What Stephanopoulos still hasn’t disclosed

George Stephanopoulos has admitted, under pressure, that he is a donor to the Clinton Foundation. He has also acknowledged that he should have so informed his viewers before attempting to light into Peter Schweizer and feebly trying to discredit Peter’s reporting about the Clinton Foundation on the grounds that he worked (for a few months) as a speechwriter for President George W. Bush.

But there is much Stephanopoulos has yet to disclose to his viewers. Schweizer lists the following:

In his on air apology for this ethical mess, Stephanopoulos did not disclose that in 2006 he was a featured attendee and panel moderator at the annual meeting of the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI).

He did not disclose that in 2007, he was a featured attendee at the CGI annual meeting, a gathering also attended by several individuals I report on in Clinton Cash, including mega Clinton Foundation donors Lucas Lundin, Frank Giustra, Frank Holmes, and Carlos Slim — individuals whose involvement with the Clintons I assumed he had invited me on his program to discuss.

Stephanopoulos did not disclose that he was a 2008 panelist at the CGI annual meeting which, once again, featured individuals I report on in the book, such as billionaire Clinton Foundation foreign donor Denis O’Brien.

ABC’s most visible news employee did not disclose that in 2009, he served as a panel moderator at CGI’s annual meeting, nor did he disclose that in 2010 and 2011, he was an official CGI member.

Stephanopoulos did not disclose that in 2013 and 2014, he and Chelsea Clinton served as CGI contest judges for awards, in part, underwritten by Laureate International Universities — a for-profit education company I report on in the book. Bill Clinton was on its payroll until his recent resignation.

The common denominator in what Stephanopoulos still hasn’t disclosed is the fact that Stephanopoulos didn’t just give the Clinton Foundation money, he gave it his time. Schweizer notes that time is the one thing news media personalities have very little of.

In Stephanopoulos’ case there’s a second thing: integrity.