Red States and High Tides

I’m not sure who was the first to point out that income inequality is highest where liberals govern, i.e., New York City, San Francisco, LA, etc.  It’s also true of housing prices, not coincidentally.  This is only the beginning of a pattern recognition linked to liberal governance and elite opinion formation.

The folks at Yale have done an extensive public opinion survey on climate change broken down by county, and displayed in the map below.  Funny how it tracks the red-blue divisions of the electoral map (also below for comparison), but in this case the usual red-blue categories are reversed, with blue indicating less concern for climate change.  It also tracks the housing affordability map (also below).

Warming Map copy

One thing you can say from this map, however, is that a prospective 20-foot sea level rise would solve the nation’s electoral problems.  (I used to show the scary mocked-up photos of the Hamptons underwater from climate change with the tag that such pictures filled me with hope.  Always provoked outrage among the humorless climatistas.)

You can see already where this is going: another reason to sneer at everybody who lives in “flyover country.”  Then there’s this from the Yale news release:

“Although a majority of people in every state think global warming is happening, this analysis makes it possible to see how much opinions differ within each state,” said Peter Howe of Utah State University, the lead author of the paper. “These differences are partly due to the fact that different groups often think differently about the issue. For example, Hispanics and Latinos tend to be more worried about global warming than other racial or ethnic groups, which can be seen on the map in counties with more Latino residents.”

Cue the inevitable headline: “Climate Change: Women and Minorities Hardest Hit.”

Red Blue election map copy

Housing Map copy

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