Tom Cotton

Escapism anyone? A look at 2020

Featured image Assuming that Donald Trump loses this year’s presidential race, who is likely to be the GOP nominee in 2020? The FiveThirtyEight crew takes a stab at this question (as well as the Democrats’ side of the equation). The discussion is too snarky and anti-Republican for my taste, but worthwhile nonetheless. Here (in no special order) are the six Republicans I consider most likely to be the nominee in four year: »

The GOP Convention, Night One [UPDATED — Melania borrowed from Michelle]

Featured image On the second day of the 2012 Republican national convention, the theme was “We Built It.” This represented both celebration of small businesses and a response to Obama’s offensive “you didn’t built that” remark chiding entrepreneurs. The program that night was effective up to a point. But to what extent do Americans still associate with the entrepreneurial spirit? Yes, a great many Americans remain sympathetic to small businessmen and businesswomen. »

Nationalism without a nationalist

Featured image Nationalism, by which I mean here vigorous push back against excessive internationalism and immigration, scored its second major victory of the year when Britain voted to leave the EU. The first victory came when Donald Trump won the Republican nomination. His closest rival, Ted Cruz, was also nationalistic in the sense described above, though not as vigorously so as Trump. Trump, though, is the underdog in his race against Hillary »

Donald Trump, Andrew Jackson, and Tom Cotton

Featured image When conservatism has succeeded in America, whether ideologically or politically, it has done so through the fusion of divergent philosophical viewpoints and diverse policy preferences. Ideologically, conservatism began to take off when William F. Buckley and the National Review crowd fused neo-liberalism — belief in free markets and individualism — with communitarian conservatism. Politically, conservatism prospered thanks to Ronald Reagan’s coalition of economic conservatives, social conservatives, and national security hawks »

Tom Cotton Tells the Truth About Harry Reid

Featured image In the last hour Sen. Tom Cotton took to the Senate floor to denounce the “bitter, vulgar, incoherent ramblings of the minority leader,” the “cancerous” Harry Reid. And it gets better from there. Take it in—just two minutes long: Has there ever been a more squalid senator than Reid? More to the point: Do we have to wait for 2020? How about Cotton-Sasse 2016? »

Sen. Tom Cotton on Crime and Justice in America

Featured image Senator Tom Cotton delivered an important address today at the Hudson Institute on crime and justice in America. Cotton said he believes that the criminal-leniency bill in the Senate — which would, among other things, lead to the release of many thousands of federal drug felons from prison — is dead in this year’s Congress. What the Senator didn’t say is that he deserves much of the credit for rallying »

Tom Cotton on the revised leniency for drug felons bill

Featured image Senator Tom Cotton was instrumental in rallying Republican Senators against the Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act late last year when momentum seemed to augur its passage. Thanks in large measure to the efforts of Senator Jeff Session and Senator Cotton, the bill was stopped in its tracks. Now Team Leniency for Drug Felons is trying again, with a revised version of the legislation. Relying on a lengthy analysis by Sen. »

Tom Cotton holds White House accountable on Iran

Featured image Sen. Tom Cotton has moved to block the confirmation of Adam Szubin, President Obama’s selection for the position of Under Secretary of the Treasury for Terrorism and Financial Crimes. Lee Smith has the story for the Weekly Standard. Blocking Szubin is Sen. Cotton’s way of holding the Obama administration accountable for its mendacity in connection with the Iran deal. Cotton agrees that Szubin is “well respected on both sides of »

Let’s hear it for the “hawkish upstart”

Featured image There isn’t much in the current political scene that brings a smile to my face, but the opening paragraph in this Politico article did: Sen. Tom Cotton, the hawkish upstart who’s already made waves railing against the Iran nuclear deal and government surveillance programs, is now leading a new rebellion against a bipartisan effort to overhaul the criminal justice system — hoping to torpedo one of the few pieces of »

Tom Cotton urges colleagues to oppose sentencing leniency legislaton

Featured image Barack Obama’s presidency has been hugely consequential. Think of Obamacare, the great Middle East retreat, the Iran nuclear deal, and the executive amnesty (don’t think of the farcical Paris climate change deal). Obama still hopes to empty Gitmo, but the accomplishment he most craves involves springing a different set of prisoners — major drug felons. Obama has important allies in this quest, namely a goodly number of Senate Republicans — »

President Obama: a wartime president who doesn’t seem to realize it

Featured image President Obama spoke to the nation tonight about the killings in San Bernardino and the matter of ISIS (or ISIL, as he says). The transcript of his address is here. John is working on a post about Obama’s speech and I may have some additional thoughts. But now, lets’s hear from Sen. Tom Cotton. He had this to say: President Obama is a wartime president who doesn’t seem to realize »

Senator Cotton addresses the Federalist Society

Featured image Our friend Sen. Tom Cotton had the honor of delivering the Barbara Olson memorial lecture at this year’s Federalist Society’s National Lawyers Convention. Barbara Olson is the distinguished the lawyer, author, and commentator who was killed in the 9/11 attacks. Here is the text of Senator Cotton’s address: Thank you very much for the kind introduction, and the warm welcome. It’s always an honor to speak to the Federalist Society. »

Ted Cruz and Tom Cotton, compare and contrast

Featured image Ted Cruz and Tom Cotton are similar in several respects. Both attended top Ivy League colleges and graduated from Harvard Law School. Both are extremely intelligent. Both were elected to the U.S. Senate as darlings of many conservatives. Neither was shy upon arrival. Both made their initial splash in committee hearings — Cruz when he took on Dianne Feinstein; Cotton when he said the Gitmo detainees can rot in hell. »

Who can’t find Iran on a map?

Featured image The left has a new talking point — actually a taunt — regarding Tom Cotton’s letter to Iran. In unison, the left is tweeting that the Senator, who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, couldn’t find Iran on a map. Accusing a political adversary of being a yokel — that’s just the kind of insightful analysis we can count on from the left. New York Times columnist Roger Cohen joined the »

Joe Biden “reveres” the Senate, but not its constitutional role [UPDATED]

Featured image As Scott notes, Tom Cotton has created a firestorm with his open letter to Iran, signed by 46 of his Senate colleagues. The letter explains that unless an agreement between President Obama and Iran receives Senate approval, it will not bind the next president. Vice President Biden intones that the letter is “beneath the dignity of an institution I revere.” This is sheer wind-baggery. If Biden revered the Senate, he »

Sen. Cotton to serve on intelligence committee

Featured image In my post last night listing Tom Cotton’s committee assignments, I failed to include the Select Committee on Intelligence. Arguably, this is the Senator’s must important assignment. We live in a time when defense budgets are being slashed and the U.S. president is largely unwilling to put American boots on the ground, even to fight bloody thirsty terrorists with designs on attacking America. In this environment, our intelligence professionals are »

Senator Tom Cotton

Featured image This evening, I attended a reception in honor of Tom Cotton who will be sworn in as a Senator tomorrow by Vice President Joe Biden. Tom now has a beard. Does it make him look more Senatorial? I don’t know. Check out his swearing in on C-SPAN and see what you think. Tom was very gracious as he greeted those of us in the receiving line. Although not a glad-hander, »