Search Results for: jane mayer's dossiad

Jane Mayer’s Dossiad (5)

Featured image I think it would be a mistake to ignore Jane Mayer’s 15,000 word New Yorker profile of Christopher Steele. Perhaps it will be overtaken by the forthcoming congressional committee reports, but it may stand to serve its intended purposes stand until the Mueller project comes to fruition. Doing their bit to keep the narrative alive, MSNBC and NPR provided Mayer a forum to tout her work shortly after publication last »

Jane Mayer’s Dossiad (4)

Featured image Jane Mayer’s 15,000-word New Yorker profile of Christopher Steele is a sort of mash note to the man Mayer views as an intergalactic hero. One doesn’t need to be a sophisticated reader to see that she has fallen for the guy big time or that she reveals herself to be an unreliable narrator. For reasons I suggested yesterday in part 3, I think Steele made himself a willing dupe of »

Jane Mayer’s Dossiad (3)

Featured image It is the burden of Jane Mayer’s 15,000-word New Yorker profile of Christopher Steele to keep hope alive in the veracity of his dossier. To do so, Mayer whips up the ardor of a smitten teenager in the flush of first love. One can almost feel Mayer’s hormones raging. Given the comic book portrait of Steele as the mighty would-be savior of the republic, the thing should have been titled »

Jane Mayer’s Dossiad (2)

Featured image Jane Mayer’s 15,000-word New Yorker profile of Christopher Steele reads in part like the stuff of breathless teen girl fan magazines of old — Tiger Beat, say, or 16. Mayer presents Steele as a left-liberal heartthrob. She has fallen for the guy and she wants you to fall for him too. The profile also reads like the tendentious brief of an extraordinarily dishonest lawyer — perhaps a lawyer who has »

Jane Mayer’s Dossiad (1)

Featured image Former British spy Christopher Steele worked with Fusion GPS principal Glenn Simpson to get the contents of Steele’s dossier into the media before the 2016 election. Byron York reported that Steele personally briefed reporters from the New York Times, Washington Post, CNN, the New Yorker, and Yahoo, all to little or no effect. Mother Jones’s David Corn gave the received version of Steele’s story on October 31 in “A veteran »

We now know: The case of Jane Mayer

Featured image Several renowned journalists published hagiographic profiles of Christopher Steele as some kind of a savior: Howard Blum, John Cassidy, and, preeminently, Jane Mayer come to mind, among many others. Mayer wrote a ludicrous 15,000-word profile of Steele that appeared in the March 5, 2018 number of the New Yorker. I mocked Mayer’s profile of Steele in a five-part series that I called “Jane Mayer’s Dossiad.” The link is to part »

Jane Mayer revisits “golden showers”

Featured image Once upon a time the New Yorker was justly famous for its long-form journalism. In 1946 it published John Hersey’s “Hiroshima.” In 1966 it published Truman Capote’s “In Cold Blood.” In 1968 it published Edward Jay Epstein’s “Garrison,” a personal favorite of mine. The New Yorker’s reputation is not just based on history. It continues to publish distinguished long-form journalism. I think, for example, of John Colapinto’s 2013 article “Giving »

Who’s Toobin who

Featured image Lee Smith places the disgrace of Jeffrey Toobin into the context of the New Yorker’s political project in the Spectator USA column “Jeffrey Toobin’s stroke of misfortune” (“He is not the first journalist to get overexcited about ‘coup porn’”). Lee painted the big media picture out of which it emerged in the Tablet column “Don’t Believe Your Lying Eyes—or Joe Biden’s Big Mouth.” Lee’s Spectator column made me think back »