Sports

FBI suspected that first Clay-Liston fight was fixed

Featured image Fifty years ago this week Cassius Clay “shocked the world” by defeating Sonny Liston to win the Heavyweight Championship. Clay was a 7-1 underdog. Sports Illustrated rated his victory the fourth-greatest sports moment of the 20th century. However, Thom Loverro of the Washington Times reports that the FBI suspected the fight may have been fixed by a Las Vegas figure tied to organized crime and to Liston. The FBI was »

No tears for Piers

Featured image Piers Morgan, whose dwindling audience has been put out of its misery, isn’t an “unbelievably stupid man,” as he once called Larry Pratt of Gun Owners of America. He is, rather, an unbelievably rude and unpleasant man with a thoroughly mediocre mind. John Lott, who debated Morgan on gun control to the limited extent that the Brit permitted him to speak, deserves the last word on Morgan’s well-deserved sacking. Do »

Behind Boeheim’s blow-up

Featured image Syracuse basketball coach Jim Boeheim was ejected for the first time in his 38-year coaching career for wildly and profanely protesting a key call in Saturday’s game against Duke. The call was a charge against Syracuse’s C.J. Fair with 10 seconds left. Had the call gone Syracuse’s way — a block instead of a charge — and Fair had made the ensuing free-throw, the score would have been tied. Instead, »

“The Heroes Are the Ones In Camo”

Featured image Congratulations to the U.S. Olympic hockey team, which beat the Russians 3-2 in a shootout a few hours ago. The U.S. team’s hero was T.J. Oshie, who scored four shootout goals. Oshie, who plays for the St. Louis Blues, was born in Washington, went to high school in Warroad, Minnesota, and played for North Dakota. He was mobbed by media after the game: When asked by a reporter how it »

Reset this

Featured image Lucianne identifies the pic of the week, live from Sochi via Olympic bobsledder Johnny Quinn’s Twitter account (New York Daily News story here). Quotable quote: “With no phone to call for help, I used my bobsled push training to break out.” »

That Was Ugly

Featured image I should have known something was amiss when I saw that coat Joe Namath was wearing at the coin toss. And I know he’s confessed to having some “cognitive difficulties,” but c’mon, how hard is a coin toss?  I think the game was over after the first snap of the ball, after Peyton Manning clearly forgot to shout “Omaha!”  Couldn’t Denver have grabbed Eli Manning out of the skybox and »

Annals of Situational Liberalism, and Other Musings

Featured image Okay, if there were any groundhogs around my neighborhood right now, they wouldn’t be seeing their shadows, and I can never remember from year to year whether this means six more weeks of winter, or an early spring.  Here in Boulder, I’m guessing it means at least six more years of non-stop global warming alarmism • From the Annals of Situational Liberalism: With regard to President Obama’s extraordinary power grab, »

Jerry Smith — a football life and more

Featured image Jerry Smith of the Washington Redskins was as good a pass receiving tight-end as there was in the NFL during his era (the 1960s and 70s). What about John Mackey who “revolutionized” the position? Great player, true legend. They didn’t name the award given to the nation’s top collegiate tight-end the “Mackey Award” for nothing. But Smith caught 90 more passes than Mackey for more yards, and scored 22 more »

Trash-Talking In Sports and Politics

Featured image As the world knows, Seattle Seahawks defensive back Richard Sherman made a big play to clinch the NFC championship for Seattle, and almost immediately afterward was interviewed on television by Erin Andrews. Sherman went on an epic (albeit brief) rant in which he ripped San Francisco receiver Michael Crabtree and proclaimed himself “the best corner in the game.” Many have claimed to be appalled by Sherman’s lack of sportsmanship, but »

Memories of the Metrodome, and How It Got Built

Featured image Today, the Minneapolis Star Tribune headlined: “Court action throws wrench into Vikings stadium construction.” Sure: with projects of this magnitude, someone is always trying to stop them. The story brought back memories that I haven’t thought about for quite a while. Minneapolis’s Metrodome, former home of the Twins, Vikings and Gophers, is being demolished. The Twins moved several years ago to Target Field, and the Gopher football team now plays »

Richie Incognito, honorary black man?

Featured image The National Football League has a new scandal on its hands. This one involves the harassment of Miami Dolphins tackle Jonathan Martin by line mate Richie Incognito. The full nature and scope of this harassment isn’t clear, but apparently there is no dispute that, at a minimum, Incognito left Martin a voice mail calling him a “half ni____ piece of sh__” and threatening to inflict physical harm on the player »

A Quarterback Controversy With a Political Twist?

Featured image Public Policy Polling ran a survey here in Minnesota that was reported on in today’s St. Paul Pioneer Press. The political results were predictably dreary; both Mark Dayton and Al Franken are favored for re-election, in part because hardly anyone has heard of any of their prospective GOP opponents. But for some reason, PPP also asked some sports questions, and they found an interesting split with regard to the Minnesota »

Washington Redskins won’t change their name

Featured image And that’s too bad in a way. As a reader points out, many Americans, Indian and otherwise, are offended these days by the “Washington” part of the name. In any event, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, having met with Redskins owner Dan Snyder earlier in the week, delivered the message to representatives from Oneida Indian Nation, the group that has been leading the charge for a name change. The Nation’s representatives »

“Washington Bravehearts”? Not if Snyder changes the name

Featured image I hadn’t planned to write about the latest iteration of the dispute over the Washington Redskins name. Even after President Obama, Nancy Pelosi, Bob Costas, and (most importantly) Charles Krauthammer weighed in — all on the side of name-change — I didn’t feel the need to comment. But word that Redskins owner Dan Snyder may be contemplating changing the team name to Bravehearts (good thing Albert Haynesworth isn’t on the »

Service academy football games to proceed, as they should

Featured image For a while it looked like this Saturday’s Service Academy football games — including the big one between Navy and Air Force during which Navy’s 1963 Cotton Bowl team will be honored — might be cancelled due to the government shutdown. Because these games can be financed without government funding, cancelling them would have been an act of pure spite, like much else the government is doing with the shutdown. »

Finally, something I like about Barack Obama

Featured image Tevi Troy’s excellent new book What Jefferson Read, Ike Watched, and Obama Tweeted is full of revealing stories about presidential consumption of books, movies, and television. His discussion of Barack Obama’s consumption of culture, both as president and before, is particularly revealing. Obama, it seems, is not the most cultured guy ever to reside at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. He’s not even the most cultured among recent residents. But Obama has »

This week in college football history

Featured image On September 10, 1963, Darryl Hill, a wide receiver for the University of Maryland, became the first African-American to play football in the Atlantic Coast Conference, thus beginning the process of integrating big-time college football in the South. Hill’s debut came at College Park against North Carolina State. Thom Loverro, in the Washington Times, recalls this landmark event and the larger story around it. Hill played freshman football for the »