Grubergate Highlights the Corruption of the Obama Administration

Featured image The New York Post’s Kyle Smith does an excellent job of summing up the Jonathan Gruber scandal, and its significance: Gruber, the MIT economist who (in the words of The New York Times) “put together the basic principles of” ObamaCare and helped Congress “draft the specifics of the legislation” is one of a long line of liberals driven by the belief that the stupidity of the American people is so »

A Captain’s performance

Featured imageWayne Rooney made his 100th appearance for England in yesterday’s Euro 2016 qualifying match against Slovenia. Only eight players have played more matches for England. Rooney should surpass Steve Gerrard (115 appearances) as England’s most “capped” outfield player. And, as Rooney is still only 29 years old, Goalkeeper Peter Shilton’s record of 125 appearances is also in jeopardy. Rooney wore the captain’s arm band yesterday, as he has since Gerrard »

If you like your health insurance plan, you must pay more to keep your health insurance plan

Featured imageThe New York Times reports that many Americans with health insurance purchased under Obamacare will face substantial price increases next year — in some cases as much as 20 percent — unless they switch plans. The Times report is based on data released by the Obama administration on Friday, just hours before the health insurance marketplace opened to buyers seeking insurance for 2015. According to the Times, “the new data »

End of the cruise

Featured imageI’m at the Fort Lauderdale airport waiting to catch a plane to go home from the National Review 2014 post-election Caribbean cruise. In the festive afterglow of the midterms, the stops in Nassau, St. Thomas and St. Maarten were but interruptions in the impressive programming. Starring Rich Lowry, Jay Nordlinger, Jonah Goldberg, Kevin Williamson, John Podhoretz, Mona Charen, Andy McCarthy, John Yoo, Allen West, Bing West, Michael Walsh and a »

Hall of Fame

Featured imageI have been mostly off line for the last couple of days because I’ve been in my home town in South Dakota. The occasion was my father’s induction into the community’s Hall of Fame. There were three inductees this year; the others were John Calvin, a local businessman and investor, and Terry Redlin, the painter. One of the newspaper stories anticipating the event is below: 53 Eb 9500938 Fc 53eb959df1ec92 »

How’d Hillary do?

Featured imageDon Surber has an entertaining if wildly overoptimistic take on the midterm elections. Of most interest to me, however, is his contribution to answering the question I left hanging in my 13 notes on the morning after: how many competitive races in which Bill and Hillary Clinton stumped did their candidates win? Surber writes: “Hillary Clinton was about as effective as Pat Nixon on the campaign trail. Her candidates lost »

Ishmael Jones: Panetta’s betrayal

Featured imageIshmael Jones is a former CIA case officer. He is the author of The Human Factor: Inside the CIA’s Dysfunctional Intelligence Culture, the book that serves as the point of reference in the column below. Mr. Jones advises us that this column has been approved for publication by the CIA’s Publications Review Board. He writes: In 2008 I wrote a book that criticized CIA bureaucracy. The book contains no secrets »

Why conservatives should be wary of criminal sentencing reform

Featured imageThe war on standards in America proceeds on multiple fronts. Employers are under pressure to lower employment standards; public schools to lower student discipline standards; colleges to lower admissions standards; banks to lower lending standards, and so forth. America’s most basic standards are those embodied in its criminal laws. These standards are enforced through the penalites (usually in the form of prison sentences) associated with non-compliance. Conservatives generally have tried »

William Levin: The road to repeal

Featured imageWilliam Levin is a graduate of Yale Law School. He writes to comment on the Obamacare case pending before the Supreme Court. He argues that “the road to Obamacare repeal runs through through King v. Burwell.” His column makes assumptions that are subject to reasonable argument, such as Chief Justice Roberts’s ultimate position in the current case and the soundness of the Chief Justice’s position in what he calls Obamacare »

Gruber #4

Featured imageAnother Jonathan Gruber video has emerged. I think this is number four, but who’s counting? Gruber is, of course, the gift that keeps on giving, but seriously–what is it with this guy? Apparently he was incapable of giving a speech without blurting out something inappropriate about Obamacare. Too bad no one noticed until now. This time, Gruber says something truly controversial. He claims that Barack Obama is “not stupid.” That’s »

Clearing my spindle, NR edition

Featured imageI have been catching up on the past three or four issues of National Review between breaks in the programming on the NR cruise. Yesterday’s stop in St. Maarten interrupted the excellent programming that is the main attraction of the cruise. When the programming resumed, it kicked off with a panel on feminism featuring NR roving correspondent Kevin Williamson and Christina Hoff Sommers responding to questions presented by Jay Nordlinger. »

Grubinations, White House edition

Featured imageIs Jonathan Gruber more obnoxious than shameless? It’s hard to tell. Both qualities have made him a fitting spokesman for Obamacare; he gives us perfection in the art. His is the appropriate face of the the Democratic Party in the Age of Obama. The Obama White House naturally found Gruber a useful spokesman on behalf of the purported virtues of Obamacare. Like Obama himself, he would say anything on its »

The Week in Pictures: The Amnesty and the Ecstasy Edition

Featured imageSo, executive amnesty for illegal aliens next week, eh?  And a veto of a Keystone pipeline, eh?  Is Obama now trying to shoot the moon—become the most unpopular president ever? Is the bubble around the White House that bad, as Peggy Noonan suggests in her Saturday WSJ column?  Starting to look like it.  And oh goody—we’re going to regulate the Internet now—under a statute written in 1934.  I’m sure Jonathan »

A word with the man who…

Featured imageThe RightScoop puts it this way: “This is a great interview [by] Pat and Stu [with] Richard Weinstein, the man who is responsible for bringing us the latest Gruber videos. He explains what sparked his interest in Gruber and how he was ignored by everyone (even by Glenn Beck and crew) when he was trying to draw attention a Gruber video earlier this year.” On a related note, Jeff Dunetz »

For the Iranian regime, Obama’s the one

Featured imageThe Iranian regime has always had a pretty good handle on American politics. In 1979-81, it realized that Jimmy Carter was a pushover and that Ronald Reagan meant business. Hence the release of the American hostages immediately after Reagan took office. In 2003-04, the regime realized that George W. Bush meant business. Hence its apparent temporary backing off of its nuclear weapons development program. Soon thereafter, however, the regime saw »

Say goodnight, Mary

Featured imageHere is a poll to brighten your day. Bill Cassidy leads Mary Landrieu by 16 points, according to a survey by Magellan Strategies. The poll was taken for the Cassidy campaign, but the results don’t seem far-fetched. If you add Cassidy’s share of the vote on November 4 (41 percent) to the 14 percent share received by the other Republican in the race (Rob Maness), you get a landslide of »

Thoughts from the ammo line

Featured imageAmmo Grrrll addresses a subject I know a lot about: IMPERFECT ANGER MANAGEMENT. If I may say so, I feel her pain. She writes: A few weeks ago, the New York Times reported as “news” that the President was really angry, “seething”, to be precise, and let ‘er rip with his staff of designated liars, lickspittles, and sycophants. So with the Ocean-Lowerer as my mentor, I have decided to let »