition. First, the indictment: Putin understands Obama’s message. He knows he’s won Crimea. The question is whether he’ll win Ukraine. He thinks he will. He’s dealing with the Obama administration, after all. He looks at the U.S. withdrawal from Iraq and »

Reform Republicanism and the matter of timing

Featured image In 1981, Daniel Patrick Moynihan wrote, “Of a sudden, the GOP has become the party of ideas.” A lesser stylist would have settled for “All of a sudden.” But Moynihan wisely put his signature on what he probably expected would be a quotation oft-repeated. Repeating Moynihan’s quotation 33 years later, Peter Wehner says the time is ripe for the GOP to become the party of new ideas again. And he »

The Camp tax proposal and Reform Republicanism

Featured image House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp has proposed a radical overhaul of the U.S. Tax Code. Camp’s proposal broadens the tax base and lowers tax rates, which is the correct direction in which to move. Camp touts his proposal as “tax simplification,” which seems to be fair up to a point. However, his 1,000 page bill will leave federal taxation a complicated affair. Here, via Accounting Today, are »

Remembering Mr. Lincoln

Featured image Today is of course the anniversary of the birth of America’s greatest president, Abraham Lincoln. As a politician and as president, Lincoln was a profound student of the Constitution and constitutional history. Perhaps most important, Lincoln was America’s indispensable teacher of the moral ground of political freedom at the exact moment when the country was on the threshold of abandoning what he called its “ancient faith” that all men are »

Does Michael Needham run the Republican party?

Featured image David Brooks seems to think so. On NBC’s Meet the Press, Brooks said that the immigration reform debate is really “about who runs the Republican Party.” That is, “do the leaders who want to have a long-term future, a presidential, national future as a multi-racial party, do they run the party, or does Mike [Needham] run the party. And the truth is, Mike runs the party.” Brooks is partly right. »

Republicans to the rescue (of Dems)?

Featured image Thomas Sowell considers the quandary of the push by House GOP leadership for immigration reform. He poses the question: “Republicans to the rescue?” (of Democrats, of course). The column packs a lot of wit and wisdom into a short space. The whole thing could make up a quotable quote, but let me break it down into a few bite-sized portions and ask you to read the whole thing. One of »

GOP leadership vs. rising stars?

Featured image On CBS’s Face the Nation gabfest this morning, Major Garrett (substituting for Bob Schieffer) tried manfully to get House Majority Leader Eric Cantor to open up about the House leadership’s announced immigration reform principles (video below). Cantor wouldn’t sing, apart from reciting support for the Democratic line on “DREAMers.” (Insert groan here.) Why so shy? I find that peculiar. I don’t think the explanation is stupidity. I don’t think the »

What are they thinking and how can their thinking be changed?

Featured image This morning, in a post called “What Are They Thinking?,” Scott asked the question about which speculation has become rampant: Why is the House leadership preparing to push for immigration reform that the base doesn’t want at a time when the GOP seems poised to make big gains in the upcoming election? Scott posits “stupidity.” John has posited “cupidity,” stating: “the principal reason the Republican House leadership is willing to »